July 12 – Open Meeting for the Indigenous Peoples’ Solidarity Movement – Ottawa

Open Meeting for the Indigenous Peoples’ Solidarity Movement – Ottawa

Are you interested in doing Indigenous solidarity organizing? Do you want to learn more about how to effectively oppose colonialism and to support Indigenous people, communities and nations?

If so, come out to the Indigenous Peoples’ Solidarity Movement – Ottawa’s upcoming open meeting, and get involved!

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Open Meeting for the IPSM Ottawa

Saturday, July 12 at 2pm
Friends (Quakers) Meetinghouse, 91A Fourth Ave.

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Everyone Welcome!
Wheelchair Accessible
www.ipsmo.org
Contact us if you require ASL/LSQ, bus tickets, child care:
ipsmo@riseup.net
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Are you interested in doing Indigenous Solidarity organizing? Do you want to learn more about how to effectively oppose colonialism and to support Indigenous communities and peoples?

If so, come out to the IPSM Ottawa upcoming open meeting, and get involved!

We are currently  organizing towards an Indigenous Solidarity Assembly at the Peoples’ Social Forum, and will be organizing an event in collaboration with the Asinabka Film Festival (www.asinabkafestival.org) on July 23rd.

About the IPSM Ottawa

The Indigenous Peoples’ Solidarity Movement of Ottawa started as a group of activists who did some solidarity organizing in support of the six nations land reclamation near Caledonia, in the summer of 2006.

Since then we have been doing Indigenous solidarity organizing in many varied ways and in support of many different people, issues, communities and nations. Some of this work includes supporting the Tyendinaga Mohawks during their occupation a quarry on their territory, supporting the Ardoch Algonquin and the Shabot Obaadjiwan First Nations in their opposition to a uranium nine on their territory, and supporting local anti-racist organizing at Carleton University.

Most of the work that we have done in the past 6 years, however, has been in support of the Algonquin community of Barriere Lake and supporting initiatives and groups struggling for justice for missing and murdered Indigenous women, girls and two-spirits.

Our Basis of Unity:

The Indigenous Peoples Solidarity Movement – Ottawa (IPSMO) is a grassroots organization that directly supports indigenous peoples in diverse struggles for justice. We also work within communities to challenge the lies and half-truths about indigenous peoples and colonization that dominate Canadian society. The organization is open to both indigenous and non-indigenous people, and focuses on local and regional campaigns.

As we act in solidarity with indigenous people, we build relationships where we can learn from indigenous cultures. By doing this, we can further decolonize ourselves, and so learn to better challenge the racist and colonial ideas that dominate Canadian society.

We provide support to actions and campaigns for Indigenous sovereignty, self-determination, defense of the land, environmental protection, cultural revitalization, and the honouring of treaties and agreements.

May 4 – Open Meeting for the Indigenous Peoples’ Solidarity Movement Ottawa

 

Are you interested in doing Indigenous solidarity organizing?

Do you want to learn more about how to effectively oppose colonialism and to support Indigenous people, communities and nations?

If so, come out to the IPSM Ottawa’s upcoming open meeting, and get involved!

=============================

Open Meeting for the Indigenous Peoples’ Solidarity Movement – Ottawa (IPSMO)

Image by Tania Willard.
Image by Tania Willard.

Sunday, May 4th at 2:00pm

Jack Purcell Community Centre, Rm 101
320 Jack Purcell Lane, near Elgin and Gilmour (Bus # 5 & 14)

www.facebook.com/events/264685173702861

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Everyone Welcome!

Wheelchair Accessible

Contact us if you require ASL/LSF, bus tickets, child care:
ipsmo@riseup.nethttp://www.ipsmo.org

=============================

 

We are currently one of the anchor groups working on organizing an Indigenous Solidarity Assembly during the Peoples’ Social Forum (PSF) in August of 2014.

In addition to this we will be doing other organizing to support the Forum, including activities such as designing and doing workshops about Indigenous Solidarity similar to, for example, our Indigenous Solidarity for Settlers workshop.

 

Indigenous Peoples Solidarity Movement Ottawa (IPSMO)
Indigenous Peoples Solidarity Movement Ottawa (IPSMO)

About the IPSM Ottawa

The Indigenous Peoples’ Solidarity Movement of Ottawa started as a group of activists who did some solidarity organizing in support of the six nations land reclamation near Caledonia, in the summer of 2006.

Since then we have been doing Indigenous solidarity organizing in many varied ways and in support of many different people, issues, communities and nations. Some of this work includes supporting the Tyendinaga Mohawks during their occupation a quarry on their territory, supporting the Ardoch Algonquin and the Shabot Obaadjiwan First Nations in their opposition to a uranium nine on their territory, and supporting local anti-racist organizing at Carleton University.

Most of the work that we have done in the past 6 years, however, has been in support of the Algonquin community of Barriere Lake and supporting initiatives and groups struggling for justice for missing and murdered Indigenous women, girls and two-spirits.

 

Our Basis of Unity:

The Indigenous Peoples Solidarity Movement – Ottawa (IPSMO) is a grassroots organization that directly supports indigenous peoples in diverse struggles for justice. We also work within communities to challenge the lies and half-truths about indigenous peoples and colonization that dominate Canadian society. The organization is open to both indigenous and non-indigenous people, and focuses on local and regional campaigns.

As we act in solidarity with indigenous people, we build relationships where we can learn from indigenous cultures. By doing this, we can further decolonize ourselves, and so learn to better challenge the racist and colonial ideas that dominate Canadian society.

We provide support to actions and campaigns for Indigenous sovereignty, self-determination, defense of the land, environmental protection, cultural revitalization, and the honouring of treaties and agreements.

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Orientations for the IPSM Ottawa – March 25 & 27

Click for PDF poster
Click for PDF poster
Orientation for the IPSM Ottawa

 

Monday, March 25 at 7:00pm
McNabb Community Centre, 180 Percy St. (facebook event)

Or

Wednesday, March 27 at 7:00pm
University of Ottawa, Fauteux Hall (FTX) Room 402 (facebook event)

 

Free
Wheelchair Accessible
Contact us in advance regarding ASL
ipsmo@riseup.nethttp://www.ipsmo.org

 

Are you interested in organizing with the Indigenous Peoples Solidarity Movement Ottawa (IPSMO)?

We will be having two orientation sessions in March for people interested in learning about the IPSM Ottawa.

The first will be on Monday March 25 at McNabb Community Centre, and the second will be on Wednesday March 27 at the University of Ottawa.

http://www.ipsmo.org/

 

The Indigenous Peoples’ Solidarity Movement of Ottawa (IPSMO) is a grassroots community organization that is committed to supporting indigenous struggles for justice, decolonization and self-determination.

We started organizing in 2006 in support of the Caledonia land reclamation, and are currently most active in supporting the Barriere Lake Algonquin, and working to end violence against indigenous women and girls.

We have regular orientation sessions for people who are or think they might be interested in organizing with us in support of indigenous resistance.

Feb 14 – Day of Justice: Rally for Sisters in Spirit

Monday February 14, noon-1:30pm
Parliament Hill, Ottawa, Algonquin Territory
(Facebook page)

Also events in Vancouver and Winnipeg, Edmonton, Toronto and Montreal

Come out and show support for the survival of the Native Women’s Association of Canada’s (NWAC) unprecedented Sisters in Spirit campaign (SIS), which, since it’s inception in 2004, has worked to raise awareness about violence against Native women and girls in Canada–namely, those who have gone missing or been murdered.

SIS not only compiled a data for over 583 cases of missing and murdered Native women in five years time, but also identified key patterns integral to understanding the systemic nature of the violence: media neglect or racial bias, police racism or negligence, victimization of Native women by the Justice system, and governmental apathy and enforcement of cycles of poverty for Native communities, to name a few. In a relatively short period of time, SIS also managed to raise the profile of the issue in the media and in the minds of the population at large, while providing indispensable support to the families of victims and creating a cross-country network.

This October 86 communities organized the 5th annual memorial Sisters in Spirit March and Vigil, including one in Nicaragua.

In spite of this progress, and the ongoing collection of new data (indeed, grassroots groups have put the number of missing and murdered women much closer to 2000), the government has held SIS in funding limbo for the past 8 months, ever since the release of Canada’s 2010 budget back in March, when $10 million was promised to “address the issue of missing and murdered Native women.” It wasn’t until November 2010 that the government finally made the announcement that confirmed the worst fears of many activists, organizers, and even opposition MPs: the money would not go to fund SIS research, but would instead fulfill the government’s new idea of safety for women, and include requirements for enhanced police power: amendments to the Criminal Code to allow police to wiretap without warrants in emergencies and obtain multiple warrants on a single application. This will not only increase the likelihood of criminalization of women, Native communities, and other vulnerable sectors of the population, but will be expected to operate without the backbone of research and data collection. Add to this the historical and ongoing relationship of distrust between many Native communities and police, who are themselves implicated in a number of documented violent altercations with Native women. Gladys Tolley, for instance, was killed by the Surete du Quebec in 2001 and no one was ever brought to justice. Her daughter Bridget Tolley has pushed for an independent investigation for years and was recently refused.

ENOUGH is ENOUGH!! We will not stand for the continued stripping down of First Nations programs essential to the physical safety and mental and emotional health of Native women and Native communities, as we have seen earlier this same year with the Aboriginal Healing Foundation and First Nations University.

RALLY FOR JUSTICE on February 14th. SHOW YOUR LOVE!

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Volunteers needed!

We are looking for volunteers who would like to help out on the Hill, February 14th from noon to 1:30 pm (shorter if windchill warning in effect).

There are a number of tasks available:

– Handing out rally signs
– Handing out memorial armbands
– Being a part of our human billboard (by holding 1 of 19 letters to send a clear message to Stephen Harper)
– Helping to coordinate the human billboard on the steps of the Hill
– Taking photos/video of the event (to be posted online afterwards)

If you are interested in volunteering please email Kristen at familiesofsistersinspirit@gmail.com

In love and resistance!