Thurs June 19 – Indigenous Resistance & Solidarity: Against Pipelines, For The Land – at the Mayfair Theatre

UPDATE:
here is the followup post from the event, with all the information and links of projects and upcoming events:
https://ipsmo.wordpress.com/2014/06/20/june19-followup/

 

In the lead-up to National Aboriginal Day (June 21), we’re happy to invite you to our exciting upcoming film night:

Indigenous Resistance and Solidarity
Against Pipelines, For The Land

Thursday June 19th, 6:30pm
at the Mayfair Theatre, 1074 Bank St
Ottawa (unceded Algonquin territory)

Additionally, from 8:45-10pm there will be an informal post-event social
Hosted by Southminster United Church (15 Aylmer Ave at Bank, one block from the theatre)

This event will feature four short films:

  • the new half-hour documentary being released this month about the Unist’ot’en resistance camp out in BC, that is blocking the construction of a number of pipelines and reasserting their Indigenous sovereignty.
  • a shorter film from 2013 that highlights cross-Canada Indigenous resistance to tar sands pipelines
  • video reporting of the police repression of anti-fracking protests in Elsipogtog last fall
  • an interview about anti-oppression, decolonization and responsible allyship from the 2012 PowerShift Canada climate justice conference(scroll down for full film titles / descriptions / preview links)

There will be an opening from Albert Dumont, “South Wind” (Algonquin, Kitigan Zibi)

We will also have speakers to profile local efforts and opportunities to get more involved.


We hope you’re excited too!

Here’s how you can to help support this event:

  • Mark your calendar and ask someone if they’d like to come with you!
  • If you’re on Facebook, invite 10 (or so) friends to the event
  • If you’ve got somewhere to put it, print out a poster (or 10)
  • Please share this link with your contacts

 

This event is hosted by us, IPSMO: Indigenous Peoples Solidarity Movement Ottawa, in partnership with Ecology Ottawa, the Peoples Social Forum, Council of Canadians, and CPAWS – Ottawa Valley (Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society).

There is a suggested donation of $5 – $15 at the door, as it is a fundraiser (but no one will be turned away for lack of funds). Monies raised will go to the Unist’ot’en camp as well as to the various filmmakers’ projects, and to Indigenous and solidarity participation in the Peoples Social Forum this August in Ottawa.

Hope to see you there!

 

Accessibility Notes:

  • The Mayfair Theatre has side entrances that are wheelchair accessible.
    The washrooms are not, but Shoppers Drug Mart (located next door) does have accessible washrooms.
  • Please refrain from wearing perfumes, colognes or other scented products
  • Please contact us if you require bus tickets

Contact: ipsmo@riseup.nethttp://www.ipsmo.org
—-
Films / descriptions / preview links:

RESIST: The Unist’ot’en’s Call to the Land (2014, 30min)
… is a documentary film that visits the fourth annual Environmental Action Camp, hosted on unceded Wet’suwet’en territory by the Unist’ot’en(C’ihlts’ehkhyu/Big Frog) clan. By re-instituting a Free, Prior, and Informed Consent Protocol on the bridge over Wedzin Kwah into their traditional territories, the Unist’ot’en are reasserting their indigenous sovereignty and standing up to industry and government who want to destroy their lands The focus of the film includes the exploration of the environmental, legal, and social issues surrounding hydraulic fracturing, tar sands, and the proposed Kinder-Morgan, Pacific Trails Pipeline, and Enbridge Northern Gateway Pipeline projects in British Columbia. The film’s themes also include indigenous sovereignty and decolonization, as well as documenting one of the most important resistance camps in North America and the movement it is a part of.
http://vimeo.com/74788986

Kahsatstenhsera: Indigenous Resistance to Tar Sands Pipelines (2013, 10min)
Kahsatstenhsera gah-sad-sdanh-se-ra is a Kanienkeha:ka (Mohawk) word that means Strength in Unity. This short documentary details contemporary Indigenous resistance to tar sands pipeline expansion, in particular the Line 9 and Energy East pipelines, which threaten the health of our territories in the northeast of Turtle Island. It includes the voices and perspectives of Dene, Wolastiqiyik, Mi’kmaq, Anishinaabe, Haudenosaunee and Wet’suwet’en land defenders.
http://reclaimturtleisland.com/videos/

Showdown at Highway 134 (2013, 5min)
With some of the only video from behind police lines, subMedia.tv witnessed the brutal raid by the Royal Colonial Mounted Police on the Mi’kmaq blockade of fracking equipment. But the fierce response of the community in defense of the warriors was also captured on camera. We bring you the real story about what really went down on Highway 134, the story that the corporate media doesn’t want you to see.
http://www.submedia.tv/showdown-at-highway-134/

Harsha Walia on Anti-Oppression, Decolonization and Responsible Allyship (2012, 10min)
“Given the devastating cultural, spiritual, economic, linguistic and political impacts of colonialism on Indigenous people in Canada, any serious attempt by non-natives at allying with Indigenous struggles must entail solidarity in the fight against colonization.” Recorded at the PowerShift Canada 2012 conference in Ottawa, unceded Algonquin territory.
https://ipsmo.wordpress.com/2012/11/01/harsha-walia-video-interview/

—-

Posters:
(please consider printing/displaying one or more posters
– be sure to check the box ‘fit/shrink to paper size’ when printing)

Facebook event page:
(if you’re on Facebook, please RSVP and invite your Ottawa friends)

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HONOURING INDIGENOUS WOMEN VOLUME 2 CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

For Vol. 1, please see Honouring Indigenous Women: Hearts of Nations – Vol. 1 

As part of IPSMO’s Honouring Indigenous Women campaign, we aim to make space to actively listen to Indigenous women’s voices as well as to critically reflect our relations to colonialism. For these reasons, we are inviting you to tell us your stories through photography, graphics, art work, cartoon, poetry, and short writing.

We are inviting Native women from all nations – First Nations, Métis and Inuit – to tell us your stories about:

  • Your life experience as Native woman;
  • Your resistance to negative definitions of being;
  • Your actions to reclaim your traditions;
  • How you construct a positive identity by translating tradition into the contemporary context;
  • How you act on that identity in a way that nourishes the overall well-being of your communities; or
  • What being a Native woman means to you.

Those topics above are borrowed from and inspired by Kim Anderson’s book Recognition of Being, Reconstructing Native Womanhood (Anderson 2000: p.15).

We are also inviting non-Indigenous women, as well as both Indigenous and non-Indigenous men and Two-Spirit peoples to tell us about your relations to colonialism and your responsibilities to (re)build relationship with Indigenous women.

Submission Guideline:

  • Please limit your submission to one page (feel free to send us more than one submission however.)
  • Please include a short autobiography. If you are Indigenous, please also include your nation and community. Your name can be a name in your chosen language or a pen name, it’s up to you!
  • For non-written submission, please send us your work in the highest resolution possible.

Deadline for submission:

June 30, 2012

Our Principles:

It is our understanding that Indigenous women, as givers of life and carriers of their cultures, were highly respected in their communities. The prevalent and various forms of violence experienced by Indigenous women are the outcomes of colonization. Its ultimate objective is to facilitate the existing capitalist, patriarchal and racist system within which we live in today. The destruction of Indigenous communities and by extension, their lands, is only possible through deprivation of the power and violation of the physical, emotional, mental and spiritual well-being of Indigenous women.

Furthermore, it has been said by many Indigenous activists and scholars that reclaiming the roles and responsibilities of women (as well as men) in their community is integral to reclaiming self-determination of their people and nationhood.

As non-Indigenous peoples who have participated or been complicit in the past and present colonization of Native peoples and their lands, it is paramount for us to support the work of Indigenous peoples in this regard. The survival of our species is interconnected with the healthy existence of Indigenous women because of their special relationship with the Earth.

The 2nd volume of Honouring Indigenous Women’s booklet is the continuation of our solidarity efforts not only to broaden our (i.e. all peoples) understanding of the struggle of Indigenous women and their importance to our existence, but also to explore our responsibilities as non-Indigenous women in our own decolonization and self-determination process and take actions accordingly.

Our goals are consistent with those of the Vol. 1 – we strive to break the silence on the systemic violence experienced by Indigenous women and the racial stereotypes that have been perpetrated and perpetuated by colonialism. We aim at (re)building relationships with Indigenous women.

Contact Us:

To send us your submission or ask us any questions, please e-mail: ipsmo@riseup.net. Please indicate: Honouring Indigenous Women in the subject line.

Thank YOU!!

Occupy Talks: Indigenous Perspectives on the Occupy Movement

Repost:

Occupy Talks took place in Toronto, at Beit Zatoun, on January, 23rd, 2012.  It was sponsored by the Canadian Auto Workers, Canadian Labour Congress, CAW-Sam Gindin Chair in Social Justice and Democracy Ryerson University, Environmental Justice Toronto.

Description of the event:

What does it mean to ‘Occupy already occupied lands?’. How does Occupy relate to 500 years of resistance on Turtle Island? Please join speakers Tom B.K. Goldtooth, Clayton Thomas-Muller and Leanne Simpson with MC Tannis Nielson to explore and discuss these dynamics of the Occupy movement.

Below are videos of speakers at the event.

Leanne Betasamosake Simpson: 

“And so I say to you today, that if you wish to align yourselves with the disposed and the marginalized, reject the language and ideology of colonialism, conquest and exploitation. As my colleague Waziyatawin told Occupy Oakland “distinguish yourselves from the builders and players of Wall Street”. Place decolonization at the centre of your movement and abandon the language of occupation. And if you want to be really brave and radical, place the concerns and the issues of Indigenous women at the centre of your de-occupation.” – Leanne Betasamosake Simpson

Leanne Betasamosake Simpson is a writer, activist, and scholar of Michi Saagiik Nishnaabeg ancestry and is a band member of Alderville First Nation. She holds a Ph.D. from the University of Manitoba, is an Adjunct Professor in Indigenous Studies at Trent University and an instructor at the Centre for World Indigenous Knowledge, Athabasca University. She has also lectured at Ryerson University, the University of Victoria, the University of Manitoba, and the University of Winnipeg. Leanne has worked with Indigenous communities and organizations across Canada and internationally over the past 15 years on environmental, governance and political issues. She has published three edited volumes including Lighting the Eighth Fire: The Liberation, Resurgence and Protection of Indigenous Nations (2008, Arbeiter Ring), and This is An Honour Song: Twenty Years Since the Barricades (with Kiera Ladner, 2010, Arbeiter Ring). Leanne has published over thirty scholarly articles and raised over one million dollars for community-based research projects over her career. She has written fiction and non-fiction pieces for Now Magazine, Spirit Magazine, the Globe and Mail, Anishinabek News, the Link, and Canadian Art Magazine.

Leanne Betasamosake Simpson’s web site – http://leannesimpson.ca/

Clayton Thomas-Muller:

Clayton Thomas-Muller, of the Mathias Colomb Cree Nation also known as Pukatawagan in Northern Manitoba, Canada, is an activist for Indigenous rights and environmental justice. With his roots in the inner city of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, Clayton began his work as a community organizer, working with Aboriginal youth. Over the years Clayton’s work has taken him to five continents across our Mother Earth. Based out of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, Clayton is involved in many initiatives to support the building of an inclusive movement for energy and climate justice. He serves on the board of the Global Justice Ecology Project and Canadian based Raven Trust. Recognized by Utne Magazine as one of the top 30 under 30 activists in the United States and as a “Climate Hero 2009” by Yes Magazine, Clayton is the Tar Sands Campaign Director for the Indigenous Environmental Network. He works across Canada, Alaska and the lower 48 states with grassroots indigenous communities to defend against the sprawling infrastructure that includes pipelines, refineries and extraction associated with the tar sands, the largest and most destructive industrial project in the history of mankind.

Tom B.K. Goldtooth:

Tom B.K. Goldtooth is the Executive Director of the Indigenous Environmental Network (IEN), headquartered at Bemidji, Minnesota. A social change activist within the Native American community for over 30 years, he has become an environmental and economic justice leader, locally, regionally, nationally and internationally. Tom co-produced an award winning documentary film, Drumbeat For Mother Earth, which addresses the affects of bio-accumulative chemicals on indigenous peoples, and is active with many environmental and social justice organizations besides IEN. Tom is a policy advisor on environmental protection, climate mitigation, and adaptation. Tom co-authored the REDD Booklet on the risks of REDD within indigenous territories and a member of the International Indigenous Peoples Forum on Climate Change — the indigenous caucus within the UNFCCC.

IPSMO HAS A NEW PAMPHLET and A BOOKLET to download & print

IPSMO HAS A NEW PAMPHLET!

It describes who we are and what we do, and especially what we stand for. Don’t miss it!

Contents: Who is IPSMO?  – Our History – Algonquins of Barriere Lake – Indigenous Women – Solidarity – Highlights 2008-2010 – How to get involved

Please feel free to download it and share it with your friends and relatives: http://bit.ly/ipsmo-pamphlet2011

 

 

AND, A BOOKLET NOW ONLINE

Our long time solidarity activist Greg Macdougall has generously shared a booklet: “MY ENTRY INTO ABORIGINAL UNDERSTANDING”, featuring a collection of articles on Indigenous self-determination and sovereignty, rights, resistance, language and culture that he has written.

You can download two different PDF versions of the booklet at:

See the announcement here:

Wed Oct 28: Frontiers of Resistance

Wed Oct 28

Schedule change:

  • 5:00pm – Ellen Gabriel will speak
  • followed by the film, Kahnesatake: 270 Years of Resistance
  • approx 7:30speakers on Beaver Lake Cree Nation and the Tar Sands: Garry Benson and Jack Woodward

at St. Joseph’s Church, 151 Laurier Ave E. (at Cumberland) [Hall entrance at 174 Wilbrod St]

Presenters:

  • Ellen Gabriel of Kahnesatake Nation has traveled across Canada, the Hague in Holland as well as to Strasbourg, France in 1990 to address the European Parliament on the human rights violations that occurred during the “Oka Crisis”.  She also traveled to Japan to educate people about the events in her community during 1990 and to sensitize the public on the history, culture and identity of Aboriginal people. Ellen believes that education is one of the key factors for Aboriginal people to overcome oppression and the effects of colonization while still maintaining our languages, cultures and traditions. In October of 2004, Ellen was elected president of Quebec Native Women Inc.  It is a position she is honored to uphold given the legacy of strong, intelligent Aboriginal women whose tenacity brought about changes to the Indian Act in the form of Bill C-31.
  • Garry Benson of Kelowna is a member of Beaver Lake Cree Nation and a senior partner with Benson Salloum Watts LLP, where he represents financial institutions, Aboriginal organizations and development projects. He has participated in negotiations involving Aboriginal people at the local, provincial and national level. He served as principal negotiator for the Metis Nation British Columbia and lead counsel for the Beaver Lake Cree Nation.
  • Jack Woodward is one of Canada’s pre-eminent practitioners of Aboriginal Law.  Jack has been practicing law since 1979, and literally wrote the book on Aboriginal law: Native Law, Canada’s leading text on the subject. Jack has a significant track record: he stopped clear cut logging on Meares Island in the mid-1980s, and won the first Aboriginal title claim in British Columbia since the Delgamuukw ruling.  Now, following on the heels of the Tsilhqot’in Nation v. British Columbia victory, Jack has embarked on another monumental challenge. This time he is determined to help stop the ecologically disastrous expansion of the tar sands.