Sat Feb 21 & Wed Feb 25: Save Odawa’s 510 Drop-In Centre

1622387_1761223400769974_3511792773388271591_oOpen House / Prepare materials for Wed’s Rally/March
Saturday 11am-1pm at 510 Rideau

RALLY/MARCH to Save Odawa’s 510 Rideau Drop-In Centre
Wednesday 10am at Parliament Hill, march to Ottawa City Hall

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Print promo materials:


Background info/links follow, beneath event details

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The 510 Rideau Drop-In Centre will be holding an “Open House”
THIS Saturday, February 21st, at 11:00 a.m.

The purpose of this Open House is to meet the clients and staff of Centre 510 and to work alongside them in constructing pickets and signs, and to also meet with other people who are willing to assist and help with the rally, and we would also be able to get to know each other better!

If you are able to provide materials (such as signs, pickets, chairs for the elderly, and ANYTHING else that you can think of), please do, and it would be SO MUCH appreciated.

We really need your help! Spread the word!!Thank you!

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RALLY / MARCH to Save Odawa’s 510 Rideau Drop-In Centre

Join us on Wednesday, February 25th at 10 a.m to begin with a peaceful march to have the voices of the homeless heard in telling the Government of Canada and the City of Ottawa to restore funding to the Odawa Native Friendship Centre’s Shawenjeagamik – Centre 510 Drop-In Centre for First Nations, Inuit and Métis Peoples!
(Shawnejeagamik means ‘House of Compassion’ in the Algonquin language).

Join us in solidarity for the betterment of all
There will be some great advocates and speakers, including Ottawa-Centre NDP MP Paul Dewar, for example, and lots of others voicing their support alongside the most vulnerable in our society – this being the homeless – who will tell their stories on how the elimination of funding for their Centre 510 Rideau and the Bannock Bus will directly affect them and the community of Ottawa located on un-surrendered, non-ceded Algonquin Territory!

The march itself will begin at the Peace Flame on Parliament Hill, and continue on a route that will take us down Wellington Street and turning onto Elgin Street, continuing to Laurier Avenue to City Hall of Ottawa.

Once Gathered at City Hall, we will hear a Prayer and Honor Song in accordance with the Traditional Indigenous Protocol of the First Peoples to begin the rally.

There will also be a beautiful and memorable “Unity For The Community – Round Dance Ceremony” for those able to participate.

Please bring your signs and pickets so we can have the voices of the Indigenous Peoples who are “Homeless on the Homelands” heard!

PleaseTweet: #unity4thecommunity #homelessonthehomelands

Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/897472826960987

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LINKS / BACKGROUND:

Facebook group: Save Odawa 510 Rideau Drop-In Centre !!

Petition: Re-establish funding to the Homeless Drop-in Centre at 510 Rideau

Fundraising: SAVE THE ODAWA NATIVE FRIENDSHIP CENTRE DROP-IN

CBC Feb 4 (Video, audio, article):
Aboriginal homeless drop-in centre loses bid for city funding

Ottawa Citizen Feb 4 (article):
Odawa native group says funding cuts will force closing of homeless centre

Ottawa Sun Feb 4 (article):
Centre closure concerns Aboriginals

Metro News Feb 4 (article):
City funding cuts force Aboriginal homeless drop-in centre to close

APTN Feb 5 (video):
Ottawa’s Odawa drop-in centre closing

House of Commons Feb 5 (video):
Will the minister intervene to reinstate the funding to the Odawa centre?

Ottawa Citizen Feb 19 (article):
Councilor McKenney pledges help for homeless agencies

Centretown News Feb 23 (article):
Drop-in centre’s closure harms at-risk Aboriginals

Gabrielle Fayant Feb 23:
Open letter to Mayor Jim Watson, re: 510 Rideau

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VIDEOS: Our Land, Our Identity – Algonquins of Barriere Lake Fight For Survival

Michel Thusky and Jacob Wawatie speaking at the event Oct 10, 2012 at the Odawa Native Friendship Centre, Ottawa on unceded Algonquin territory.

Michel Thusky:

Jacob Wawatie:

Event hosted by: Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE), Public Service Alliance of Canada (PSAC), Indigenous Peoples Solidarity Movement of Ottawa (IPSMO), MiningWatch Canada and the Friends Service Committee of Ottawa.

First Voices! First Women Speak! A Teach-in and Community Gathering

You are invited to attend First Voices! First Women Speak! A teach-in and community gathering featuring renowned Indigenous scholars, writers and artists Lee Maracle and Leanne Betasamosake Simpson, as well as Claudette Commanda, Viola Thomas, Vera Wabegijig, Moe Clark, and others!

Please click the image to download the poster.

1:30 ~ 9 pm
Friday August 24, 2012
Odawa Native Friendship Centre
12 Sterling Ave.
Ottawa, Unceded Algonquin Territory 

Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/409497419085733/

We will meet, share knowledge and generate ideas about how we – as Indigenous and non-Indigenous people – can work together in solidarity to the benefit of all living beings.

There will be a lecture, a book launch, discussion circles, spoken word performances, traditional drumming and a feast!

Please register by August 17th – space is limited! Click here (http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/firstwomenspeakto confirm your spot. The registration fee is $20 or pay what you can. You can pay in advance or at the door. 

EVERYONE IS WELCOME!

This is an amazing opportunity to have so many inspiring women in the same place, sharing their wisdom and experience! We especially want to encourage youth to participate. If you are a youth and/or non-waged, registration is free.

If you are unable to attend but would like to support this event, please make a donation by clicking here. Once the cost of the event has been covered, any additional funds will be put towards the publication of ‘Honouring Indigenous Women: Hearts of Nations- Vol. 2’, an initiative of IPSMO. For details on this publication, please see: www.ipsmo.org.

Programme

MC: Viola Thomas

Part I

1:30 Opening and welcome by Claudette Commanda with drumming by Greg Meekis and Brad Picody
2:00 Lecture by Lee Maracle: There is a direct connection between violence against the earth and violence against women: looking to the past to restore our future.
3:00 Break
3:15 Circle responses, reflections and crafting plans of action (circles lead by Claudette Commanda, Lee Maracle, and Leanne Simpson)
5:00 Spoken word and poetry performance by Vera Wabegijig
5:30 Closing for the afternoon with drumming by Greg Meekis and Brad Picody

5:45 Feast!

Part II 

7:00 Ottawa Launch of Leanne Betasamosake Simpson’s recent book: Dancing on Our Turtle’s Back: Stories of Nishnaabeg Re-Creation, Resurgence and a New Emergence with an opening by Greg Meekis and Brad Picody
8:00 Performance by Moe Clark and Leanne Simpson
8:40 Closing remarks from Lee Maracle
9:00 Closing for the day by Claudette Commanda 

*If you are unable to come for the whole day you are welcome to come only for the launch of Leanne Betasamosake Simpson’s new book ‘Dancing on our Turtle’s Back’ which will be happening from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

This event is a collaboration between Indigenous Peoples Solidarity Movement Ottawa (IPSMO) and KAIROS Canada.

About our guests and presenters:

Claudette Commanda is the Executive Director of the First Nations Confederacy of Cultural Education Centres, where she works tirelessly in the preservation and maintenance of First Nations languages, cultures, and traditions. She is also a part-time professor for the Common Law Section of the Faculty of Law, the Institute of Women’s Studies, the Aboriginal Studies Program and the Faculty of Education at the University of Ottawa. (from the Faculty of Law at the University of Ottawa)

Lee Maracle is a writer, activist and performer from the Stó:lō nation located in the area now known as British Columbia. She is currently the Aboriginal Writer-in-Residence for First Nations House, and an instructor in the Aboriginal Studies Department at the University of Toronto. Lee is one of the founders of the En’owkin International School of Writing in Penticton, BC, and Cultural Director of the Centre for Indigenous Theatre in Toronto. She mentors young people on personal and cultural healing and reclamation. (from CBC 8th Fire)

Books written by Lee Maracle:

  • Bobbi Lee: Indian Rebel – 1975 (revised 1990)
  • Sojourner’s Truth and Other Stories – 1990
  • Oratory: Coming to Theory – 1990
  • Sundogs – 1991
  • Ravensong – (Press Gang Publishers)1993
  • I am Woman: A Native Perspective on Sociology and Feminism – 1988; Press Gang Publishers 1996
  • Daughters are Forever – 2002
  • Will’s Garden – 2002
  • First Wives Club: Coast Salish Style – (Theytus Books Publishing) 2010

Leanne Betasamosake Simpson is a writer and scholar of Michi Saagiik Nishnaabeg ancestry and is a member of Alderville First Nation. She holds a Ph.D. from the University of Manitoba, is an Adjunct Professor of Indigenous Studies at Trent University and an instructor at the Centre for World Indigenous Knowledge, Athabasca University. Leanne has published three edited volumes including Lighting the Eighth Fire: The Liberation, Resurgence and Protection of Indigenous Nations (2008, Arbeiter Ring), and This is An Honour Song: Twenty Years Since the Barricades (with Kiera Ladner, 2010, Arbeiter Ring). Her recent book, Dancing on Our Turtle’s Back: Stories of Nishnaabeg Re-Creation, Resurgence and a New Emergence was published in May 2011 and turns to Nishnaabeg theory and philosophy for guidance in building and maintaining resurgence movements. It is her hope that this work will inspire the regeneration of Nishnaabeg systems of governance, language, and knowledge – systems that place women back at the centre of Kina Gchi Nishnaabeg‐ogaming. (from Leanne Simpson’s web site: http://leannesimpson.ca/)

Moe Clark. With humble beginnings as a Calgary native, Moe received mentorship from Sheri-D Wilson, who was integral in launching her career as a spoken word artist at the 2005 Calgary International Spoken Word Festival. Following the success of her debut, as well as winning the Calgary CBC Poetry Face-Off (2007), Moe released a debut album “Circle of She: Story & Song” (April ’08) and toured across Canada. Her award winning poem “Intersecting Circles” was made into a video poem in 2009 (Bravo!Fact, CCA, AFA) and became part of the permanent collection at the Peace River Museum, Archives and Mackenzie Centre. (from Moe Clark’s web site: http://www.moeclark.ca/. You can also listen to her on her web site!)

Vera Wabegijig is an Anishnaabe mother from the bear clan of the Mississauga First Nation and Wikwemikong Unceded Reserve. She is also a poet, writer and media artist. Her poetry has been printed in many anthologies including XXX NDN, Surviving in the Hour of Darkness, Breaking the Surface, Our Words, Our Revolutions, Reclaiming the Future, and Sweetgrass Grows All Around Her. Currently, Vera has completed a collection of poetry, Manomin – Wild Rice Dreams, and with her daughters Storm and Grace, will launch a new media website this summer called Ishkode/Fire. You can read her blog at: http://verawaabegeeshig.wordpress.com/.

This event is also supported by Public Service Alliance of Canada (PSAC), Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE), OPIRG-Carleton (the Ontario Public Interest Research Group at Carleton University), Quakers, Project of Heart, Amnesty International Canada and Canadian Centre for Policy Alternative and Arbeiter Ring Publishing!