le 3 janvier 2017 – Solidarité à Val d’Or avec les femmes authochtones

(ENGLISH FOLLOWS) En réponse aux poursuites de 2,3 millions entamées par 41 policiers de Val d’Or contre ICI Radio-Canada pour avoir couvert les accusations des femmes autochtones de 37 cas d’agressions sexuelles, une démonstration aura lieu à la station de police de Val d’Or le 3 janvier 2017. Cette démonstration servira aussi de réponse à la récente marche en support aux dit policiers, impliquant quelques citoyens de Val d’Or.

QUOI : Blancs (et autres) en solidarité avec les femmes autochtones
QUAND : Mardi 3 janvier 2017, 11h30am-1h00pm
OU : Val d’Or –1151 rue d’Escale (en dehors de la station de police)
POURQUOI : Démontrer notre support envers les autochtones qui ont dénoncées les injustices

  • Des lettres de support envoyées par différentes personnes ou organisations à travers du Canada seron lues sur place.
  • La démonstration demande spécifiquement aux blancs de démontrer leur support avec les femmes autochtones.
  • Le thème de démonstration assertera que :
    o Nous croyons les femmes autochtones et dénonçons la culture du viol qui laisse la vaste majorité des agressions sexuelles jamais dénoncées et/ou impunies.
    o Que la violence policière contre les personnes autochtones, peu importe la forme qu’elle prend, est une manifestation contemporaine de la suprématie blanche et du colonialisme d’occupation dans le présent.
    o Qu’il y a des alliés non-autochtones qui suivent et dénoncent ces injustices partout au Canada

CONTACT: Trycia Bazinet tryciabazinet@gmail.com

Facebook for live video and more information: @IPSMO (Indigenous People’s Solidarity Movement Ottawa
Page de l’évènement : https://www.facebook.com/events/1689759581338008/

January 3, 2017 – Solidarity in Val d’Or with Indigenous Women

In response to the lawsuit launched by 41 police officers against the news outlet (ICI Radio-Canada) that aired the testimonies of Indigenous women denouncing sexual assault (37 cases recorded), a demonstration will take place at the Val d’Or police station on January 3rd 2017. This demonstration is also a response to the citizen’s march in support of police officers, which recently took place in Val d’Or.

WHAT: Non-native Solidarity rally for Indigenous women attacked by police in Val d’Or
WHEN: Tuesday January 3rd (2017) 11:30am – 1:00pm
WHERE: Val d’Or – 1151 rue d’Escale (outside the police station)
WHO: Non-native (especially whites) in support of those confronting and exposing mistreatment by police
WHY: To show support for those risking their own safety to stand up for justice

  • Letters of support, sent by various individuals and organizations, will be read on spot.
  • Main messages of the rally:
    o We believe Indigenous women and denounced rape culture, which results in the the vast majority of sexual assaults of ever being denounced and/or punished.
    o That police violence against Indigenous peoples, in whichever forms it takes, is a contemporary manifestation of white supremacy and ongoing colonialism of occupation.
    o There are allies all accross Canada following this case and denouncing the injustices

CONTACT : Rally coordinator Trycia Bazinet tryciabazinet@gmail.com

Facebook for live video and more information: @IPSMO (Indigenous People’s Solidarity Movement Ottawa)
Facebook event page : https://www.facebook.com/events/1689759581338008/

jan3-valdor

VIDEO: Andrea Smith at Women’s Worlds 2011

Speaking on the ‘Breaking Cycles’ plenary at the international conference in Ottawa, unceded Algonquin territory, in July 2011.

From the Women’s Worlds 2011 program: “PROVOKER: A feminist thinker and anti-violence activist from the Cherokee nation, Andrea has garnered international respect for her advocacy on violence against women of colour specifically Native American women. Co-founder of “INCITE! Women of Color Against Violence”, Andrea currently teaches in the Department of Media and Cultural Studies at the University of California, Riverside. Prior to that, she was assistant professor of American Culture and Women’s Studies at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.”

 

 

Women’s Worlds 2011 was a five-day international women’s congress, consisting of 4 plenaries and approximately 300 sessions and other events. Over 2,000 women from around the world were in attendance, and 2011 marked the 30th anniversary of the first Women’s Worlds gathering.

The Breaking Cycles plenary consisted of Andrea Smith, Devaki Jain, Tanya Tagaq and moderator Joanne St. Lewis. See the full video of the plenary: http://vimeo.com/25984077

Honouring Indigenous Women Campaign Launch Party!

The Indigenous Peoples Solidarity Movement Ottawa (IPSMO) is inviting you to the launch of its Honouring Indigenous Women Campaign and its Honouring Indigenous Women: Hearts of Nations – Vol. 1 booklet!

Click to download the poster and spread the word!

7 – 9 PM. Monday, March 19, 2012
Arts Court Studio, 2 Daly Ave. Ottawa
Unceded Algonquin Territory

Join us for a night of poetry, drumming and more, in celebration of the Power of Indigenous Women and their Special Relationship to Water!

To invite your friends via Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/320011758055132/

MC: Cindy Gaudet (Métis)

Opening ceremony and women’s teaching by Verna McGregor (Algonquin) and Elaine Kicknosway (Swampy Cree from Northern Saskatchewan)

Featuring …..

Ruby Arnga-naaq (Inuit)
Earth Mothers women drumming group
Water teaching by Grandmother Francine Payer
Vera Wabegijig (Ojibwe),
Suzanne Keeptwo (Métis – Algonquin/French & Irish descent),
Jaime Koebel (Métis),
David Groulx (Ojibwe/Métis)

* There will be items made by Indigenous peoples for sale at this event.

About our campaign:

Our Honouring Indigenous Women Campaign aims at raising awareness on and putting an end to the violence perpetrated against Indigenous women. As a group mostly composed of non-Indigenous peoples who have participated or been complicit in the past and present colonization of Native peoples and lands, it is of utmost importance for us to support the work of Indigenous peoples in this regard. This campaign is an act of solidarity, and aims at supporting existing efforts from Indigenous women. As such, we are hoping to mobilize over 500 people to take part in the annual Families of Sisters in Spirit Vigil organized in Ottawa on October 4th.

This campaign also aims at understanding the links between violence against Indigenous women, colonialism, land and Indigenous Sovereignty. We echo the demands for equity, justice, and decolonization formulated by Indigenous women whom we have tremendous respect for.

We support self-determination of Indigenous peoples and work towards creating and maintaining respectful relationships with the First peoples of this land.

The campaign would not be as strong without the publication of the Honouring Indigenous Women: Hearts of Nation-Vol. 1 . The booklet, composed of five sections – Struggle, Resistance, Power, Liberation, and Be Solidarity, gives to Indigenous women their due space to express their lived realities through various art forms. Through this publication, we strive to augment the voices of Indigenous women in their many efforts to break the silence surrounding the systemic violence perpetuated by colonialism. It is, for us, a concrete and creative form of solidarity.

As a wise woman told us, we cannot achieve the ethic of respect by formulating demands, we will clearly state our hopes and expectations for this campaign and beyond, as well as announce our upcoming projects at our March 19th event. Stay tune!

To download Honouring Indigenous Women: Hearts of Nation-Vol. 1:  https://ipsmo.wordpress.com/honouring-indigenous-women/

Understanding violence against Indigenous women:

Mar18-19: Forum on Police Violence, Incarceration and Alternatives

Forum on Police Violence, Incarceration and Alternatives

LE FORUM SUR LA VIOLENCE POLICIÈRE, L’EMPRISONNEMENT ET LES ALTERNATIVES – OTTAWA 18 ET 19 MARS 2011

Schedule//horaire

FRIDAY MARCH 18th=====================

Opening Panel – 7pm

with Ashanti Alston, Bridget Tolley, Julie Matson, Jaggi Singh

MRT 205 (U of O campus)

In this opening panel the panelists will speak about their various
experiences with and analysis of the police, prisons and alternatives to
both.

Ashanti Alston:

is a former member of the Black Panther Party and ex-political prisoner.
He publishes the Zine Anarchist Panther and has been a guest lecturer at
the Institute for Social Ecology in Vermont, speaking on the Panthers and
the history of Black nationalist movements. He has spent time in Chiapas,
Mexico, studying the autonomous structure of Zapatista communities and
working on his memoirs. Ashanti resides in Rhode Island, where he is
presently the national co-chair of the Jericho Amnesty Movement, and an
active member of Estacion Libre, the Malcolm X Grassroots Movement, and
Critical Resistance.

Bridget Tolley:

is a member of the Kitigan Zibi First Nation in Quebec. Her mother was
struck and killed by the Quebec Police on October 6th, 2001.She believes
that there was homicidal negligence on the part of Surete du Quebec
officers and is presently working on a complete review of the
investigation, arguing that homicide files were filled with inaccuries and
incongruent reports and that police procedures were not conducted
according to accepted practices.Bridget feels the dignity and respect of
the deceased and family members was greatly breached by all police
officers and the investigation team involved.

Julie Matson:

is the daughter of Ben Matson who was killed by Vancouver police in 2002.
She is an activist who opposes police violence and impunity. She says
investigations into police killings and brutality should be conducted by a
third party not connected to any police force. She says the way police
there handled the investigation into her father’s death is typical of what
happens across the country.

“I witnessed first hand cover-ups, lies, misinformation [and] conveniently
forgotten reports,” said Matson. “It’s not recognizing the real story
that’s happening there. It’s just recognizing what they want to see, and
that’s protecting themselves.”

Jaggi Singh:

is a long-time organizer and activist. He has been involved in many groups
and campaigns over the years, especially the anti-capitalist movement
(CLAC), anti-racism and migrant-justice (with No One Is Illegal –
Montreal), indigenous solidarity and anti-police brutality. He was also
targeted for arrest during the recent anti-g8/g20 protests in Toronto.

SATURDAY MARCH 19th==========================

Morisset rooms 219, 221, 250, 256 – U of O campus

More info and confirmed speakers to come soon

Confirmed Speakers:

Sara Falconer
Anne K. Abbot
Patrizia Gentile
Sunny Marriner
Karl Kersplebedeb
Ottawa Movement Defence
Ontario Coalition Against Poverty
Coalition Opposed to Police Brutality
Transvestite and Transsexual Health Action
Prostitutes of Ottawa: Work, Educate, Resist

The themes of the conference will be police violence, especially against
resistance movements, how to support prisoners, state violence against
indigenous communities, alternatives to prison, campaigns against state
repression and much more.

We hope that you will be inspired by the conference and that this
inspiration will translate into a renewal of local initiatives against
police violence, prisons and creating alternatives to both.

Les thèmes de la conférence seront la violence policière dans les
mouvements contestataires, comment supporter ceux présentement
emprisonnés, la violence d’état dans les communautés Autochtones, les
alternatives aux prisons, campagnes contre la répression et plusieurs
autres.

Nous espérons que vous serrez inspirés par la conférence et que cette
inspiration se traduira en un renouvellement d’initiatives locales contre
la violence policière!

More info: 613-230-3076 / opirgrc@gmail.com / http://policeforum.wordpress.com

IPSMO has endorsed this event.

Vigil for the 500+ missing & murdered Aboriginal women

Help raise awareness about the violence and injustice suffered by Aboriginal women in Canada!

When: Friday, March 18th, 2pm
Where: Parliament Hill

* Click the images to download the posters

The McGill University Human Rights Working Group invites you take part in a vigil at Parliament Hill taking place Friday, March 18th at 2pm. The vigil will be the culmination of a two-week campaign in which McGill students, faculty and friends will strive to collect over 500 pairs of women’s shoes to be displayed on the steps of Parliament as a symbolic representation of the missing and murdered women. The shoes will be donated to women’s shelters in Ottawa and Montreal following the event.

Speakers at the vigil will include Kristen Gilchrist, Bridget Tolley and Lindsay Mossman. Those with personal stories or insight about the Stolen Sisters are welcome to come forward and share as well.

This event is part of a 13-day program honouring aboriginal women. The McGill Human Rights Working Group, in conjunction with McGill’s Aboriginal Law Students Association, the McGill Centre for Human Rights and Legal Pluralism, Missing Justice and the Aboriginal Health Group will be hosting a variety of events, beginning March 8th – International Women’s Day.

For more information about any of the events, including shoe donations and group transportation to Ottawa, please contact tiffany.boisvert@mail.mcgill.ca.

 

Update re:Peru situation

NEW!

AND – NEW NOTICE – Protest at Peruvian Embassy, 130 Albert St, on THURSDAY JUNE 18 beginning at 11:30 – see you there!

PLUS – contact Canadian senators and urge them to block Bill C-24, the law to implement Canada-Peru Free Trade Agreement:  http://www.canadians.org/action/2009/11-June-09.html

Canadian actions:

OTTAWA: Demonstration and information picket
Thursday June 11 11:30-1:30
In front of Peruvian Embassy
130 Albert between O´Connor and Metcalfe
ipsmo@riseup.nethttps://ipsmo.wordpress.com
Note: Organizations endorsing the four demands on the Peruvian government include: Common Cause Ottawa; Common Frontiers; Council of Canadians; MiningWatch Canada; OPIRG/GRIPO-Ottawa; Ottawa-Outaouais Industrial Workers of the World (IWW); Rights Action; Students Against Israeli Apartheid -Carleton (SAIA); and Indigenous Peoples Solidarity Movement -Ottawa.

TORONTO Protest activity
Thursday, June 11, 1pm
Consulate of Peru, Toronto
10 St. Mary’s St. (just south of Bloor St. at Yonge)
More info: Carlos Torchia, Coordinator, Latin American Solidarity Network-Toronto, torontoboliviasolidarity@gmail.com

MONTREAL: Demonstration for Life in Bagua
Friday, June 12
12:00 Noon / à midi
Peruvian Consulate
550 Sherbrooke West,
Metro McGill
Organized by: Action Créative, Société Bolivarienne du Québec, Hands Off Venezuela et Mohawk Traditional Council of Kahnawake

PETITIONS:
http://www.avaaz.org/en/peru_stop_violence/?cl=250248179&v=3461
http://www.ipetitions.com/petition/Amazon/index.html

FACEBOOK GROUP: Solidarity With Peru
http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=89605273186

ARTICLES/WEBSITES:
* Reports by Ben Powless, IPSMO member currently in Peru
http://rabble.ca/taxonomy/term/2686
* In depth analysis of the situation, by Gerardo Rénique:
https://nacla.org/node/5879
* News from AmazonWatch.org – includes action items
http://www.amazonwatch.org/peru-protests.php
MESSAGE FROM BOB LOVELACE:

Another Day in the – Life of Peru and Canada
June 10th

While in the Amazon region of Ecuador a few weeks ago I wrote to a friend, “At least now I can say that I have seen the Garden of Eden”. My worst fear, the gnawing secret I would not have dared to breathe, was that the beautiful courageous people that we met and shared stories with would one day be murdered for their land and the hidden metals of which they had no need of themselves. Just over the hills was Peru. As I looked south I had wondered who lived there. Now I know.

In the last six days we have learned who lives there. Mostly they are indigenous people whose genes have flowed through the region as long as the rivers have. They are not poor, because they are at home, because they are among their families and clans, because they walk in the footsteps of their ancestors, because the land that has sustained hundreds of generations will continue to care for them. They are frightened now. Six days ago they were worried that their land would be destroyed; now they fear that everything will perish. They are courageous. They do not hide when the helicopters fly over. They watch them come and go. And they will watch them go, watch them go.

Tomorrow will be the seventh day. Tomorrow, Thursday June 11th, our job is to make the world aware of what has happened in Peru. In Ottawa, we will be at the Peruvian Embassy. In Toronto, we will be at the Peruvian Consulate. Where ever you are tomorrow you must make your voice heard. Call your local Canadian Bank and tell them to stop investing in extractive industries, mining, drilling, forestry and agri-business that are overlooking or participating in human rights abuses. Call your local MP and MPP and tell them that you are tired of them selling your soul for an economy that places so little value on human life. Call your neighbour and ask them to join you in denouncing the media for keeping you ignorant of the truth that Canada is complicit, as a free trade partner, in the murder of people this week in Peru.

You see, we can do something. We may not be on the frontline but we can make a difference. We can save lives by making our names, faces and attitudes known. If you have a camera, take pictures at a demonstration, of yourself and friends holding signs, of sidewalk chalk messages that you write on Bay Street, use your imagination and then post those pictures on the web where people in Peru can see them. Tell them with pictures that they are not alone. And then send those pictures to the politicians and to the mining companies and to the Banks, to the US Embassy, the Peruvian Embassy, so that they will know that our brothers and sisters in Peru are not alone. You are not alone.

We can also share our wealth or a portion of our poverty with indigenous people in Peru. They can use it right now.

I have spoken with Grahame Russell of Rights Action (Canada). Rights Action is an NGO that works primarily in Central America with communities opposing mining and resource extraction. Grahame has agreed that 100% of the donations that are made to Rights Action in the name of “current conflict in Peru” will go directly to indigenous peoples’ organizations in the affected area. I will work with my contacts in Ecuador and Peru to direct the money where it will do the most good. Please encourage people on your e-lists to give something to support healing for people in Peru. And please give something yourself.

TO MAKE TAX-DEDUCTIBLE DONATIONS for indigenous organizations in Peru resisting the harms of large-scale “development” projects (mining, tourism, hydro-electric dams) and promoting their own development, human rights and environment projects, make check payable to “Rights Action” and mail to:

* CANADA: 552 – 351 Queen St. E, Toronto ON, M5A-1T8
* UNITED STATES: Box 50887, Washington DC, 20091-0887

CREDIT-CARD DONATIONS: http://rightsaction.org/contributions.htm

NB – Write “Peru–Indigenous Rights” on the cheque’s memo line, or in the appropriate field of the on-line credit card donations. This will ensure that every dollar you donate will go directly to the people it is intended to help.

Questions? Contact Grahame Russell, director, info@rightsaction.org, 1-860-751-4285

The Ben Powless Interview on CBC, “The Current” has been switched to Friday morning. Get in and listen because Ben is now at Pagua, Peru conducting interviews and helping search for evidence.

Support those demonstrations tomorrow. I will see you there!

Please forward this email to all of your e-lists. Since mainstream media is playing this down or not even present we need to be the news.

Migwetch,
In peace and Friendship,

Robert Lovelace