Niigaan: In Conversation – Red Man Laughing Live Podcast (VIDEO)

niigaan-rml
 

Reflecting upon 1 year of Idle No More – Biiskaabiiyang: Returning to Ourselves, featuring (L-R): Wab Kinew, Celina Cada-Matasawagon, Geraldine King, Leanne Simpson, Serpent River FN Chief Isadore Day, Lee Maracle, Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs Grand Chief Derek Nepinak, and host Ryan McMahon.

Intros by Niigaan organizers Linda Nothing and Jocelyn Formsma, followed by stand-up segment by Ryan McMahon and then the panel discussion.

Hoop dance by Theland Kicknosway (separate video).

December 10, 2013 at the National Arts Centre, Ottawa.

*Note: At the event, there was a special announcement from Ryan McMahon: Red Man Laughing will be coming to CBC Radio this year!
 

Ryan’s notes on the discussion:

Winter Time is the time of year where the earth becomes covered in snow. It’s a time for rest and reflection. Last winter we rose. We did not rest, we did not reflect. We took to the malls, the streets, and the hills. The community rallied around, there was a desperate feeling, people gathered at teach-ins, the scent of medicines was everywhere. We need to get that energy back. Niigaan: In Conversation asked ourselves, what happened to the fire? The problems are still here, we still have work to do. Let’s get together as a community and talk about our future.

A few highlights from this talk that you should listen for are:

  • Lee Maracle talking about the prophecy that told us that we’d be teaching the world about the power of our drums & community.
  • Chief Isadore Day breaking down the importance of self care and taking care of the homefires.
  • Leanne Simpson sharing her thoughts on the Wampum Belt – letting us know what the belt DOES mean to her and what it DOES NOT mean to her.
  • A spirited and heart felt discussion on education for Native Youth (FNEA rejections) – we can/need to take better care of our young people as they head to institutions.

 

Websites: Niigaan.caRedManLaughing.com

Video (2hr20min) by Greg Macdougall, EquitableEducation.ca
Or listen to the podcast at Red Man Laughing
 

 

Theland Kicknosway – Hoop Dance:

 

“An Open Appeal to Everyone I know” from Lee Maracle

“If you provide time, space, safety, and consistency, whoever your participants are, be they young or old, they will move into expressing authentic self. Once you can do that you can express stories about yourselves and about others.” (Columpa Bobb, Artistic Director, Aboriginal Arts Training and Mentorship Program)

Aboriginal Arts Program (photo credit: AAMTP)

An open appeal to everyone I know

There is a program in Winnipeg, Manitoba called the Aboriginal Arts Training and Mentorship Program [AAMTP] that serves the most underprivileged demographic in Winnipeg – Aboriginal children. I have witnessed AAMTP’s work with these children. Under the direction of Columpa Bobb, Artistic Director, they alongside veteran writers developed the play for the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Launch in Winnipeg, Manitoba. [for a clip from the Moving Gallery follow this link: http://www.cbc.ca/manitoba/scene/other/2012/05/31/columpa-c-bob/.]  At AATMP these young children acquire writing skills, performance arts skills, video and film making skills and are transformed from being underprivileged victims into children and youth who are confident and powerful good citizens. Unlike many programs for children, this one is free. The children of the North End in Winnipeg cannot afford tuition or even bus fares. Cultural Connection for Aboriginal Youth funds about half the cost of the program. These funds connected to Cultural Connection for Aboriginal Youth are in jeopardy. This means Aboriginal Arts Training and Mentorship is at risk of closing its doors, unless we can raise enough bridge funding. Manitoba Theatre for Young People cannot bridge the gap while the funds are up in the air.  [For CBC interview with Columpa Bobb regarding the freeze, follow this link: http://www.cbc.ca/player/radio/local+shows/manitoba/information+radio+MB/ID/2255434978/?sort=mostRecent]

Desperate for their program two of the children tried to help save it: “There was a beautiful little moment when two young girls from a grade 5 and 6 class held a little bake sale and raised $130.00 to try and save their program.” [Columpa Bobb, Artistic Director, AATMP] If our kids can do that, surely we can do something too.

I know some people. Some of you are close friends, some are family, some are colleagues, some I barely know, some have money, most don’t, but all of you have heart and so I am asking each of you to send $25.00 to Aboriginal Arts Training and Mentorship Program and send this appeal to two friends to keep the doors to the program open in the fall. I want my readership, those who have told me “they feel so inspired, empowered by my work”, to contribute as well. Our children need the empowerment and inspiration of Aboriginal Arts Training and Mentoring Program. Please send a note of well-wishing for our children to Columpa C. Bobb, Artistic Director, and send your cheque or money order to:

Aboriginal Arts Training and Mentorship Program
195 Young St.
Winnipeg, MB
R3C 3S8

Lee Maracle speaking at First Voices! First Women Speak! gathering in Ottawa, unceded Algonquin Territory on August 24, 2012

Lee Maracle

Lee Maracle is a writer, activist and performer from the Stó:lō nation located in the area now known as British Columbia. She is currently the Aboriginal Writer-in-Residence for First Nations House, and an instructor in the Aboriginal Studies Department at the University of Toronto. Lee is one of the founders of the En’owkin International School of Writing in Penticton, BC, and Cultural Director of the Centre for Indigenous Theatre in Toronto. She mentors young people on personal and cultural healing and reclamation. (from CBC 8th Fire)

For more info about Lee Maracle and her books: http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/70695.Lee_Maracle

About the Aboriginal Arts Training and Mentorship Program: http://www.mtyp.ca/aboriginal-arts.cfm

Original Appeal Letter by Lee Maracle:

First Voices! First Women Speak! A Teach-in and Community Gathering

You are invited to attend First Voices! First Women Speak! A teach-in and community gathering featuring renowned Indigenous scholars, writers and artists Lee Maracle and Leanne Betasamosake Simpson, as well as Claudette Commanda, Viola Thomas, Vera Wabegijig, Moe Clark, and others!

Please click the image to download the poster.

1:30 ~ 9 pm
Friday August 24, 2012
Odawa Native Friendship Centre
12 Sterling Ave.
Ottawa, Unceded Algonquin Territory 

Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/409497419085733/

We will meet, share knowledge and generate ideas about how we – as Indigenous and non-Indigenous people – can work together in solidarity to the benefit of all living beings.

There will be a lecture, a book launch, discussion circles, spoken word performances, traditional drumming and a feast!

Please register by August 17th – space is limited! Click here (http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/firstwomenspeakto confirm your spot. The registration fee is $20 or pay what you can. You can pay in advance or at the door. 

EVERYONE IS WELCOME!

This is an amazing opportunity to have so many inspiring women in the same place, sharing their wisdom and experience! We especially want to encourage youth to participate. If you are a youth and/or non-waged, registration is free.

If you are unable to attend but would like to support this event, please make a donation by clicking here. Once the cost of the event has been covered, any additional funds will be put towards the publication of ‘Honouring Indigenous Women: Hearts of Nations- Vol. 2’, an initiative of IPSMO. For details on this publication, please see: www.ipsmo.org.

Programme

MC: Viola Thomas

Part I

1:30 Opening and welcome by Claudette Commanda with drumming by Greg Meekis and Brad Picody
2:00 Lecture by Lee Maracle: There is a direct connection between violence against the earth and violence against women: looking to the past to restore our future.
3:00 Break
3:15 Circle responses, reflections and crafting plans of action (circles lead by Claudette Commanda, Lee Maracle, and Leanne Simpson)
5:00 Spoken word and poetry performance by Vera Wabegijig
5:30 Closing for the afternoon with drumming by Greg Meekis and Brad Picody

5:45 Feast!

Part II 

7:00 Ottawa Launch of Leanne Betasamosake Simpson’s recent book: Dancing on Our Turtle’s Back: Stories of Nishnaabeg Re-Creation, Resurgence and a New Emergence with an opening by Greg Meekis and Brad Picody
8:00 Performance by Moe Clark and Leanne Simpson
8:40 Closing remarks from Lee Maracle
9:00 Closing for the day by Claudette Commanda 

*If you are unable to come for the whole day you are welcome to come only for the launch of Leanne Betasamosake Simpson’s new book ‘Dancing on our Turtle’s Back’ which will be happening from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

This event is a collaboration between Indigenous Peoples Solidarity Movement Ottawa (IPSMO) and KAIROS Canada.

About our guests and presenters:

Claudette Commanda is the Executive Director of the First Nations Confederacy of Cultural Education Centres, where she works tirelessly in the preservation and maintenance of First Nations languages, cultures, and traditions. She is also a part-time professor for the Common Law Section of the Faculty of Law, the Institute of Women’s Studies, the Aboriginal Studies Program and the Faculty of Education at the University of Ottawa. (from the Faculty of Law at the University of Ottawa)

Lee Maracle is a writer, activist and performer from the Stó:lō nation located in the area now known as British Columbia. She is currently the Aboriginal Writer-in-Residence for First Nations House, and an instructor in the Aboriginal Studies Department at the University of Toronto. Lee is one of the founders of the En’owkin International School of Writing in Penticton, BC, and Cultural Director of the Centre for Indigenous Theatre in Toronto. She mentors young people on personal and cultural healing and reclamation. (from CBC 8th Fire)

Books written by Lee Maracle:

  • Bobbi Lee: Indian Rebel – 1975 (revised 1990)
  • Sojourner’s Truth and Other Stories – 1990
  • Oratory: Coming to Theory – 1990
  • Sundogs – 1991
  • Ravensong – (Press Gang Publishers)1993
  • I am Woman: A Native Perspective on Sociology and Feminism – 1988; Press Gang Publishers 1996
  • Daughters are Forever – 2002
  • Will’s Garden – 2002
  • First Wives Club: Coast Salish Style – (Theytus Books Publishing) 2010

Leanne Betasamosake Simpson is a writer and scholar of Michi Saagiik Nishnaabeg ancestry and is a member of Alderville First Nation. She holds a Ph.D. from the University of Manitoba, is an Adjunct Professor of Indigenous Studies at Trent University and an instructor at the Centre for World Indigenous Knowledge, Athabasca University. Leanne has published three edited volumes including Lighting the Eighth Fire: The Liberation, Resurgence and Protection of Indigenous Nations (2008, Arbeiter Ring), and This is An Honour Song: Twenty Years Since the Barricades (with Kiera Ladner, 2010, Arbeiter Ring). Her recent book, Dancing on Our Turtle’s Back: Stories of Nishnaabeg Re-Creation, Resurgence and a New Emergence was published in May 2011 and turns to Nishnaabeg theory and philosophy for guidance in building and maintaining resurgence movements. It is her hope that this work will inspire the regeneration of Nishnaabeg systems of governance, language, and knowledge – systems that place women back at the centre of Kina Gchi Nishnaabeg‐ogaming. (from Leanne Simpson’s web site: http://leannesimpson.ca/)

Moe Clark. With humble beginnings as a Calgary native, Moe received mentorship from Sheri-D Wilson, who was integral in launching her career as a spoken word artist at the 2005 Calgary International Spoken Word Festival. Following the success of her debut, as well as winning the Calgary CBC Poetry Face-Off (2007), Moe released a debut album “Circle of She: Story & Song” (April ’08) and toured across Canada. Her award winning poem “Intersecting Circles” was made into a video poem in 2009 (Bravo!Fact, CCA, AFA) and became part of the permanent collection at the Peace River Museum, Archives and Mackenzie Centre. (from Moe Clark’s web site: http://www.moeclark.ca/. You can also listen to her on her web site!)

Vera Wabegijig is an Anishnaabe mother from the bear clan of the Mississauga First Nation and Wikwemikong Unceded Reserve. She is also a poet, writer and media artist. Her poetry has been printed in many anthologies including XXX NDN, Surviving in the Hour of Darkness, Breaking the Surface, Our Words, Our Revolutions, Reclaiming the Future, and Sweetgrass Grows All Around Her. Currently, Vera has completed a collection of poetry, Manomin – Wild Rice Dreams, and with her daughters Storm and Grace, will launch a new media website this summer called Ishkode/Fire. You can read her blog at: http://verawaabegeeshig.wordpress.com/.

This event is also supported by Public Service Alliance of Canada (PSAC), Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE), OPIRG-Carleton (the Ontario Public Interest Research Group at Carleton University), Quakers, Project of Heart, Amnesty International Canada and Canadian Centre for Policy Alternative and Arbeiter Ring Publishing!

     

   

Cancelled!!! All Violence against Earth is Violence to Women, How We must Look at the Past to Restore Our Future, a teach-in with a Celebrated Indigenous Woman, Lee Maracle!

This event is cancelled. 

We are so sorry for this cancellation but both Lee and Claudette are sick so we have to cancel it and hopefully we’ll organize another one in the future.

Thanks.

 

All Violence against Earth is Violence to Women,  
How We must Look at the Past to Restore Our Future, a teach-in with a Celebrated Indigenous Woman, Lee Maracle! 

source: http://wordstock.ca/2011/off-the-page-gala

Woman is the reflection of the Earth. – Grandmother Isabelle Meawasige

7pm – 9pm
Thursday, April 26, 2012
PSAC boardroom, 233 Gilmour St. Ottawa Unceded Algonquin Territory

MC: Michael Desautels, Metis & PSAC Aboriginal Program Officer

Opening by Claudette Commanda, Algonquin Nation

Drumming by Nancy Myatt

Followed by a circle response, discussion and poetry / spoken word performance by Vera Wabegijig, David Groulx and Angle Nsenga!

Admission: pay what you can ($5 suggested donation to cover the costs of this event).

To invite your friends vis facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/209333109176706/

As a part of our Honouring Indigenous Women campaign, we are inviting you to join us in a short lecture with Lee Maracle, a highly respected woman from the Stoh:lo Nation and acclaimed author, poet, educator, storyteller and performing artist.

Last summer, we were very honoured to have Lee contribute a short piece of her writing to our Honouring Indigenous Women: Hearts of Nations Vol. 1 booklet. This Spring, we are very excited and feel so privileged again that Lee is coming to Ottawa to talk to us about a very important connection. A connection that cannot be missed, oversighted or disregarded. Because our survival and our freedom depend on it:

There is a direct connection between violence against earth and violence against women.

Please click on the image to download the poster.

Then there is another connection Lee wants us to pay attention to:

There is also a connection between the past and our future; a relationship that allows us to turn around, to heal ourselves and our communities.

Are you intrigued?

Come and join us on April 26th at 233 Gilmour St. in Ottawa, Algonquin Territory! We promise it’s going to be a fascinating evening that will transform your heart, mind and spirit!

This event is brought to you by Indigenous Peoples Solidarity Movement Ottawa – www.ipsmo.org

A little be more about Lee Maracle:

Lee is currently the Aboriginal Writer-in-Residence for First Nations House, and an instructor in the Aboriginal Studies Dept. at University of Toronto. She is one of the founders of the En’owkin International School of Writing in Penticton, BC, and Cultural Director of the Centre for Indigenous Theatre in Toronto. She mentors young people on personal and cultural healing and reclamation. (CBC, 8th Fire)

Books by Lee Maracle

Source: http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/505644.I_Am_Woman
  • Bobbi Lee: Indian Rebel – 1975 (revised 1990)
  • Sojourner’s Truth and Other Stories – 1990
  • Oratory: Coming to Theory – 1990
  • Sundogs – 1991
  • Ravensong – (Press Gang Publishers)1993
  • I am Woman: A Native Perspective on Sociology and Feminism – 1988; Press Gang Publishers 1996
  • Daughters are Forever – 2002
  • Will’s Garden – 2002
  • First Wives Club: Coast Salish Style – (Theytus Books Publishing) 2010

“Embodied in my truth is the brilliance of hundreds of Native women who faced the worst that CanAmerica had to offer and dealt with it. Embodied in my brilliance is the great sea of knowledge that it took to overcome the paralysis of the colonized mind. I did not come to this clearing alone. Hundreds walked alongside me – Black, Asian and Native women whose tide of knowledge was bestowed upon me are the key to every CanAmerican’s emancipation.”

– Lee Maracle in I am Woman: A Native Perspective on Sociology and Feminism

Lee Maracle speaking at May Day Assembly 2011

The Silence is Broken, But the Violence Continues: Now What? event at the Native Canadian Centre in Toronto on July 20, 2011

The Silence is Broken, But the Violence Continues: Now What? Part II event at the Native Women’s Resource Centre in Toronto on November 24, 2011

All dis-empowered people seek empowerment. Patriarchy defines empowerment as the equivalent of power – over someone. This is the unifying philosophy that binds racism and sexism together. Power over the natural world, power over people, power over the seas, the air, time itself. Empowerment is the personal quest for oneness with nature, oneness with people, the seas, the skies, and time. The quest for power dis-empowers the very people who need to be empowered in order to alter the course of our story. 

– Lee Maracle (Racism, Sexism and Patriarchy in Returning the Gaze Essays on Racism, Feminism and Politics: p.129)