Aug. 22 & 23: Ottawa Launch of Honouring Indigenous Women: Hearts of Nations – Vol. 2

Please spread the word widely and invite your friends and colleagues to join you!
Come Celebrate the Launch of this Amazing Collection of Writing and Visual Arts!
 
7:00 pm Thursday, August 22
2nd FLOOR, 251 BANK ST. OTTAWA
Double book launch with Louise Vien’s new children’s book “Welcome to the Roubabbou Collection”!
Hosted by the Sound of My Heart Collective 
Sponsored by Indigenous Peoples Solidarity Movement Ottawa & 25OneCommunity
 
6:00 pm Friday, August 23
1155 LOLA ST @ COVENTRY RD. OTTAWA
Hosted by Minwaashin Lodge Culture Program
Wheelchair Accessible
OC TRANSPO BUS #18 
Parking Available in the front & back

Everyone is Welcome!

 
Local Artists: Angela Ashawasegai, Roberta Donna Della-Picca, Louise Vien and Zainab Amadahy will be attending to talk about their work that is part of this amazing collection. Louise Vien will be present only on August 22. She will also launch her recent published book “Welcome to the Roubabbou Collection“, a children’s book, with us. 
 
Join us for some drumming & refreshments while showing community support. There will be a draw at both events!
 
Books will be available for purchase.
 
** This is part of our multi-city launch in late summer and early fall 2013 in cities including Vancouver, Edmonton, Regina, Toronto, Peterborough, Ottawa and Manistee (Michigan, US).
 
Honouring Indigenous Women: Hearts of Nations – Vol. 2 is a collection of creative writings and visual arts by Indigenous women alongside their allies from many nations across Turtle Island (North America). It is made possible by 62 writers and artists reflecting and sharing their lived experiences with regards to their relationships with the land, birth mothers, families, communities, and themselves. This anthology is available online and can be found at http://thesoundofmyheart.weebly.com/.
 
“Welcome to the Roubabbou Collection” series by Louise Vien contain 13 tiny books. It is a child’s first Métis French word book, ideal to stimulate his or her thirst for learning. Each page is entirely in colour with familiar cultural Métis objects to help promote our ancestors vocabulary for the next generation.This collection of books is a great educative resource for children between the ages 2  to 11. It introduces the child to an old variety of phonetic French spoken by the Métis of the 18th and 19th century of which is still spoken today. This particular French is also at the origin of the the Mitchif language seen mostly in western Canada (mix language of French and Cree). For more info: http://metistraditions.com/.
 

About the Sound of My Heart Collective:
 
The Sound of My Heart Collective is an initiative of a small group of women from diverse backgrounds based in Ottawa, Ontario on unceded Algonquin Territory. Our mandate is to carry out Honouring Indigenous Women project, which is to publish the productions of Indigenous women and their allies through the arts of storytelling, poetry, painting, drawing, photography, and sound. Its objective is to raise awareness about protecting and honouring Indigenous women and strives to put an end to all forms of violence. It offers a space to deepen our understanding of Indigenous women on Turtle Island (North America), to put Indigenous women’s voices, experiences and realities front and center, and to foster strong solidarity between native and non-native communities. It is a solidarity initiative to support the existing efforts of Indigenous women. Website: http://thesoundofmyheart.weebly.com/.
 
About Minwaashin Lodge – An Aboriginal Women’s Support Centre:
 
Minwaashin Lodge provides a range of programs and services to First Nations, Inuit and Métis women and children (regardless of status) who are survivors of domestic and other forms of violence, and who may also be suffering the effects of the residential school system. All programs and services are provided in the context of cultural beliefs and values to ensure a holistic approach is used as part of the healing journey. Website: http://www.minlodge.com/,
 
About 25OneCommunity:
25One is a collaborative, shared workspace for groups and individuals engaged in progressive social and cultural missions. We offer groups shared office spaces and facilities in a dynamic work environment, for non-profit organizations, social entrepreneurs, freelancers and consultants. Facebook Page: http://facebook.com/25onecommunity
 

** We are still seeking funds to print and carry out our multi-city launch. Please support our work and donate generously, if you can! Here is the link to make donations: http://thesoundofmyheart.weebly.com/donate.html.
 
Thank You, Chi Miigwetch.

Book launch – Fractured Homeland by Bonita Lawrence – Aug 13

Launch of Fractured Homeland: Federal Recognition and Algonquin Identity in Ontario. Featuring author Bonita Lawrence, Bob Majaury (Ottawa Algonquins), Daniel Bernard Amikwabe (Algonquin Union) & other speakers!

UPDATE – Watch the video recording of the event:

Monday August 13, 6:00pm-8:00pm
Minwaashin Lodge, 424 Catherine St (2nd floor)
Ottawa, Unceded Algonquin Territory

Free admission; copies of the book will be available for purchase.

Hosted by Indigenous Peoples Solidarity Movement Ottawa (IPSMO), co-sponsored by Minwaashin Lodge and Octopus Books.

Click here for event on Facebook. Click here to download poster (pdf).

Fractured Homelandis about non-status Algonquins in Ontario — their diverse struggles around identity and nationhood — set against the backdrop of the Algonquin comprehensive land claim

About the author:Bonita Lawrence (Mi’kmaw) teaches Indigenous Studies at York University in Toronto. She is the author of “Real” Indians and Others: Mixed-Blood Urban Native People and Indigenous Nationhood.

More about the book:In 1992, the Algonquins of Pikwakanagan, the only federally recognized Algonquin reserve in Ontario, launched a comprehensive land claim. The claim drew attention to the reality that two-thirds of Algonquins in Canada have never been recognized as Indian, and have therefore had to struggle to reassert jurisdiction over their traditional lands.

Fractured Homeland is Bonita Lawrence’s stirring account of the Algonquins’ twenty-year struggle for identity and nationhood despite the imposition of a provincial boundary that divided them across two provinces, and the Indian Act, which denied federal recognition to two-thirds of Algonquins. Drawing on interviews with Algonquins across the Ottawa River watershed, Lawrence voices the concerns of federally unrecognized Algonquins in Ontario, whose ancestors survived land theft and the denial of their rights as Algonquins, and whose family histories are reflected in the land. The land claim not only forced many of these people to struggle with questions of identity, it also heightened divisions as those who launched the claim failed to develop a more inclusive vision of Algonquinness.

This path-breaking exploration of how a comprehensive claims process can fracture the search for nationhood among First Nations also reveals how federally unrecognized Algonquin managed to hold onto a distinct sense of identity, despite centuries of disruption by settlers and the state.

For a sample Chapter:

http://www.ubcpress.ca/books/pdf/chapters/2012/FracturedHomeland.pdf

Walk 4 Justice

Please spread the word!

On June 21, 2011, Walk4Justice began their long walk from Vancouver, Coast Salish Territory to Ottawa, Algonquin Territory to raise awareness about the plight of the far too many (over 3000) missing and murdered Indigenous women across Turtle Island (Canada). On Monday, September 19, they will be ending their walk at Parliament Hill where they will continue demanding justice for these women and their families.

Please come out and show your support for the walkers. Bring your banners, signs or placards and good spirit to the rally!

March & Rally
Monday, September 19
9am at Minwaashin Lodge (424 Catherine St), 10am Parliament Hill

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=112167435552467

Please join the walkers at Minwaashin Lodge at 9am and walk with them to Parliament Hill.  If you can’t make it then, please come to the rally on Parliament Hill at 10am.

Feast and Fund-raiser 
Monday, September 19
5:00pm at Mac Hall on 211 Bronson Ave.

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=242669869108872

Community celebration, feast, entertainment, and fundraiser! Featuring Walk4Justice co-founders Gladys Radek & Bernie Williams and Beverley Jacobs from Families of Sisters in Spirit.  Headliners for the performance: Elaine Kicknosway, Nancy Myatt, Vera Wabegijig, Sandy Scofield, Elizabeth Riley Band and Jamie Koebel!Please spread the word!

These 2 events are part of the 30 Days of Justice organized by the Families of Sisters in Spirit and their allies.  “30 Days of Justice” brings together families of missing and murdered Aboriginal women and the wider Ottawa communities to raise critical awareness on the violence against Indigenous women and demand justice and accountability for the disappeared and murdered women. For more details and other events during the 30 Days of Justice: http://30daysofjustice.wordpress.com

About Walk4Justice

The Walk4Justice is a nonprofit organization that was created by donation and volunteer since January 2008. Gladys Radek and Bernie Williams co-founded this group to raise awareness about the plight of the far too many missing and murdered women across Canada. Their supporters consist of family members who have lost their loved ones across the nation and grassroots women and men from all walks of life. Together with their supporters, the Walk4Justice demands justice, closure, equality and accountability.

Gladys’s niece, Tamara Lynn Chipman disappeared off Highway 16 out of Prince Rupert, BC, now dubbed the Highway of Tears in northern British Columbia. She vanished without a trace on September 21, 2005. Bernie is a long time advocate and voice for the women who have been forced to live on the streets of Canada’s poorest postal code, the DTES. She has been a frontline worker in the DTES for 25 years. Her mother and two sisters were also victims of violence who were murdered in the DTES over the years.

For more info: http://fnbc.info/walk4justice

About Families of Sisters in Spirit (FSIS)

FSIS is a volunteer grassroots non-profit organization led by families of missing and murdered Indigenous women in Canada with the support of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal communities. FSIS was the vision of one family member named Bridget Tolley, an Algonquin grandmother and activist from the Kitigan Zibi First Nation whose mother was killed by a Quebec provincial (SQ) police car in 2001 with the ongoing support of Beverley Jacobs, Mohawk grandmother from Grand-River Territory, whose cousin Tashina General, pregnant with her son Tucker, was murdered in 2008, and non-Aboriginal student and activist Kristen Gilchrist. Together we are working to end violence, challenge interconnected inequalities in Canadian society, and transform ourselves and the world around us.

Visit their FB page: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Families-of-Sisters-in-Spirit/169989823049052

About the performers

Elaine Kicknosway and her son Theland: Drummer and Hoop dancer

Nancy Myatt: Nancy is a Mohawk from Kahnesatake with Algonquin. Her family lives in Kitigan Zibi. She is a traditional dancer and drummer. She has two daughters and a granddaughter arriving in November. She has supported Take Back the Night and Sisters in Spirit by sharing songs in her culture. She is very happy to support and be involved in this cause because her great grandmother was also murdered.

Vera Wabegijig: Vera is a poet and Anishnaabe mother from the bear clan who writes for expression and to connect with the larger world. See Vera’s gift to us: http://verawaabegeeshig.wordpress.com/

Sandy Scofield: Sandy is a multi-award winning composer, musician and singer. She has studied classical, jazz, African, Indonesian gamelan and electro-acoustic music. A Métis from the Saulteaux and Cree Nations, she hails from four generations of fiddlers, singers and musicians. Among her four recordings to date, she has won five Canadian Aboriginal Music Awards, a Canadian Folk Music Award, an Indian Summer Music Award (U.S.A.), a Western Canadian Music Award and received three consecutive Juno nominations. Check out her web site: http://sandyscofield.com/

Elizabeth Riley Band: Ottawa-based Elizabeth Riley Band has a raw, contagious sound, with original songs and interpretations inspired by bluegrass, folk classics, and alt and traditional country music. Wielding banjo, acoustic and electric guitars, harmonica, djembe, stand-up snare, these four singer-songwriters speak out about personal, social and political realities. Their songs are infused with women’s lived experience. Vocally driven with an electrified edge, Elizabeth Riley Band has captivated audiences at an eclectic range of venues. For a taste of their music: http://www.elizabethrileyband.com/

Jaime Koebel: Jamie is Metis from Lac La Biche, Alberta. She is an artist, a performer, an educator and a public speaker. As a successful visual artist, she has been fortunate to have works that have been showcased world-wide and held in many prestigious personal and public galleries. Her art reflects fantastical plant life – all with a story! As a performance artist, She was a dancer with the well-known troupe, Jig on the Fly for five years until 2010 when she started a new dance group with her children called Jaime and the Jiglets. She also dances with the musical group, Fiddle Ground. Over the years, She has won many individual dance competitions in Canada and the United States. See her fantastic works: http://www.JaimeKoebel.com/

Tues Oct 27: Fighting For Our Rights

Tues Oct 27, 7:00pm
Fighting for Our Rights: Indigenous Women and Youth in an Urban Context
St. Joseph’s Church, 151 Laurier Ave E. (at Cumberland) [Hall entrance at 174 Wilbrod St]

Indigenous women and youth living in urban areas in particular face many challenges in accessing appropriate services, practicing their culture, in being discriminated against, high rates of violence and social problems. How can we respond many of these problems, from the community level to the political? How can we reverse the trends of violence? How can we stop the cycles of violence and begin healing? How can we empower Indigenous women and youth to confront these challenges directly? What role do allies play? This panel will explore these and more issues.

Panelists:

  • Lisa Abel, Child Welfare and Indigenous Media activist
  • Clayton Thomas Muller, Indigenous Environmental Network
  • Claudette Commanda, First Nations Confederacy of Cultural Education Centres
  • Speaker from Minwaashin Lodge/Aboriginal Women’s Support Centre
  • Moderated by Ben Powless, Defenders of the Land