Aug 14 – Film Screening of Inuit Knowledge and Climate Change

What: Film Screening of Inuit Knowledge and Climate Change

Where: Wednesday, August 14, 7PM

Where: 251 Bank Street, 2nd Floor (Octopus Books in Centretown)

—- Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/162833223900286/

Nunavut-based director Zacharias Kunuk (Atanarjuat The Fast Runner) and researcher and filmmaker Dr. Ian Mauro (Seeds of Change) have teamed up with Inuit communities to document their knowledge and experience regarding climate change. This new documentary, the world’s first Inuktitut language film on the topic, takes the viewer “on the land” with elders and hunters to explore the social and ecological impacts of a warming Arctic.

Join the Indigenous Peoples Solidarity Movement Ottawa (IPSMO), Cinema Politica, and Octopus Books for a screening and discussion of “Inuit Knowledge and Climate Change). A member of IPSMO will facilitate a discussion after the film.

This event is “Pay What You Can (Nobody is turned away)”

More about the movie:
The impact of climate change in Canada is discussed by those at its front lines. In this historic documentary by the legendary Isuma Productions, Inuit people speak first-hand about how their landscape is changing, how the sky has turned colour and if the polar bear really is endangered. Their insight – borne from centuries of shared knowledge – reveals a deep intimacy with their environment and convincingly challenges mainstream media accounts of climate change. Unsettling accounts of new flora, thawing permafrost and dwindling ice point directly to the truth that climate change has become a human rights issue for many Indigenous people.

More about IPSMO:
IPSMO is a grassroots organization that directly supports indigenous peoples in diverse struggles for justice. We also work within communities to challenge the lies and half-truths about indigenous peoples and colonization that dominate Canadian society. The organization is open to both indigenous and non-indigenous people, and focuses on local and regional campaigns.

IPSMO website: http://www.ipsmo.org
Octopus Books website: http://octopusbooks.ca/
Cinema Politica website: http://www.cinemapolitica.org/film/inuit-knowledge-and-climate-change

 

July 2 Book Launch – Aboriginal Rights Are Not Human Rights: In Defence of Indigenous Struggles, with author Peter Kulchyski

Tuesday July 2nd, 7pm
at 251 Bank Street, 2nd Floor (Octopus Books in Centretown)

Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/389732467799306

Join us for the Ottawa launch of Aboriginal Rights Are Not Human Rights: In Defence of Indigenous Struggles, by Peter Kulchyski.

Aboriginal rights do not belong to the broader category of universal human rights because they are grounded in the particular practices of aboriginal people. So argues Peter Kulchyski in a provocative book from the front lines of indigenous people’s struggles to defend their culture from the ongoing conquest of their traditional lands. Kulchyski shows that some differences are more different than others, and he draws a border between bush culture and mall culture, between indigenous people’s mode of production and the totalizing push of state-led capitalism.

Peter Kulchyski is a leading Canadian Native Studies scholar at the University of Manitoba. He has published numerous books on Aboriginal issues, including The Red Indians and Like the Sound of a Drum: Aboriginal Cultural Politics in Denendeh and Nunavut, which won the 2005 Alexander Kennedy Isbister Award for Non-Fiction. Dr. Kulchyski is a founding member of the Friends of Grassy Narrows/Winnipeg Indigenous Solidarity Network and the Defenders of the Land, both Aboriginal rights community activist groups.

For more:
Interview with author Peter Kulchyski (at LPG.ca)

Co-sponsors:
Arbeiter Ring Publishing, Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA), Indigenous Peoples Solidarity Movement (IPSMO) Ottawa, KAIROS Canada, MiningWatch Canada, Niigaan, Public Service Alliance of Canada (PSAC) National Capital Region

Book launch – Fractured Homeland by Bonita Lawrence – Aug 13

Launch of Fractured Homeland: Federal Recognition and Algonquin Identity in Ontario. Featuring author Bonita Lawrence, Bob Majaury (Ottawa Algonquins), Daniel Bernard Amikwabe (Algonquin Union) & other speakers!

UPDATE – Watch the video recording of the event:

Monday August 13, 6:00pm-8:00pm
Minwaashin Lodge, 424 Catherine St (2nd floor)
Ottawa, Unceded Algonquin Territory

Free admission; copies of the book will be available for purchase.

Hosted by Indigenous Peoples Solidarity Movement Ottawa (IPSMO), co-sponsored by Minwaashin Lodge and Octopus Books.

Click here for event on Facebook. Click here to download poster (pdf).

Fractured Homelandis about non-status Algonquins in Ontario — their diverse struggles around identity and nationhood — set against the backdrop of the Algonquin comprehensive land claim

About the author:Bonita Lawrence (Mi’kmaw) teaches Indigenous Studies at York University in Toronto. She is the author of “Real” Indians and Others: Mixed-Blood Urban Native People and Indigenous Nationhood.

More about the book:In 1992, the Algonquins of Pikwakanagan, the only federally recognized Algonquin reserve in Ontario, launched a comprehensive land claim. The claim drew attention to the reality that two-thirds of Algonquins in Canada have never been recognized as Indian, and have therefore had to struggle to reassert jurisdiction over their traditional lands.

Fractured Homeland is Bonita Lawrence’s stirring account of the Algonquins’ twenty-year struggle for identity and nationhood despite the imposition of a provincial boundary that divided them across two provinces, and the Indian Act, which denied federal recognition to two-thirds of Algonquins. Drawing on interviews with Algonquins across the Ottawa River watershed, Lawrence voices the concerns of federally unrecognized Algonquins in Ontario, whose ancestors survived land theft and the denial of their rights as Algonquins, and whose family histories are reflected in the land. The land claim not only forced many of these people to struggle with questions of identity, it also heightened divisions as those who launched the claim failed to develop a more inclusive vision of Algonquinness.

This path-breaking exploration of how a comprehensive claims process can fracture the search for nationhood among First Nations also reveals how federally unrecognized Algonquin managed to hold onto a distinct sense of identity, despite centuries of disruption by settlers and the state.

For a sample Chapter:

http://www.ubcpress.ca/books/pdf/chapters/2012/FracturedHomeland.pdf