URGENT: Chaudière Falls & Islands sacred site – Proposed condominium rezoning hearing, City of Ottawa

URGENT: 4pm Wed Oct 1st deadline to register to speak or submit to the City of Ottawa Planning Committee, that is meeting Thurs Oct 2nd 9:30am at City Hall to consider a rezoning proposal for two of the islands in order to allow the Windmill condominium development

Overview of planning vision for Indigenous & Peace Centres on sacred islands at Chaudiere Falls.
Overview of vision for Indigenous & Peace Centres on sacred islands at Chaudiere Falls.

Continue reading / scrolling for registration instructions & background information, along with compelling new 10-min video of renowned Aboriginal architect Douglas Cardinal.

The Planning Committee will decide upon a recommendation to put forward for voting on by the full City council on Oct 8th, but there will be no opportunity for public input at the Oct 8th meeting.

Giving the go-ahead to building condominiums on these islands would detrimentally impact the ability to achieve the full vision of the late Algonquin spiritual leader Grandfather William Commanda for this religious / sacred site.

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TO REGISTER: Contact Committee Coordinator, Christopher Zwierzchowski at 613-580-2424 extension 21359, in advance of the meeting, by at least 4:00 pm on Wednesday, to register to speak to the committee (presentations of 5 minutes maximum).

Or, you can email him a written submission, by the same deadline (or possibly anytime before midnight on Wed Oct 1st), at: christopher.zwierzchowski@ottawa.ca – also cc: hieu.nguyen@ottawa.ca

OF NOTE: If a person or public body does not make oral submissions at the public meeting or make written submissions to the City of Ottawa before the proposed official plan amendment is adopted or the zoning by-law is passed, the person or public body is not entitled to appeal the decision of the Council of the City of Ottawa to the Ontario Municipal Board.

ALSO: Call or email your local councillor, especially if they are on the Planning Committee, to express your concern. Members of the Planning Committee are: Peter Hume, chair; Jan Harder, vice-chair; Stephen Blais; Rainer Bloess; Rick Chiarelli; Catherine Hobbs; Allan Hubley; Bob Monette; Shad Qadri; Tim Tierney. Contact information for councillors is at: http://ottawa.ca/en/city-council

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BACKGROUND INFORMATION on Grandfather William Commanda’s vision for the Sacred Chaudière Site, and on the City’s rezoning proposal:

VIDEO – Architect Douglas Cardinal explaining things (link to watch on youtube)

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July 23 – Decolonizing Together: Indigenous Walking Tour, Solidarity Assembly & Asinabka Festival Film Screening

UPDATE:

Media from the event:

Facebook pages:

 
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decolonizingtogetherDecolonizing Together:
Indigenous Walking Tour, Solidarity Assembly &
Asinabka Festival Film Screening

– Walking Tour with Jaime Koebel
– Opening by a local Elder
– Robert Lovelace will be speaking
– Movie Screening of Rhymes For Young Ghouls with Asinabka Film Festival
* Note Director Jeff Barnaby will be in attendance for a Q & A

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Wednesday, July 23

Walking Tour Starts at 5:30pm
– meet at the Human Rights Monument, Elgin and Lisgar

Assembly begins at 7:15pm on Victoria Island

Movie starts at 8:45pm on Victoria Island

Free Food
Suggested Donation: $5 – $15
No one turned away for lack of money
Accessibility notes below

Contact Us:
asinabkafestival@gmail.com
www.asinabkafestival.org/
ipsmo@riseup.net
http://ipsmo.org

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Decolonizing Together is about listening to indigenous people, taking direction from them, sticking around in decolonizing movement, and discussing together what it means to be responsible allies to indigenous people and communities struggling for justice and decolonization.

We will start by learning from Jaime Koebel, a Metis artist and educator, about the often hidden indigenous history, art and culture in the city of Ottawa.

After we arrive at Victoria Island there will be an opening by a local Elder.

To open the solidarity assembly we will hear about the Algonquin history of the Ottawa River valley from Ardoch Algonquin elder and Queen’s University Professor, Robert Lovelace.  This will lead us into a collective discussion about what meaningful Indigenous Solidarity and Decolonization movement is, and how we can do it.

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Indigenous Walking Tour w/ Jaime Koebel: http://indigenouswalks.com/

“Indigenous Walks is an active, educational and fun way to learn about Indigenous Peoples’ experiences in Ottawa. This guided walk and talk provides a layer of knowledge of the Nation’s Capital through art, culture and history.”

Indigenous Solidarity Assembly w/ Robert Lovelace, Ardoch Algonquin Elder

We are honoured that Robert Lovelace will be with us to speak about the Algonquin history of the Ottawa valley.  The entire Ottawa river watershed is the traditional territory of the Algonquin people.  His words will begin a large group discussion on the nature of Indigenous Solidarity and Decolonization.

This small assembly is part of the lead up to the Peoples’ Social Forum happening from Aug. 21 – 24, and our plans to have an Indigenous Solidarity Movement Assembly during the forum.  It will involve a collective discussion about questions that are important to indigenous solidarity movement: What is Indigenous Solidarity and how do we do it effectively?  As settlers, what are our differing roles and responsibilities in decolonization movement?

Film Screening by Asinabka Film & Media Arts Festival
www.asinabkafestival.org

Rhymes for Young Ghouls (2013)
Director: Jeff Barnaby
Runtime: 88 min
Rating: 14A
Guided by the spirits of her departed mother and brother, an Aboriginal teenager plots revenge against a sadistic Indian Agent in this fiercely irreverent debut feature from Canadian director Jeff Barnaby.
Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=feWS9simNFI&feature=kp

*Note Director Jeff Barnaby will be in attendance for a Q & A

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Accessibility Notes:

– These events are wheelchair accessible: Victoria Island is listed as BASIC ACCESSIBILITY. The main area is grass covered, and the site has an accessibility ramp. There is an accessible toilet.  If you require assistance, our volunteers can help you.
– Childcare will be available
– Contact us if you require bus tickets
– The movie has closed captioning/subtitles in English
– We are trying to secure ASL interpretation, updates about ASL to come
– Do not wear colognes, perfumes or other scented products as some people have severe allergies

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This event was co-organized by the Asinabka Film Festival and the Indigenous Peoples’ Solidarity Movement – Ottawa (IPSMO) and our partners: KAIROS, MiningWatch, Justice For Deepan, Independent Jewish Voices, No One Is Illegal – Ottawa, and the Peoples’ Social Forum.

Our partners:

KAIROS: http://www.kairoscanada.org/
MiningWatch: http://www.miningwatch.ca/
Independent Jewish Voices: http://ijvcanada.org/
Justice For Deepan: http://www.justicefordeepan.org/
Peoples’ Social Forum: http://www.peoplessocialforum.org/
No One Is Illegal – Ottawa: http://noii-ottawa.blogspot.ca/
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Asinabka Festival, July 23 – 29

The full schedule for this week long film festival will be available soon.

Currently in our 3rd year of programming, the mandate of the Asinabka Festival is to present an annual Indigenous film and media arts festival in the Nations Capital that allows independent artists – national, international, Indigenous, non-Indigenous – to share, present, and disseminate their work.

http://asinabkafestival.org

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The Solidarity Assembly and Asinabka Movie screening are happening on Victoria Island, in sight of the Chaudière falls.  The Chaudière falls are a deeply important cultural site for the Algonquin people.  They were negatively impacted by the Hydro Ring Dam that was built in 1908.  The current plans of Windmill Development Group to “develop” and gentrify the Domtar building currently on the Island is a step in the wrong direction. The Chaudière falls, like the whole Ottawa river watershed, are stolen Algonquin territory.  Both the natural beauty and the cultural significance are already marred by the Ring Dam and this will only be worsened by increased “development” on the Island.

Free The Chaudière Falls:

Before they were harnessed for industry, the Chaudière Falls were second only to Niagara, and many people considered them more interesting in their variety and setting. The main feature was the Big Kettle, where the waterfall came into almost a full circle. It’s a greater arc than Niagara’s Horseshoe Falls. Over millennia, the flow had worn the stone at the base into a great bowl. The water would swirl around and bubble up, and there would always be a mist. On a bright summer day, there would be at least one rainbow in it. Further towards the Quebec side was the Lost Chaudière, where the area was completely surrounded by stone. Much to the amazement of visitors, the water would flow in but wouldn’t come out again: It was travelling through an underground channel, reappearing further down the river.

Regarding William Commanda’s Legacy Vision for the Sacred Chaudiere Site:
https://ipsmo.wordpress.com/2014/06/22/william-commandas-vision-chaudiere/

Let the Chaudière fall – freely:
http://www.ottawacitizen.com/Chaudi%C3%A8re+fall+freely/9778425/story.html

Free The Falls by Albert Dumont:
http://albertdumont.com/free-the-falls/

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Regarding William Commanda’s Legacy Vision for the Sacred Chaudiere Site

June21doc-coanlogoJUNE 21, 2014 CIRCLE OF ALL NATIONS MESSAGE REGARDING WILLIAM COMMANDA’S LEGACY VISION FOR THE SACRED CHAUDIERE SITE – FROM ROMOLA V. THUMBADOO

Download the document here (25-pg pdf)

june21doc-gwcwwampumCONTENTS:

SECTION ONE – AN OPEN LETTER

  1. A Personal Preamble
  2. Open Letter on behalf of the Legacy Vision of Indigenous Spiritual Leader and Elder, Dr. William Commanda, OC, Carrier of the Sacred Wampum Belt Heritage

SECTION TWO – THE SACRED CHAUDIERE SITE AND VICTORIA ISLAND ISSUES PAPER – Key Information

  1. William Commanda – 11 November, 1913 – 3 August, 2011
  2. Sacred Cultural Heritage Site
  3. June21doc-overviewmapDevelopment of the Vision for the Sacred Chaudière Site
  4. The Sacred Chaudière Site and the vision and the commitment of three exemplary Indigenous rights leaders of international renown and relevance – William Commanda, Douglas Cardinal and Donald Marshall Junior
  5. Current Challenges
  6. A Critical Consideration – First Peoples/Canada Relations in 2014

SECTION THREE – THE LEGACY VISION FOR THE SACRED CHAUDIERE SITE

  1. Mandate
  2. The Core Vision (first presented in 2003)
  3. Critical Imperatives
  4. Expected Key Results

SECTION FOUR – AN INVITATION TO DREAM BIG TO SAFE GUARD AND ANIMATE THE LIVING LEGACY OF WILLIAM COMMANDA

  1. Blueprint for the future: William Commanda’s Legacy Vision for Asinabka in a Nutshell
  2. Recommendation/Exhortation

.

Download the document here (25-pg pdf)

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Journey of Nishiyuu – Youth walker/warriors arrive in Ottawa

Click photo for album of photos taken by Ben Powless.

 

Indigenous youth trekking to Ottawa from northern Quebec arrived by the hundreds on Monday, March 25. In mid January, six Cree youth from Whapmagoostui began a 1,600 kilometre “Quest of Wisjinichu-Nishiyuu”, a “Quest for Unity” as part of the burgeoning Idle No More movement. (read full article by Andy Crosby posted on ottawa.mediacoop.ca)

 

Check the official Journey of Nishiyuu website

 

Video of the final leg of the journey (7min)
(ends with speech by David Kawapit on Parliament Hill):

Celebrate the Arrival of MARCHE AMUN / AMUN MARCH

Update: check the link here - http://picasaweb.google.com/peiju.wang/MarcheAMUNByNikGehl# to see photos from the feast and rally by Nik Gehl

On June 1, 2010, after nearly one month of walking, the AMUN March will arrive on Parliament Hill to draw attention to ongoing legislative sexism in the Indian Act, and to call people of conscience to join the struggle against it.

AMUN March kicked off its 500 km march from Wendake, QC to the Parliament Hill in Ottawa on May 4, 2010 to pursue the fight that was undertaken by Sharon McIvor (see Sharon McIvor’s fight for gender equality in the Indian Act), and to request that the Canadian Government resolve the injustices created by the Indian Act.  The Government of Canada introduced Bill C-3 to bolster gender equity in the registration provisions of the Act.  However, this Bill is just another continued failed remedial legislation, it partially corrects discriminatory aspects of the Indian Act registration rules (See Sexist Bill C-3 is racist and fatally flawed).

Furthermore, the government of Canada failed to consult with Indigenous Peoples and accommodate their concerns prior to introducing Bill C-3, which violates Section 35 of Canadian Constitution Act of 1982.  Not only Bill C-3 does not end discrimination against Indigenous women and their descendants, it also does not address the underlying issue of the Indian Act – categorization of Indian status.  If Canada is SINCERE in its promise of reconciliation with Indigenous peoples following the Apology of June 11 2008 and in the recent Throne speech, Canada must recognize and respect the INHERENT RIGHT of Indigenous peoples to govern themselves, to define who can be a citizen of their nation.

Indigenous Peoples Solidarity Movement Ottawa is one of many groups, including the Native Women’s Association of Canada, and Québec Native Women Inc., calling allies to come out and greet the march as it arrives on Parliament Hill.

Community Feast to Welcome AMUN March

L to R: Vivane Michele, Danielle Guay, Sharon McIvor, and Michèle Audette with her son Yocoisse Sioui. Photographer Gwen Brodsky

6 PM Monday, May 31, 2010
Odawa Friendship Centre, 12 Stirling Ave.  Ottawa, Algonquin Territory
Everyone is Welcome to the fest!

Opening ceremony by Elder Annie St. Georges

Speakers:
Michèle Audette and Viviane Michel, Marche Amun Organizers,
Sharon McIvor,
Jeanette Corbiere Lavell, and
Lynn Gehl, Giizhigaate-Mnidoo-Kwe, Makinag Ndoo-dem

Rally & Press Conference

Tuesday, June 1, 2010

11:45 AM   Victoria Island
(end of Middle Street, off Chaudière Bridge, follow signs for “Aboriginal Experiences”)
EVERYONE IS WELCOME

12 PM    Welcome
Jeanette Corbiere Lavell, President of the Native Women’s Association of Canada
Michèle Audette and Viviane Michel, Marche Amun Organizers
Sharon McIvor, McIvor v. Canada
Dawn Harvard, President of the Ontario Native Women’s Association
Kathleen McHugh, Women’s Council Chair of the Assembly of First Nations

12:45    Closing

1-1:30 PM    Press Conference (Charles Lynch Room, 130S, Centre Block) ALL MEDIA WELCOME

Further Information

What to do:

Write to you MP and the key politicians below about your opposition to Bill C-3:

Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development, Chuck Strahl;
Opposition party leaders: Duceppe, Ignatieff and Layton;
Members of the Standing Committee on Aboriginal Affairs: Bruce Stanton, Rick Clarke, LaVar Payne, John Duncan, Earl Dreeshen, Greg RickfordAnita Neville, Todd Russell, Larry Bagnell (Liberals); Jean Crowder, Carol Hughes (NDP); Marc LeMay and Yvon Levesque (BQ).

BACKGROUND

The Federal Government had until April 6th, 2010 to amend the Indian Act, but requested the Court of Appeal of British Columbia an extension till July 5th, 2010. It must act. The Indian Act discriminates and marginalizes the Native Peoples since 1876. Ms Sharon McIvor, a Native woman from British Columbia, questioned in Court one of the discriminatory outcomes of this Act, that is the impossibility for a Mother to hand down the Native status to her grand-children when the father of the children is not Native, when this right is recognized for Native fathers in the same situation. It is thanks to 25 years of legal procedures that things will change.

However, the women will go on being subjected to discrimination in such domains as:

  • The Right to Indian status for themselves and their children (abolish categories)
  • The Right of Membership to the Band for themselves and their children;
  • Registration of children whose paternity is questioned or not recognized;
  • The Right to live in the reserve for themselves, their spouse and their children;
  • The clause on distribution of lands and services on the reserve;
  • Property division following a breach/break-up in the relationship;
  • The Right of Ottawa to determine who is Native

Through history, discrimination founded on sex towards women of First Nations becomes official as soon as 1868, legislative measures then enacting that the Indian status could be handed down only by men. A man who married a non-Native kept his Indian status conferred by the Indian Act, his wife and their children became Indians according to the Law. A woman from a First Nation who married a non-Native or a non-registered Indian lost her aboriginal and treaty rights, as did her children. In the Indian Act jargon, she lost her status.

It is to continue the struggle undertaken by Ms McIvor and request the Canadian Government to settle these injustices of the Indian Act that the AMUN March is held.

Francais

Le gouvernement fédéral avait jusqu’au 6 avril 2010 pour modifier la Loi sur les Indiens, mais a demandé une extension jusqu’au 5 juillet 2010 à la Cour d’appel de Colombie- Britannique. Il doit agir. La Loi sur les Indiens discrimine et marginalise les peuples autochtones depuis 1876. C’est ce qu’a décidé la Cour dans la cause de Mme Sharon McIvor, femme autochtone de la Colombie-Britannique qui a contesté l’un des effets discriminatoires de cette loi, soit l’impossibilité pour une mère de transmettre le statut autochtone à ses petits-enfants lorsque le père des enfants n’est pas autochtone, alors que ce droit est reconnu pour les pères autochtones dans la même situation. C’est grâce à plus de 25 ans de démarches légales que les choses vont changer.

Toutefois, les femmes continuent de subir la discrimination de la Loi sur les Indiens dans les domaines tels que:

  • Le droit au statut indien pour elles-mêmes et leurs enfants (abolition des catégories);
  • Le droit à l’appartenance à la bande pour elles-mêmes et leurs enfants;
  • L’inscription d’enfants dont la paternité est contestée ou non reconnue;
  • Le droit à résider dans la réserve pour elles-mêmes, leur conjoint et leurs enfants;
  • La clause de distribution de terrains et de services dans la réserve;
  • Le partage des biens suite à la rupture de la relation,
  • Le refus d’ajouter des nouveaux argents pour les nouvelles inscriptions,
  • Le droit exclusif d’Ottawa de déterminer qui est indien.

Dans l’histoire, la discrimination fondée sur le sexe à l’égard des femmes des Premières Nations devient officielle dès 1868, des mesures législatives décrétant alors que le statut d’Indien ne pouvait être transmis que par les hommes. Un homme qui mariait une nonautochtone conservait son statut d’indien conféré par la Loi sur les Indiens, sa femme et leurs enfants devenaient indiens au sens de la Loi. Une femme des PN qui mariait un non-autochtone ou un Indien non-inscrit perdait ses droits ancestraux et issus de traités, tout comme ses enfants! Dans le jargon de la Loi sur les Indiens, elle perdait son statut.

C’est pour continuer la lutte entreprise par Mme McIvor et demander au gouvernement canadien de régler ces injustices dans la Loi sur les Indiens que la Marche Amun aura lieu.

May 3rd: Anti-colonial walking tour of Ottawa

NO OLYMPICS ON STOLEN NATIVE LAND!

Sunday, May 3rd at 1:00pm
Near the statue of Champlain
Behind the National Gallery
(380 Sussex Drive)
Olympics Resistance Ottawa

On Sunday, May 3rd we will be going on an anti-colonial walking tour of Ottawa. We will be exploring Canada’s colonial legacy and the ongoing impact of colonization on “Ottawa”. In particular, we will be addressing the role that the Canadian government and transnational corporations are playing in the attacks on the environment, the elderly, people living in poverty, workers and migrant workers and indigenous people due to the 2010 Olympics in “B.C”.

This walk will focus on places in downtown Ottawa that are part of our pre-colonial past and our colonial present. We will talk about the little known history of different parts of Ottawa, how our colonial forebearers related to the land and the people living on the land, and how the Canadian government continues to relate to the land and the people, native and non-native. It will provide a critical perspective on the usual history of “Canada”.

The Eurocentric history that is taught in Canadian schools is a direct legacy of our colonial past and a source of on-going oppression of indigenous people in Canada. This walk is a creative and interactive way to encourage people to see the places where they live differently, to make visible the giant elephants in the room, or in this case, the city.

The walking tour will begin near the statue of the French colonialist Samuel Champlain. We will visit the Hudson’s Bay Company, Parliament Hill, the Olympic Clock, the Royal Bank of Canada, the Supreme Court, the Library and National Archives, Lebreton Flats, and Victoria Island/Chaudiere Falls.

This anti-colonial walking tour has been organized by Olympics Resistance Ottawa. ORO organizes in order to raise awareness about the destructive impacts of, and increase resistance to, the 2010 Olympics.

“Far from being simply about ‘sport’, the history of the Olympics is one rooted in displacement, corporate greed, fascism, repression, and violence. Only the political and corporate elite – from real estate developers to security corporations – have anything to gain from the Olympics industry. The effects of the upcoming Winter Games have already manifested themselves- with the expansion of sport tourism and resource extraction on indigenous lands; increasing homelessness and gentrification of poor neighbourhoods; increasing privatization of public services; union busting through imposed contracts and exploitative conditions especially for migrant labour; the fortification of the national security apparatus; ballooning public spending and public debt; and unprecedented destruction of the environment.”

http://www.no2010.com/node/941

We want to acknowledge the work and support of Jane’s Walk Ottawa.
http://www.janeswalkottawa.ca/