Thurs June 19 – Indigenous Resistance & Solidarity: Against Pipelines, For The Land – at the Mayfair Theatre

UPDATE:
here is the followup post from the event, with all the information and links of projects and upcoming events:
https://ipsmo.wordpress.com/2014/06/20/june19-followup/

 

In the lead-up to National Aboriginal Day (June 21), we’re happy to invite you to our exciting upcoming film night:

Indigenous Resistance and Solidarity
Against Pipelines, For The Land

Thursday June 19th, 6:30pm
at the Mayfair Theatre, 1074 Bank St
Ottawa (unceded Algonquin territory)

Additionally, from 8:45-10pm there will be an informal post-event social
Hosted by Southminster United Church (15 Aylmer Ave at Bank, one block from the theatre)

This event will feature four short films:

  • the new half-hour documentary being released this month about the Unist’ot’en resistance camp out in BC, that is blocking the construction of a number of pipelines and reasserting their Indigenous sovereignty.
  • a shorter film from 2013 that highlights cross-Canada Indigenous resistance to tar sands pipelines
  • video reporting of the police repression of anti-fracking protests in Elsipogtog last fall
  • an interview about anti-oppression, decolonization and responsible allyship from the 2012 PowerShift Canada climate justice conference(scroll down for full film titles / descriptions / preview links)

There will be an opening from Albert Dumont, “South Wind” (Algonquin, Kitigan Zibi)

We will also have speakers to profile local efforts and opportunities to get more involved.


We hope you’re excited too!

Here’s how you can to help support this event:

  • Mark your calendar and ask someone if they’d like to come with you!
  • If you’re on Facebook, invite 10 (or so) friends to the event
  • If you’ve got somewhere to put it, print out a poster (or 10)
  • Please share this link with your contacts

 

This event is hosted by us, IPSMO: Indigenous Peoples Solidarity Movement Ottawa, in partnership with Ecology Ottawa, the Peoples Social Forum, Council of Canadians, and CPAWS – Ottawa Valley (Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society).

There is a suggested donation of $5 – $15 at the door, as it is a fundraiser (but no one will be turned away for lack of funds). Monies raised will go to the Unist’ot’en camp as well as to the various filmmakers’ projects, and to Indigenous and solidarity participation in the Peoples Social Forum this August in Ottawa.

Hope to see you there!

 

Accessibility Notes:

  • The Mayfair Theatre has side entrances that are wheelchair accessible.
    The washrooms are not, but Shoppers Drug Mart (located next door) does have accessible washrooms.
  • Please refrain from wearing perfumes, colognes or other scented products
  • Please contact us if you require bus tickets

Contact: ipsmo@riseup.nethttp://www.ipsmo.org
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Films / descriptions / preview links:

RESIST: The Unist’ot’en’s Call to the Land (2014, 30min)
… is a documentary film that visits the fourth annual Environmental Action Camp, hosted on unceded Wet’suwet’en territory by the Unist’ot’en(C’ihlts’ehkhyu/Big Frog) clan. By re-instituting a Free, Prior, and Informed Consent Protocol on the bridge over Wedzin Kwah into their traditional territories, the Unist’ot’en are reasserting their indigenous sovereignty and standing up to industry and government who want to destroy their lands The focus of the film includes the exploration of the environmental, legal, and social issues surrounding hydraulic fracturing, tar sands, and the proposed Kinder-Morgan, Pacific Trails Pipeline, and Enbridge Northern Gateway Pipeline projects in British Columbia. The film’s themes also include indigenous sovereignty and decolonization, as well as documenting one of the most important resistance camps in North America and the movement it is a part of.
http://vimeo.com/74788986

Kahsatstenhsera: Indigenous Resistance to Tar Sands Pipelines (2013, 10min)
Kahsatstenhsera gah-sad-sdanh-se-ra is a Kanienkeha:ka (Mohawk) word that means Strength in Unity. This short documentary details contemporary Indigenous resistance to tar sands pipeline expansion, in particular the Line 9 and Energy East pipelines, which threaten the health of our territories in the northeast of Turtle Island. It includes the voices and perspectives of Dene, Wolastiqiyik, Mi’kmaq, Anishinaabe, Haudenosaunee and Wet’suwet’en land defenders.
http://reclaimturtleisland.com/videos/

Showdown at Highway 134 (2013, 5min)
With some of the only video from behind police lines, subMedia.tv witnessed the brutal raid by the Royal Colonial Mounted Police on the Mi’kmaq blockade of fracking equipment. But the fierce response of the community in defense of the warriors was also captured on camera. We bring you the real story about what really went down on Highway 134, the story that the corporate media doesn’t want you to see.
http://www.submedia.tv/showdown-at-highway-134/

Harsha Walia on Anti-Oppression, Decolonization and Responsible Allyship (2012, 10min)
“Given the devastating cultural, spiritual, economic, linguistic and political impacts of colonialism on Indigenous people in Canada, any serious attempt by non-natives at allying with Indigenous struggles must entail solidarity in the fight against colonization.” Recorded at the PowerShift Canada 2012 conference in Ottawa, unceded Algonquin territory.
https://ipsmo.wordpress.com/2012/11/01/harsha-walia-video-interview/

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Posters:
(please consider printing/displaying one or more posters
– be sure to check the box ‘fit/shrink to paper size’ when printing)

Facebook event page:
(if you’re on Facebook, please RSVP and invite your Ottawa friends)

Aug 24: Show Up, Shout Out and Shut Down the Tar Sands!

Show Up, Shout Out and Shut Down the Tar Sands!
Demonstration and Festivities

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Dundonald Park
(Somerset and Lyon)
Saturday, August 24, 2:00pm
Bring your banners, pots, pans, drums and whatever!

Organized by DecLine 9 Ottawa
This is not a permitted march

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Free Food and Drinks
There will be music and drumming

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Speakers:

Ben Powless (Mohawk), Ecology Ottawa
Vanessa Gray (Ojibway), Anti-Line 9 Organizer

Musicians:

Vela
Adam III

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On August 24th, land defenders, activists and allies are putting their bodies on the line by blockading Alberta’s Highway 63, which is the MAIN ARTERY that services the tar sands production sites north of Fort McMurray! They have made a call for an international day of action against the tar sands, and Decline 9 Ottawa is organizing a protest in solidarity with the blockaders.

It is essential to support the people who will be on Highway 63 this day, both to honour their actions and to let the authorities know that people across Turtle Island, and around the world will be watching
them.

We are everywhere! We want to build a world where everyone fits!

We want to celebrate all of the creative, beautiful and loving ways Indigenous and non-Indigenous people have been protecting Mother Earth, waters, animals and future generations. We will be coming together as a community, to show our solidarity with the protestors, and our commitment to building a better world together. We want a movement that is stronger in numbers, less apathetic, and more empathetic with each other and with the natural world.

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YouTube, “Shut Down the Tar Sands Highway”:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QGTQ2gI3pMk (Preview) (Preview)
Vancouver Media Co-operative, “Shut Down the Tar Sands Highway:
http://vancouver.mediacoop.ca/fr/video/shut-down-tar-sands-highway/18211

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Highway 63 is the main artery that services the Tar Sands production sites north of Fort McMurray. The Tar Sands are one of the most, if not THE most, environmentally destructive projects that exists today.

The Tar Sands exist due to the historic and ongoing colonization of Turtle Island (North America) and the Treaties made between the Canadian Government and Indigenous Nations. The Canadian government has never honoured the spirit in which the treaties were made, and in practice has unilaterally violated virtually all the agreements which it made.

We are all downstream from the tar sands, whether that’s literally or through exposures to the many pipelines that are being built to service tar sands industry. We are all effected: worker’s are forced
to work in dangerous and toxic environments; migrants workers are denied citizenship rights, super-exploited, segregated from and paid less than Canadian citizens, and often experience racism; women and women workers have said that they frequently experience physical and sexual violence; women who live close to the industries and refineries are subjected to dangerous toxins that damage their reproductive systems, and have more risks of miscarriage; children are born with birth defects, and have much higher instances of serious physical health issues; both children and adults in affected communities experience grave physical and mental health issues, including cancers, post traumatic stress, developmental disabilities; animals are disappearing, as more and more are being killed or chased away from their natural habitats.

It is important to remember that the ecological degradation wrought by the tar sands happens everyday, and that the scale of the destruction is so great, and with such dire impacts for everyone, especially the environment and directly effected communities, but also in terms of climate change and global warming, that the Tar Sands need to be a political priority for every person, and movement in Canada.

The movement against tar sands is at a critical juncture. Currently the expansion of the tar sands is being significantly impeded by the fierce resistance that pipelines have attracted continentwide. The industry’s difficulties in moving their product West and South has led to Enbridge’s Line 9 Reversal project and TransCanada’s Energy East Pipeline Project, both of which cut through Ontario & Quebec on their way to the East coast. The time has come for people in our region to come together, declaring that we will not be complicit in the exploitation of Mother Earth and that we do not want these pipelines carrying Tar Sands oil running through our communities.

Join us!

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This event has been endorsed by:

The Indigenous Peoples’ Solidarity Movement – Ottawa (IPSMO)
350 Ottawa

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For more information on:

Indigenous People: http://canadiandimension.com/articles/1760

Environment:
http://www.canadiangeographic.ca/magazine/jun08/feature_tar_sands.asp

Migrant workers:
http://oilsandstruth.org/increase-migrant-workers-canada-opens-door-abuses

Women: http://www.dominionpaper.ca/articles/1468

Racism:
http://oilsandstruth.org/racism-tar-sands-exploiting-foreign-workers-and-poisoning-indigenous-people

Children: http://thetyee.ca/News/2013/03/22/Alberta-Family-Flees-Oil-Sands/

Health: http://oilsandsrealitycheck.org/facts/human-rights-3/

Animals:
http://oilsandstruth.org/twomouthed-fish-discovered-near-alberta-tar-sands-two-stories

General: http://desmog.ca/2013/05/15/10-reasons-canada-rethink-tar-sands

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Tues 4pm Nov 27 – Ottawa Solidarity Rally with Unis’tot’en and Grassroot Wet’suwet’en

 

Ottawa Solidarity Rally with Unis’tot’en and Grassroot Wet’suwet’en

Tuesday November 27th, 2012 @ 4pm, 

Prime Minister’s Office (corner of Wellington & Elgin)

FB event: https://www.facebook.com/events/497971450224037/

#nopipelines

This Tuesday, November 27th, communities from coast to coast are taking action in solidarity with the Unis’tot’en and grassroots Wet’suwet’en, to reaffirm and amplify the message that no proposed pipelines will proceed on their territories!
No to PTP! No to all pipelines on Unis’tot’en land!

On November 20th, Wet’suwet’en Hereditary Chief Toghestiy intercepted and issued an eagle feather to surveyors from the Can-Am Geomatics company who were working for Apache’s proposed natural gas Pacific Trails Pipeline (PTP). In Wet’suwet’en law, an eagle feather is used as a first and only notice of trespass. The surveyors were ordered to leave the territory and the road leading into the territory has been closed to all industry activities. The Unist’ot’en are against all pipelines slated to cross through their territories, which include Enbridge Northern Gateway, Kinder Morgans northern proposal, Pembina, Spectra, and Pacific Trails Pipelines.

The Unis’tot’en are now calling for solidarity and support actions to get the message out loud and clear to corporations, investors, and government that they have no right or jurisdiction to approve development on Unist’ot’en lands.

So this Tuesday, November 27th, on unceded Algonquin territory, join in solidarity and resistance with Unist’ot’en in front of the PMO (Wellington and Elgin). Let’s tell them that we support Unist’ot’en and grassroots Wet’suwet’en and say no to all pipelines slated for their territories!

Bring banners, signs, noisemakers to make our voices loud and clear and reaffirm our solidarity with Unis’tot’en!

Invite friends and allies and help spread the word!

Let us know asap if you can help support and organize:
email stan.kupferschmidt at gmail.com or lena at lena.ca

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For more information please see links below:

The Unist’ot’en website, including news releases, backgrounder, and videos from latest events: http://unistotencamp.wordpress.com/

BC First Nation members evict pipeline surveyors:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/british-columbia/bc-first-nation-members-evict-pipeline-surveyors-set-up-road-block/article5547325/

Raising Resistance – Global Action Solidarity with Unis’tot’en: https://www.facebook.com/events/279802322123507/

Pamphlet to print and handout: http://unistotencamp.files.wordpress.com/2012/11/ptp-flyer2.pdf

Feb 13 – Action against the Olympics and Tar Sands

Action against the Olympics and Tar Sands

11:00am, Sat Feb 13
Ottawa – starting at the Olympic Clock

(Wellington at Metcalfe, across from the Parliament Buildings)
we will be at the clock for at least a half-hour, after which we may move on to other location(s)

We are choosing to interact in the street with our fellow citizens on this day, to help raise awareness of the effects of both the Olympics and Tar Sands.

We will be starting conversations and distributing literature – we have copies of the Dominion issue on the Olympics, flyers on both the Tar Sands and the Olympics, and even awesome stickers, to pass out to people who take an interest.

Please consider joining us in this effort to reach out to those who may be under the spell of the massive efforts to promote the Olypmics and the Tar Sands as projects that Canadians should take national pride in.

We are holding this action in response to a call for solidarity actions to take place across the country on this day, put out by Indigenous Environmental Network, Rainforest Action Network, Oilsandstruth, UK Tar Sands Network and many more…

For more information on the issues and to see full callout, please see:
http://linchpin.ca/English/Call-Feb-13-actions-tar-sands-olympics

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Ottawa action organized by IPSMO – Indigenous Peoples Solidarity Movement Ottawa – www.ipsmo.orgipsmo@riseup.net

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and please note: the Decolonial Study Group that was scheduled for Feb 13 has been postponed
>> stay tuned for an announcement of when it will be taking place instead

Film screening: H2Oil

Film Screening: H2Oil
‘Because the Tar Sands and Water Don’t Mix’
Presented by Polaris Insitute
Endorsed by IPSMO

The Film will be screened 4 times at the Mayfair Theatre:

  • Friday, November 27th at 7:00PM
  • Saturday, November 28th at 7:00PM – ***Please note that neither Tony (Polaris) nor Clayton (IEN) will be able to attend this evening’s screening as initially planned. Clayton will however be available on Sunday, November 29th***
  • Sunday, November 29th at 7:00PM – ***Clayton Thomas-Muller from the Indigenous Environmental Network will be available for a Q & A session after the screening***
  • Monday, November 30th at 7:00PM

Admission will be:
MayFair Members $5.00
Non-Members $9.00
Seniors & Children $6.00

ABOUT THE FILM

Ever wonder where American gets most of its oil? If you thought it was Saudi Arabia or Iraq you are wrong. America’s biggest oil supplier has quickly become Canada’s oil sands. Located under Alberta’s pristine boreal forests, the process of oil sands extraction uses up to 4 barrels of fresh water to produce only one barrel of crude oil.

H2Oil follows a voyage of discovery, heartbreak and politicization in the stories of those attempting to defend water in Alberta against tar sands expansion. Unlikely alliances are built and lives are changed as they come up against the largest industrial project in human history.

Ultimately we ask what is more important, oil or water? And what will be our response?

With hope and courage H2Oil tells the story of one of the most significant, and destructive projects of our time.

Wed Oct 28: Frontiers of Resistance

Wed Oct 28

Schedule change:

  • 5:00pm – Ellen Gabriel will speak
  • followed by the film, Kahnesatake: 270 Years of Resistance
  • approx 7:30speakers on Beaver Lake Cree Nation and the Tar Sands: Garry Benson and Jack Woodward

at St. Joseph’s Church, 151 Laurier Ave E. (at Cumberland) [Hall entrance at 174 Wilbrod St]

Presenters:

  • Ellen Gabriel of Kahnesatake Nation has traveled across Canada, the Hague in Holland as well as to Strasbourg, France in 1990 to address the European Parliament on the human rights violations that occurred during the “Oka Crisis”.  She also traveled to Japan to educate people about the events in her community during 1990 and to sensitize the public on the history, culture and identity of Aboriginal people. Ellen believes that education is one of the key factors for Aboriginal people to overcome oppression and the effects of colonization while still maintaining our languages, cultures and traditions. In October of 2004, Ellen was elected president of Quebec Native Women Inc.  It is a position she is honored to uphold given the legacy of strong, intelligent Aboriginal women whose tenacity brought about changes to the Indian Act in the form of Bill C-31.
  • Garry Benson of Kelowna is a member of Beaver Lake Cree Nation and a senior partner with Benson Salloum Watts LLP, where he represents financial institutions, Aboriginal organizations and development projects. He has participated in negotiations involving Aboriginal people at the local, provincial and national level. He served as principal negotiator for the Metis Nation British Columbia and lead counsel for the Beaver Lake Cree Nation.
  • Jack Woodward is one of Canada’s pre-eminent practitioners of Aboriginal Law.  Jack has been practicing law since 1979, and literally wrote the book on Aboriginal law: Native Law, Canada’s leading text on the subject. Jack has a significant track record: he stopped clear cut logging on Meares Island in the mid-1980s, and won the first Aboriginal title claim in British Columbia since the Delgamuukw ruling.  Now, following on the heels of the Tsilhqot’in Nation v. British Columbia victory, Jack has embarked on another monumental challenge. This time he is determined to help stop the ecologically disastrous expansion of the tar sands.