April 22 – HONOUR YOUR WORD: Celebrating the Defense of Mother Earth!

 

Click image to print poster
Click image to print poster
Movie Screening and Fund Raiser for the Algonquins of Barriere Lake

With special guests: Barriere Lake community members including Norm Matchewan and Elder Michel Thusky, and (via Skype) filmmaker Martha Stiegman

Tuesday, April 22 at 6:30pm (doors 6pm)
at the Mayfair Theatre
1074 Bank St. (near Sunnyside)
Buses # 1 & 7 (Bank) or # 5 (Riverdale)

$5-15 suggested donation
(no one turned away for lack of funds)
Fundraiser for Barriere Lake: Click to donate

 

Honour Your Word is a new documentary film – an intimate portrait of life behind the barricades for the Algonquins of Barriere Lake, an inspiring First Nation whose dignity and courage contrast sharply with the political injustice they face.
 

Presented in Ottawa by the Indigenous Peoples Solidarity Movement Ottawa, with Diffusion Multi-Monde and co-sponsors MiningWatch Canada, OPIRG-Carleton, OPIRG/GRIPO-Ottawa and OSSTF District-25 Human Rights / Status of Women Committee.

 

Honour Your Word – trailer
 

 

9-minute interview with filmmaker Martha Stiegman, from CHUO 89.1FM radio show Click Here with host Mitchell Caplan:
 

 

Accessibility Notes:

  • The Mayfair Theatre has side entrances that are wheelchair accessible.
    The washrooms are not, but Shoppers Drug Mart (located next door) does have accessible washrooms.
  • Please refrain from wearing perfumes, colognes or other scented products
  • Please contact us if you require ASL/LSQ
  • Please contact us if you require bus tickets

Contact: ipsmo@riseup.net – www.ipsmo.org
 

Please help us promote this event!

 
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Celebrating the Defense of Mother Earth!

This movie screening of Honour Your Word is the IPSM Ottawa’s 3rd “Earth Day” event Celebrating the Defense of Mother Earth!

Last year we were honoured to work with Defenders of the Land and Land Defenders from Six Nations and we raised $1405 for the legal defense of activists from Six Nations, and in 2009 we organized our 1st event with Minwaashin Lodge, the Tungasuvvingat Inuit, and others.

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More about the movie – Honour Your Word (2013, 59min):

New Algonquin leaders are followed as their community fights to protect their land, their way of life and their language.

The title refers to the Algonquins of Barriere Lake’s campaign slogan demanding Canada and Quebec honour a precedent-setting conservation deal signed in 1991. Director Martha Stiegman spent four years shooting this poetic, heartfelt documentary that challenges stereotypes of “angry Indians.” Honour Your Word juxtaposes starkly contrasting landscapes—the majesty of the bush, a dramatic highway stand-off against a riot squad, daily life within the confines of the reserve—to reveal the spirit of a people for whom blockading has become a part of their way of life, a life rooted in the forest they are defending.

For more information:

 
 

July 24-28: Asinabka Film & Media Arts Festival comes to Ottawa for the second year!


 

The Asinabka Film & Media Arts Festival – http://asinabkafestival.org – is bringing powerful and thought-provoking art and film to Ottawa for another summer. The Festival, to be held July 24-28 2013, provides an opportunity for Indigenous peoples to tell their own stories and showcase their rich and vibrant culture in the National Capital Region.

This year, the Festival will feature a wide array of programming, including a series of films that examine deep spiritual connections to the land and the important role that women play in Aboriginal communities. The Festival will also focus on human rights and sovereignty issues raised by the Idle No More movement.

The Festival will revolve around strong programming with over 10 film screenings, including a delicious pre-festival “Dinner And A Movie” night at Mitla Café, an outdoor opening and film screening on Victoria Island, film programs at the National Gallery of Canada and Club SAW, and a “Gallery Crawl” with curated art exhibitions at Gallery 101 and Fall Down Gallery.

 

Highlights of the Festival include:

• A screening of the documentary “The People of the Kattawapiskak River” that exposes the housing crisis faced by 1,700 Cree in Northern Ontario. Director Alanis Obomsawin will be in attendance and participate in a Q & A session led by Journalist Waubgeshig Rice.

• An opening night outdoor screening on Victoria Island, showing the critically acclaimed film “The Lesser Blessed” by Director Anita Doron and award winning Writer/Producer Richard Van Camp.

• A “Gallery Crawl” event including the opening of two person art exhibition “In-Digital” at Gallery 101 with the artists Jason Baerg and Christian Chapman in attendance, followed by a “Misko (Red) Party” at Fall Down Gallery with artwork by local and emerging artists, and an evening of multi-disciplinary performance with spoken word, live painting, experimental video-art, and live music.

• A “Dinner & A Movie” Night at Mitla Café (July 18 & 19), serving authentic Oaxacan Cuisine prepared by Chef Ana, and screening Director Roberto Olivares Ruiz’s film “Silvestre Pantaleón”.

• A weeklong video production program called “Video Works”, facilitated by Indigenous Culture & Media Innovations (ICMI), and held at the SAW Video Media Art Centre. Work produced during the program will be screened on the final night of the Festival.

• A “Late Night” film program at Club SAW titled “Fabulous Fantasies”, screening 8 short films that are quirky, humorous, dystopian, futuristic, queer, and fabulous.

 

“This event promises to be an excellent venue for advancing works from emerging and established Indigenous artists, both nationally and internationally,” stated Asinabka Co-Directors Howard Adler and Chris Wong. “Such a festival also has the potential to help Canadians better understand the realities of Indigenous peoples lives and experiences.”

This year’s Asinabka Film & Media Art Festival will feature more free programming then ever before. A large proportion of the Festival’s programming will be offered free of charge, including three film programs in partnership with the National Gallery of Canada and its “Sakahàn: International Indigenous Art exhibition”. As a result, the Festival will highlight Indigenous films not only from Canada, but also from Brazil, Russia, Australia, and the United States.

 

For more information about the Festival, please go to: http://asinabkafestival.org

For more information about the Festival, please contact Howard Adler at asinabkafestival at gmail.com or 613.889.9559

 

The Asinabka Film & Media Art Festival would like to acknowledge funding support from the Ontario Arts Council, an agency of the Government of Ontario, as well as funding support from the City of Ottawa. We also thank our Festival Partners, the National Gallery of Canada, Saw Video, Gallery 101, Saw Gallery, ICMI, Wapikoni Mobile, Fall Down Gallery and Aboriginal Experiences.
 

Tues 4pm Nov 27 – Ottawa Solidarity Rally with Unis’tot’en and Grassroot Wet’suwet’en

 

Ottawa Solidarity Rally with Unis’tot’en and Grassroot Wet’suwet’en

Tuesday November 27th, 2012 @ 4pm, 

Prime Minister’s Office (corner of Wellington & Elgin)

FB event: https://www.facebook.com/events/497971450224037/

#nopipelines

This Tuesday, November 27th, communities from coast to coast are taking action in solidarity with the Unis’tot’en and grassroots Wet’suwet’en, to reaffirm and amplify the message that no proposed pipelines will proceed on their territories!
No to PTP! No to all pipelines on Unis’tot’en land!

On November 20th, Wet’suwet’en Hereditary Chief Toghestiy intercepted and issued an eagle feather to surveyors from the Can-Am Geomatics company who were working for Apache’s proposed natural gas Pacific Trails Pipeline (PTP). In Wet’suwet’en law, an eagle feather is used as a first and only notice of trespass. The surveyors were ordered to leave the territory and the road leading into the territory has been closed to all industry activities. The Unist’ot’en are against all pipelines slated to cross through their territories, which include Enbridge Northern Gateway, Kinder Morgans northern proposal, Pembina, Spectra, and Pacific Trails Pipelines.

The Unis’tot’en are now calling for solidarity and support actions to get the message out loud and clear to corporations, investors, and government that they have no right or jurisdiction to approve development on Unist’ot’en lands.

So this Tuesday, November 27th, on unceded Algonquin territory, join in solidarity and resistance with Unist’ot’en in front of the PMO (Wellington and Elgin). Let’s tell them that we support Unist’ot’en and grassroots Wet’suwet’en and say no to all pipelines slated for their territories!

Bring banners, signs, noisemakers to make our voices loud and clear and reaffirm our solidarity with Unis’tot’en!

Invite friends and allies and help spread the word!

Let us know asap if you can help support and organize:
email stan.kupferschmidt at gmail.com or lena at lena.ca

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For more information please see links below:

The Unist’ot’en website, including news releases, backgrounder, and videos from latest events: http://unistotencamp.wordpress.com/

BC First Nation members evict pipeline surveyors:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/british-columbia/bc-first-nation-members-evict-pipeline-surveyors-set-up-road-block/article5547325/

Raising Resistance – Global Action Solidarity with Unis’tot’en: https://www.facebook.com/events/279802322123507/

Pamphlet to print and handout: http://unistotencamp.files.wordpress.com/2012/11/ptp-flyer2.pdf

VIDEOS: Our Land, Our Identity – Algonquins of Barriere Lake Fight For Survival

Michel Thusky and Jacob Wawatie speaking at the event Oct 10, 2012 at the Odawa Native Friendship Centre, Ottawa on unceded Algonquin territory.

Michel Thusky:

Jacob Wawatie:

Event hosted by: Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE), Public Service Alliance of Canada (PSAC), Indigenous Peoples Solidarity Movement of Ottawa (IPSMO), MiningWatch Canada and the Friends Service Committee of Ottawa.

Support the Algonquins of Barriere Lake – Demand Canada Remove Their Indian Act Band Council & Recognize Barriere Lake’s Customary Government

In April 2010, the Minister of Indian Affairs imposed a foreign system of governance (Indian Act electoral system) on the Algonquin First Nation of Barriere Lake to avoid honouring the signed agreements and recognizing legitimate leadership.

At 10 am, on Tuesday, Jan. 24 as the Crown and First Nations leaderships gathered at the old Ottawa City Hall, come out to join Barriere Lake Algonquins at a rally in front of the meeting place to show your solidarity and demand CANADIAN government:

photo credit: Mike Barber

REVOKE SECTION 74 OF INDIAN ACT!
RECOGNIZE BARRIERE LAKE’s CUSTOMARY CHIEF AND COUNCIL!
RESPECT BARRIERE LAKE’S SOVEREIGNTY AND SELF-DETERMINATION!

10 am
Old City Hall, 111 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, unceded Algonquin Territory.

Map & Directions:http://www.csps-efpc.gc.ca/cus/och-eng.asp

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/239530732789598/

Bring creative signs and banners!

Harper has nothing to teach us about democracy!

photo credit: Mike Barber

For more detailed information:

https://ipsmo.wordpress.com/barriere-lake-posts/

http://www.barrierelakesolidarity.org/.

For a good background video on Section 74 and the Barriere Lake struggle, see this short 4-minute film:

IPSMO HAS A NEW PAMPHLET and A BOOKLET to download & print

IPSMO HAS A NEW PAMPHLET!

It describes who we are and what we do, and especially what we stand for. Don’t miss it!

Contents: Who is IPSMO?  – Our History – Algonquins of Barriere Lake – Indigenous Women – Solidarity – Highlights 2008-2010 – How to get involved

Please feel free to download it and share it with your friends and relatives: http://bit.ly/ipsmo-pamphlet2011

 

 

AND, A BOOKLET NOW ONLINE

Our long time solidarity activist Greg Macdougall has generously shared a booklet: “MY ENTRY INTO ABORIGINAL UNDERSTANDING”, featuring a collection of articles on Indigenous self-determination and sovereignty, rights, resistance, language and culture that he has written.

You can download two different PDF versions of the booklet at:

See the announcement here:

Barriere Lake Algonquins and supporters rally for sovereignty

On December 13, 2010, over a hundred community members from Barriere Lake, along with supporters from Montreal and Toronto, drove through the snow to get to Parliament Hill to demand the government take back section 74 and restore their customary rights.

MEDIA REPORTS:

STATEMENTS:

PICTURES:

TAKE ACTION:
Please CALL or WRITE to John Duncan, Minister of Indian Affairs, demand:
* Canada and Quebec must honor the Trilateral Agreement they’ve signed with Barriere Lake in 1991
* Canada must respect Barriere Lake’s traditional government – REVERSE the forcible assimilation by rolling back Section 74 of the Indian Act

“You Are On Indian Land” Akwesasne’s Land Struggles Past and Present

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Movie Screening and Speakers
An educational and fund-raising event

Speakers will include:
John Boots – Akwesasne People’s Fire
Nona Benedict – Akwesasne People’s Fire

NFB Movie, “You Are On Indian Land
The movie will have subtitles.
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Wednesday, May 19 at 7pm
Exile Infoshop, 256 Bank St.
2nd floor
Contact us if you have mobility issues and want to attend
http://www.ipsmo.org
ipsmo@riseup.net
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Both John Boots and Nona Benedict are part of the Akwesasne People’s Fire, a group that formed in response to the attempt by CBSA to arm border guards on the territory of the Akwesasne Mohawks.

They were although both involved in the 1969 Blockade that is covered in the movie “You Are On Indian Land,” and thy will also be talking about this protest and of the long history of the Akwesasne Mohawks struggle for sovereignty with Canada and the United States.

We will be showing the National Film Board movie, “You Are On Indian Land” which is “A film report of the 1969 protest demonstration by Mohawk Indians of the St. Regis Reserve on the international bridge between Canada and the United States near Cornwall, Ontario. By blocking the bridge, which is on the Reserve, and causing a considerable tie-up of motor traffic, the Indians drew public attention to their grievance that they were prohibited by Canadian authorities from duty-free passage of personal purchases across the border; a right they claim was established by the Jay Treaty of 1794. The film shows the confrontation with police, and ensuing action.”

on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=114414028575345