le 3 janvier 2017 – Solidarité à Val d’Or avec les femmes authochtones

(ENGLISH FOLLOWS) En réponse aux poursuites de 2,3 millions entamées par 41 policiers de Val d’Or contre ICI Radio-Canada pour avoir couvert les accusations des femmes autochtones de 37 cas d’agressions sexuelles, une démonstration aura lieu à la station de police de Val d’Or le 3 janvier 2017. Cette démonstration servira aussi de réponse à la récente marche en support aux dit policiers, impliquant quelques citoyens de Val d’Or.

QUOI : Blancs (et autres) en solidarité avec les femmes autochtones
QUAND : Mardi 3 janvier 2017, 11h30am-1h00pm
OU : Val d’Or –1151 rue d’Escale (en dehors de la station de police)
POURQUOI : Démontrer notre support envers les autochtones qui ont dénoncées les injustices

  • Des lettres de support envoyées par différentes personnes ou organisations à travers du Canada seron lues sur place.
  • La démonstration demande spécifiquement aux blancs de démontrer leur support avec les femmes autochtones.
  • Le thème de démonstration assertera que :
    o Nous croyons les femmes autochtones et dénonçons la culture du viol qui laisse la vaste majorité des agressions sexuelles jamais dénoncées et/ou impunies.
    o Que la violence policière contre les personnes autochtones, peu importe la forme qu’elle prend, est une manifestation contemporaine de la suprématie blanche et du colonialisme d’occupation dans le présent.
    o Qu’il y a des alliés non-autochtones qui suivent et dénoncent ces injustices partout au Canada

CONTACT: Trycia Bazinet tryciabazinet@gmail.com

Facebook for live video and more information: @IPSMO (Indigenous People’s Solidarity Movement Ottawa
Page de l’évènement : https://www.facebook.com/events/1689759581338008/

January 3, 2017 – Solidarity in Val d’Or with Indigenous Women

In response to the lawsuit launched by 41 police officers against the news outlet (ICI Radio-Canada) that aired the testimonies of Indigenous women denouncing sexual assault (37 cases recorded), a demonstration will take place at the Val d’Or police station on January 3rd 2017. This demonstration is also a response to the citizen’s march in support of police officers, which recently took place in Val d’Or.

WHAT: Non-native Solidarity rally for Indigenous women attacked by police in Val d’Or
WHEN: Tuesday January 3rd (2017) 11:30am – 1:00pm
WHERE: Val d’Or – 1151 rue d’Escale (outside the police station)
WHO: Non-native (especially whites) in support of those confronting and exposing mistreatment by police
WHY: To show support for those risking their own safety to stand up for justice

  • Letters of support, sent by various individuals and organizations, will be read on spot.
  • Main messages of the rally:
    o We believe Indigenous women and denounced rape culture, which results in the the vast majority of sexual assaults of ever being denounced and/or punished.
    o That police violence against Indigenous peoples, in whichever forms it takes, is a contemporary manifestation of white supremacy and ongoing colonialism of occupation.
    o There are allies all accross Canada following this case and denouncing the injustices

CONTACT : Rally coordinator Trycia Bazinet tryciabazinet@gmail.com

Facebook for live video and more information: @IPSMO (Indigenous People’s Solidarity Movement Ottawa)
Facebook event page : https://www.facebook.com/events/1689759581338008/

jan3-valdor

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Ottawa Fundraising Dinner, Tues Nov 8- Algonquins of Barriere Lake Land Defenders

No Mining In Our Territory – Ottawa Fundraising Dinner
Algonquins of Barriere Lake Land Defenders Camp

Please join us this Tuesday to gather together for a dinner and opportunity to hear from Barriere Lake community members about their new efforts to prevent mining in their territory, and how you can support these efforts.

In late October, the Algonquins of Barriere Lake set up a camp to defend their territory from new threats of the various companies that have mining claims there. The Quebec government has recently begun unilaterally lifting multi-year moratoriums on mining in the area, despite this being against the Trilateral and Bilateral Agreements of the 1990s.
More info: http://www.barrierelakesolidarity.org/
http://www.greenpeace.org/canada/en/blog/Blogentry/mining-without-consent-of-the-algonquins-of-b/blog/57914/

Tuesday, November 8th 2016
5pm – 7pm  (come as you can, even if not right at 5pm)
at St. John’s Church, 154 Somerset St W. (corner of Elgin)
– Basement hall: entrance off of Somerset, wheelchair accessible entrance ramp off of Elgin.

Due to too short notice, we have not arranged ASL sign language interpretation. Please contact us with any other questions about accessibility or otherwise: indigsol@riseup.net

Planned food includes wild game and/or fish from ABL territory, with vegetarian chili, quinoa, and salad generously provided by the Table Restaurant.

All levels of donations accepted – to go to maintaining the camp and for gas for travel monitoring the various areas of the territory where drilling/mining companies may start work. By cash or cheque. Donations are also accepted via paypal.

This event has been very quickly organized so we need your help to please get the word out and encourage your fam/friends/comrades/networks to show up. The land defenders camp has just been started within the last two weeks, and this fundraising dinner is timed to coincide with the “Joining Our Fires: Women for the Protection of Lands and Waters” rally happening directly afterwards at 7pm, at the Human Rights Monument (Elgin at Lisgar: 3 blocks from our venue).

URGENT CALL FOR SUPPORT: Punishment for Failure to Submit to First Nations Financial Transparency Act?

 

Indian Affairs Push Algonquin Families of Barriere Lake to the Brink of Starvation; Food and Cash Needed

 

Photo of forest with sunlight
The Barriere Lake Algonquins live on approximately 17,000 square kms of unceded territory 4 hours north of Ottawa in Quebec.

For the last three months, the Department of Aboriginal Affairs has refused to issue social assistance cheques to 15 Algonquin families at Barriere Lake. This has affected between 50-60 people, including 25 children. Aboriginal Affairs is aware of the situation, but has failed to intervene.

The Chief and Council at Barriere Lake are questioning whether the band’s non-compliance with the First Nations Financial Transparency Act is behind this brutal denial of social assistance funds.

The Chief and Council at Barriere Lake have not submitted the consolidated financial statements required by the Transparency Act in protest of the band’s lack of control over band spending. As punishment for non-compliance, the Chief and a member of Council have not been paid for their work since November 27, 2014.

Barriere Lake has been under “Third Party Management” since 2006, which authorizes external accountants hired by Aboriginal Affairs to take over discretion of band finances and spending.

As winter sets in and the Christmas season is upon us, it is extremely difficult for these families and for the band’s governing body to survive without any other source of income. We are calling communities near and far to provide immediate support for Barriere Lake in this time of need.

 

What is needed?

Needed: Flour, baking powder, vegetable oil, rice, tomato soup, canned whole tomatoes, salt, pepper, cereals, eggs, porridge, macaroni, pasta, pasta sauce, white bread, chicken and beef broth, white beans, canned beans, margarine, potatoes (at least 200 pounds), pancake mix, syrup, dried peas, mac and cheese. Any other canned goods and dry goods that are common consumables and non-perishable.

If you are in Ottawa, please bring contributions to First United Church at 347 Richmond Road between 9:30 AM and 3:30 PM, December 21 – 27. Before delivering any contributions, please call the church at 613-­232­-1016 or if there is no answer call 613­729-­2647 to let them know you are coming. Please take the goods to the back of the Church off Madison Ave (one block north of Richmond).

You may still donate funds to the general Barriere Lake Solidarity fund, through PayPal: https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=Q22YF238ACE5N

You can also send the Minister of Aboriginal Affairs, Bernard Valcourt, a strong message through his website: http://www.bernardvalcourtmp.ca/contact/

Insist that (1) all social assistance payments – including back payments – are made immediately, and that the Department will work with the Chief and Council to ensure that no further payments are withheld; and (2) that the Federal Government meet Barriere Lake’s following demands, regarding the Transparency Act:

– Chief and Council must be free to appoint a fully qualified auditor of their own choosing;

– Chief and Council must have a decisive say over what is included in the audit;

– A fair and transparent dispute resolution process must be initiated to deal with the transactions that the Third Party Manager and Aboriginal Affairs have undertaken to date without the band’s involvement or approval.

 

Thank you / Migwetch

 

July 1: Akwesasne car caravan

Support the Mohawks of Akwesasne! Car Caravan to Akwesasne on July 1st

Car Caravan to Akwesasne
Wednesday, July 1st
Leaving Ottawa at 10:00am
ipsmo@riseup.net

On July 1st people from around “Ontario” will be heading to Akwesasne in support of the Mohawk community’s resistance to the arming of the Canadian Border Service Agency on June 1st.

On June 1st, Canadian Border Services Agency (CBSA) border guards were scheduled to carry sidearms, but community resistance resulted in the closing of the border by the Canadian government.  Since then, the Mohawk Community of Akwesasne continues to resist the imposition of armed border guards by the CBSA.

The caravan from Ottawa will be leaving at 10:00am.  If you want to come down, contact us at: ipsmo@riseup.net

If you have a vehicle, and you want to take people down, contact us at: ipsmo@riseup.net

Community members have emphasized that it is important for supporters not to escalate the situation.

In Quotes:

“What the border has done to far too many of our First Nations communities is horrific and atrocious on so many levels — and it has poisoned our minds to think in singular factions, instead of a full circle…Which way is going to best resolve this situation I’m not sure of yet but I do know we have a right to stand up for our own community, which will never solely be in Canada or the United States. We belong to Mother Earth in whom no one has claim over – and where there aren’t any borders.” – Jessica Yee, Kanionke:haka (writing in rabble.ca, June 5, 2009)

“When the people make their decision, that’s what needs to be carried out, and the people have made their decision: there will be no firearms carried by customs agents on our territory.” — Sakoietah, member of the Men’s Traditional Council at Akwesasne (in an interview with No One Is Illegal Radio, June 4, 2009)

“[The Canadian Border Service Agency] is a foreign oppressive force who occupies our sovereign community and territory. (They are) unwelcome, uninvited and now carrying firearms. For lack of a different description, that is considered by some an act of war.” – Larry King, member of the Akwesasne Mohawk Territory (quoted in the Ottawa Citizen, May 29, 2009)

“They’ll have to accept armed border officers there.” – Peter Van Loan, Canadian Minister of Public Safety, responsible for the Canadian Border Services Agency (quoted by Canadian Press, June 7, 2009)

BACKGROUND INFORMATION

– CBSA agents were due to be armed at the Port of Cornwall (Kahwehnoke) crossing on June 1 2009, a policy universally opposed and condemned by the Akwesasne Mohawk Community –

[CBSA press release (May 9, 2009): http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/media/release-communique/2009/2009-05-09-eng.html]

The Mohawk territory of Akwesasne straddles the jurisdictions of Ontario, Quebec and New York State, and is a major international border crossing between Canada and the United States. Canadian Border Service Agency (CBSA) guards began arming in 2007, and there are currently more than 800 armed CBSA guards across Canada. The entire CBSA aims to be armed, in stages, by 2016. The CBSA announced that their agents at the Port of Entry at Cornwall (at Akwesasne) would be armed by June 1 of 2009.

As written in Mohawk Nation News on May 3, 2009: “For the next month Mohawks of Akwesasne will be protesting colonial Canadian border guards arming themselves with Beretta 9 mm handguns in the middle of our community. They hope to start on June 1. Akwesasne is on both sides of the foreign Canada-U.S. border and home to the whole community regardless of this imaginary line… A letter was sent to Prime Minister Stephen Harper to have meetings with Public Safety Minister Peter Van Loan and his predecessor Stockwell Day over a year ago. There has been no response. We hear that the European settler experience at the border is completely different. They are often waved through without harassment.” (For full article visit: http://noii-van.resist.ca/?p=1076)

The Mohawk Council of Akwesasne passed resolution #318 on February 28, 2008 forbidding firearms to be carried by Canada Border Services Agents CBSA on the territory of Akwesasne.

On May 8, 2009 over 250 Mohawks marched on the U.S.-Canada border. As written in Mohawk Nation News: “We are the most policed people in the world. Almost 20 U.S. and Canadian enforcement agencies traverse our community.” Daily disagreements have been instigated against Mohawks who must pass through the checkpoint on a daily basis. There have been serious injuries, hospitalizations, charges and assaults. So far there have been no fatalities. There has been a steady increase in racial profiling and slurs direct at us sanctioned by Canada. Incidents are being provoked to justify armed guards. Hundreds of complaints have been filed with the Mohawk Council of Akwesasne, Canada Justice Department and the Canadian Human Rights Commission. No peaceful resolution has come forward.”

During the month of May, the community attempted to pressure and negotiate with the federal government and lobby at the international level. On May 26, 2009 Cornwall city council passed a resolution that no guns should be given to the CBSA guards. On May 28, 2009 Skarohreh Doug Anderson of the Haudenosaunee Confederacy presented a request to the Secretary of the UN Security Council to ask the UN to send officials to Akwesasne. Kenneth Deer of Kahnawake raised the issue of guns at Akwesasne with the Permanent Forum on Indigenous People.

Excerpt of statement to Secretary of the UN Security Council in New York: “On June 1 the Canada Border Services Agency guards will try to carry 9mm Berettas, which are meant to kill people. The UN must stop this attempt at ethnic cleansing at Akwesasne. Canada at the behest of the U.S. is trying to commit genocide on us, the real people of mother earth. The reasonable decision of the Haudenosaunee, our friends and supporters, is that there should be no guns anywhere on the Canada-U.S. border on the Canadian side. Canada is setting a precedent that any visitor arriving will have the barrel of a gun in their faces, so to say. We want the border station to be removed from the middle of Akwesasne. We know the power they presently exercise without the guns. They ridicule and demean us as we come through the border. They use their power of intimidation to pull us into their building away from the protective eyes of our friends and relatives. We have no choice but to cross many times a day to carry on our normal lives. The violence will always be directed at us and not at them. We want peace. These supposed peace officers are acting like war zone combatants. What a contradictory message Canada sends out to the world.”

The Akwesasne Mohawk Council Chiefs offered several compromise positions to senior Canada Border Services Agency officials during a meeting in Ottawa, but were rebuffed on May 28, 2009, according to Chief Larry King. During the Ottawa meeting, the chiefs unsuccessfully asked that the move be delayed for at least a year or until the end of CBSA’s arming process in 2016 to allow more time for community consultations as well as time for officers to be trained in cultural sensitivity by the community. The meeting ended with a declaration from CBSA president Stephen Rigby that our position is what it is; to which the chiefs responded, whatever happens will happen said King. (Source: http://www.ottawacitizen.com/Armed+border+guards/1644877/story.html)

SOME ADDITIONAL HISTORY AND BACKGROUND:

-> Many members of the Akwesasne community currently opposing armed border guards have referenced the story of Saiowisakeron (Jake Ice), a traditional Mohawk man who was shot and killed by Dominion police in 1899. There is a statue of Jake Ice at Akwesasne, which has become a focal point to express opposition to armed border agents. More information about Jake Ice available here: www.wampumchronicles.com/saiowisakeron.html

-> In 1968, members of the community blocked the border-crossing bridge against the policy that forced Akwesasne residents to pay duty on purchases they made in the United States, despite the fact that the Jay Treaty of 1794, also known as the “Treaty of Amity, Commerce and Navigation” affirmed that they were not required to do so. An NFB documentary by Mort Ransen is available online at: http://intercontinentalcry.org/you-are-on-indian-land/

For an extensive backgrounder, read “Forty-one year legacy of Mohawk resistance at Akwesasne border” by Mohawk Nation News.

-> June 2008: Mohawk grandmothers attacked by CBSA guards; more info here: http://nooneisillegal-montreal.blogspot.com/2008/06/cbsa-attack.html

-> Katenies, a member of the Akwesasne community, has openly challenged the colonial “Canada-US” border. She refuses to recognize the authority of the Canadian courts to judge her for “border violations”.  Article/Audio compilation here: http://nooneisillegal-montreal.blogspot.com/2008/06/katenies-cbsa-background.html

[Information compiled by Harsha (No One Is Illegal-Vancouver) & Jaggi (No One Is Illegal-Montreal). Please send information for future updates to BOTH noii-van@resist.ca AND nooneisillegal@gmail.com]

Update re:Peru situation

NEW!

AND – NEW NOTICE – Protest at Peruvian Embassy, 130 Albert St, on THURSDAY JUNE 18 beginning at 11:30 – see you there!

PLUS – contact Canadian senators and urge them to block Bill C-24, the law to implement Canada-Peru Free Trade Agreement:  http://www.canadians.org/action/2009/11-June-09.html

Canadian actions:

OTTAWA: Demonstration and information picket
Thursday June 11 11:30-1:30
In front of Peruvian Embassy
130 Albert between O´Connor and Metcalfe
ipsmo@riseup.nethttps://ipsmo.wordpress.com
Note: Organizations endorsing the four demands on the Peruvian government include: Common Cause Ottawa; Common Frontiers; Council of Canadians; MiningWatch Canada; OPIRG/GRIPO-Ottawa; Ottawa-Outaouais Industrial Workers of the World (IWW); Rights Action; Students Against Israeli Apartheid -Carleton (SAIA); and Indigenous Peoples Solidarity Movement -Ottawa.

TORONTO Protest activity
Thursday, June 11, 1pm
Consulate of Peru, Toronto
10 St. Mary’s St. (just south of Bloor St. at Yonge)
More info: Carlos Torchia, Coordinator, Latin American Solidarity Network-Toronto, torontoboliviasolidarity@gmail.com

MONTREAL: Demonstration for Life in Bagua
Friday, June 12
12:00 Noon / à midi
Peruvian Consulate
550 Sherbrooke West,
Metro McGill
Organized by: Action Créative, Société Bolivarienne du Québec, Hands Off Venezuela et Mohawk Traditional Council of Kahnawake

PETITIONS:
http://www.avaaz.org/en/peru_stop_violence/?cl=250248179&v=3461
http://www.ipetitions.com/petition/Amazon/index.html

FACEBOOK GROUP: Solidarity With Peru
http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=89605273186

ARTICLES/WEBSITES:
* Reports by Ben Powless, IPSMO member currently in Peru
http://rabble.ca/taxonomy/term/2686
* In depth analysis of the situation, by Gerardo Rénique:
https://nacla.org/node/5879
* News from AmazonWatch.org – includes action items
http://www.amazonwatch.org/peru-protests.php
MESSAGE FROM BOB LOVELACE:

Another Day in the – Life of Peru and Canada
June 10th

While in the Amazon region of Ecuador a few weeks ago I wrote to a friend, “At least now I can say that I have seen the Garden of Eden”. My worst fear, the gnawing secret I would not have dared to breathe, was that the beautiful courageous people that we met and shared stories with would one day be murdered for their land and the hidden metals of which they had no need of themselves. Just over the hills was Peru. As I looked south I had wondered who lived there. Now I know.

In the last six days we have learned who lives there. Mostly they are indigenous people whose genes have flowed through the region as long as the rivers have. They are not poor, because they are at home, because they are among their families and clans, because they walk in the footsteps of their ancestors, because the land that has sustained hundreds of generations will continue to care for them. They are frightened now. Six days ago they were worried that their land would be destroyed; now they fear that everything will perish. They are courageous. They do not hide when the helicopters fly over. They watch them come and go. And they will watch them go, watch them go.

Tomorrow will be the seventh day. Tomorrow, Thursday June 11th, our job is to make the world aware of what has happened in Peru. In Ottawa, we will be at the Peruvian Embassy. In Toronto, we will be at the Peruvian Consulate. Where ever you are tomorrow you must make your voice heard. Call your local Canadian Bank and tell them to stop investing in extractive industries, mining, drilling, forestry and agri-business that are overlooking or participating in human rights abuses. Call your local MP and MPP and tell them that you are tired of them selling your soul for an economy that places so little value on human life. Call your neighbour and ask them to join you in denouncing the media for keeping you ignorant of the truth that Canada is complicit, as a free trade partner, in the murder of people this week in Peru.

You see, we can do something. We may not be on the frontline but we can make a difference. We can save lives by making our names, faces and attitudes known. If you have a camera, take pictures at a demonstration, of yourself and friends holding signs, of sidewalk chalk messages that you write on Bay Street, use your imagination and then post those pictures on the web where people in Peru can see them. Tell them with pictures that they are not alone. And then send those pictures to the politicians and to the mining companies and to the Banks, to the US Embassy, the Peruvian Embassy, so that they will know that our brothers and sisters in Peru are not alone. You are not alone.

We can also share our wealth or a portion of our poverty with indigenous people in Peru. They can use it right now.

I have spoken with Grahame Russell of Rights Action (Canada). Rights Action is an NGO that works primarily in Central America with communities opposing mining and resource extraction. Grahame has agreed that 100% of the donations that are made to Rights Action in the name of “current conflict in Peru” will go directly to indigenous peoples’ organizations in the affected area. I will work with my contacts in Ecuador and Peru to direct the money where it will do the most good. Please encourage people on your e-lists to give something to support healing for people in Peru. And please give something yourself.

TO MAKE TAX-DEDUCTIBLE DONATIONS for indigenous organizations in Peru resisting the harms of large-scale “development” projects (mining, tourism, hydro-electric dams) and promoting their own development, human rights and environment projects, make check payable to “Rights Action” and mail to:

* CANADA: 552 – 351 Queen St. E, Toronto ON, M5A-1T8
* UNITED STATES: Box 50887, Washington DC, 20091-0887

CREDIT-CARD DONATIONS: http://rightsaction.org/contributions.htm

NB – Write “Peru–Indigenous Rights” on the cheque’s memo line, or in the appropriate field of the on-line credit card donations. This will ensure that every dollar you donate will go directly to the people it is intended to help.

Questions? Contact Grahame Russell, director, info@rightsaction.org, 1-860-751-4285

The Ben Powless Interview on CBC, “The Current” has been switched to Friday morning. Get in and listen because Ben is now at Pagua, Peru conducting interviews and helping search for evidence.

Support those demonstrations tomorrow. I will see you there!

Please forward this email to all of your e-lists. Since mainstream media is playing this down or not even present we need to be the news.

Migwetch,
In peace and Friendship,

Robert Lovelace

May 30: The Haudenosaunee Men’s Fire Speaking in Ottawa

The Haudenosaunee Men’s Fire Speaking in Ottawa

Saturday, May 30th
2:00pm in Room 202
Jack Purcell Community Centre
320 Jack Purcell Lane (near corner of Elgin & Gilmour)
Pay What You Can
ipsmo@riseup.net
https://ipsmo.wordpress.com

The Hosgenegehta [Haudenosaunee Men’s Fire] Speaking in Ottawa
Phillip Skye will be speaking for the men’s fire

Ever since the level of activity at the reclamation site at Caledonia diminished about a year ago, many non-native supporters have been unclear about how to build ongoing links in solidarity with the Six Nations struggle.

Unfortunately, while many non-native supporters were quite familiar with the reclamation, very few people in our community – including those who are more politically active – seem to know anything about the dozens of developments that have been blocked in Brantford, or how to support those people facing legal charges from their activity in defending Six Nations land and the environment that we all share.

The event will be used as a way to raise awareness and funds for the work by the Men’s Fire to halt development on the Haldimand tract and to support the legal costs of the more than 100 people who have been criminally charged for defending their land rights.