Covenant Chain Link III – Oct 19-20, 2012

A different Canada… begins with respect, relationships and openness to change.

Click for PDF of poster

Join us Friday evening, October 19th and all day Saturday, October 20th to learn more about Indigenous peoples’ perspectives on education and how to build respectful, positive and lasting partnerships.

Covenant Chain Link III will include movie screenings on Friday evening, guest speakers, panel discussions, workshops, spoken word performances, displays, resources, networking opportunities and more!

Guest speakers include:

  • Simona Arnatsiaq, Inuit rights activist and residential school survivor
  • Albert Dumont, Algonquin elder, poet and storyteller
  • Francine Lemay, translator, sister of Marcel Lemay, who was killed during the 1990 Oka crisis
  • Lois McCallum, Métis Senator and rights advocate
  • Susanna Singoorie, Inuit elder
  • Joel Westheimer, Faculty of Education, University of Ottawa

Where: Bronson Centre, Mac Hall, 211 Bronson Avenue, Ottawa

When: On October 19th (registration at 6:15 pm) & October 20th (registration at 8:30 am)

For more information: Contact Ed Bianchi ebianchi@kairoscanada.org / 613-235-9956 ext. 221 / http://www.kairoscanada.org

To register – only $45: http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/covenantchainlink

This event is co-sponsored by: KAIROS Canada, Legacy of Hope, Ottawa Catholic School Board, Presbyterian Church in Canada, Project of Heart, Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, United Church of Canada

DOWNLOADS: poster brochure

 
~~ SCHEDULE ~~

FRIDAY EVENING

  • 6:15 Registration & Gathering
  • 7:00 Presentation by Francine Lemay
  • 8:00 Film Screenings
    – Residential School Resistance Narrative Project, a collaboration with Indigenous youth
    – Why White People are Funny

SATURDAY

  • 8:30 Coffee & Gathering
  • 9:00 Ceremonial Opening with elders
    Albert Dumont
    Lois McCallum
    Susanna Singoorie
  • Panel Presentation
    The elders reflect on our theme:
    A different Canada…begins with respect, relationship and openness to change
    Moderator: Viola Thomas Truth & Reconciliation Commission
  • HEALTH BREAK
  • Focus Groups with each elder
    You are invited to join one conversation
  • 12:30 LUNCH
  • 1:30 Spoken Word Poetry
    Presentations by Indigenous and refugee youth
  • 2:00 Presentation by Professor Joel Westheimer
    Engaging citizenship in a deeper way
  • 3:00 HEALTH BREAK
  • 3:15 Open Space conversation
    One way each participant will engage in building a nation marked by relationships of reconciliation and hope for the future
  • 4:15 Closing

First Voices! First Women Speak! A Teach-in and Community Gathering

You are invited to attend First Voices! First Women Speak! A teach-in and community gathering featuring renowned Indigenous scholars, writers and artists Lee Maracle and Leanne Betasamosake Simpson, as well as Claudette Commanda, Viola Thomas, Vera Wabegijig, Moe Clark, and others!

Please click the image to download the poster.

1:30 ~ 9 pm
Friday August 24, 2012
Odawa Native Friendship Centre
12 Sterling Ave.
Ottawa, Unceded Algonquin Territory 

Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/409497419085733/

We will meet, share knowledge and generate ideas about how we – as Indigenous and non-Indigenous people – can work together in solidarity to the benefit of all living beings.

There will be a lecture, a book launch, discussion circles, spoken word performances, traditional drumming and a feast!

Please register by August 17th – space is limited! Click here (http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/firstwomenspeakto confirm your spot. The registration fee is $20 or pay what you can. You can pay in advance or at the door. 

EVERYONE IS WELCOME!

This is an amazing opportunity to have so many inspiring women in the same place, sharing their wisdom and experience! We especially want to encourage youth to participate. If you are a youth and/or non-waged, registration is free.

If you are unable to attend but would like to support this event, please make a donation by clicking here. Once the cost of the event has been covered, any additional funds will be put towards the publication of ‘Honouring Indigenous Women: Hearts of Nations- Vol. 2’, an initiative of IPSMO. For details on this publication, please see: www.ipsmo.org.

Programme

MC: Viola Thomas

Part I

1:30 Opening and welcome by Claudette Commanda with drumming by Greg Meekis and Brad Picody
2:00 Lecture by Lee Maracle: There is a direct connection between violence against the earth and violence against women: looking to the past to restore our future.
3:00 Break
3:15 Circle responses, reflections and crafting plans of action (circles lead by Claudette Commanda, Lee Maracle, and Leanne Simpson)
5:00 Spoken word and poetry performance by Vera Wabegijig
5:30 Closing for the afternoon with drumming by Greg Meekis and Brad Picody

5:45 Feast!

Part II 

7:00 Ottawa Launch of Leanne Betasamosake Simpson’s recent book: Dancing on Our Turtle’s Back: Stories of Nishnaabeg Re-Creation, Resurgence and a New Emergence with an opening by Greg Meekis and Brad Picody
8:00 Performance by Moe Clark and Leanne Simpson
8:40 Closing remarks from Lee Maracle
9:00 Closing for the day by Claudette Commanda 

*If you are unable to come for the whole day you are welcome to come only for the launch of Leanne Betasamosake Simpson’s new book ‘Dancing on our Turtle’s Back’ which will be happening from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

This event is a collaboration between Indigenous Peoples Solidarity Movement Ottawa (IPSMO) and KAIROS Canada.

About our guests and presenters:

Claudette Commanda is the Executive Director of the First Nations Confederacy of Cultural Education Centres, where she works tirelessly in the preservation and maintenance of First Nations languages, cultures, and traditions. She is also a part-time professor for the Common Law Section of the Faculty of Law, the Institute of Women’s Studies, the Aboriginal Studies Program and the Faculty of Education at the University of Ottawa. (from the Faculty of Law at the University of Ottawa)

Lee Maracle is a writer, activist and performer from the Stó:lō nation located in the area now known as British Columbia. She is currently the Aboriginal Writer-in-Residence for First Nations House, and an instructor in the Aboriginal Studies Department at the University of Toronto. Lee is one of the founders of the En’owkin International School of Writing in Penticton, BC, and Cultural Director of the Centre for Indigenous Theatre in Toronto. She mentors young people on personal and cultural healing and reclamation. (from CBC 8th Fire)

Books written by Lee Maracle:

  • Bobbi Lee: Indian Rebel – 1975 (revised 1990)
  • Sojourner’s Truth and Other Stories – 1990
  • Oratory: Coming to Theory – 1990
  • Sundogs – 1991
  • Ravensong – (Press Gang Publishers)1993
  • I am Woman: A Native Perspective on Sociology and Feminism – 1988; Press Gang Publishers 1996
  • Daughters are Forever – 2002
  • Will’s Garden – 2002
  • First Wives Club: Coast Salish Style – (Theytus Books Publishing) 2010

Leanne Betasamosake Simpson is a writer and scholar of Michi Saagiik Nishnaabeg ancestry and is a member of Alderville First Nation. She holds a Ph.D. from the University of Manitoba, is an Adjunct Professor of Indigenous Studies at Trent University and an instructor at the Centre for World Indigenous Knowledge, Athabasca University. Leanne has published three edited volumes including Lighting the Eighth Fire: The Liberation, Resurgence and Protection of Indigenous Nations (2008, Arbeiter Ring), and This is An Honour Song: Twenty Years Since the Barricades (with Kiera Ladner, 2010, Arbeiter Ring). Her recent book, Dancing on Our Turtle’s Back: Stories of Nishnaabeg Re-Creation, Resurgence and a New Emergence was published in May 2011 and turns to Nishnaabeg theory and philosophy for guidance in building and maintaining resurgence movements. It is her hope that this work will inspire the regeneration of Nishnaabeg systems of governance, language, and knowledge – systems that place women back at the centre of Kina Gchi Nishnaabeg‐ogaming. (from Leanne Simpson’s web site: http://leannesimpson.ca/)

Moe Clark. With humble beginnings as a Calgary native, Moe received mentorship from Sheri-D Wilson, who was integral in launching her career as a spoken word artist at the 2005 Calgary International Spoken Word Festival. Following the success of her debut, as well as winning the Calgary CBC Poetry Face-Off (2007), Moe released a debut album “Circle of She: Story & Song” (April ’08) and toured across Canada. Her award winning poem “Intersecting Circles” was made into a video poem in 2009 (Bravo!Fact, CCA, AFA) and became part of the permanent collection at the Peace River Museum, Archives and Mackenzie Centre. (from Moe Clark’s web site: http://www.moeclark.ca/. You can also listen to her on her web site!)

Vera Wabegijig is an Anishnaabe mother from the bear clan of the Mississauga First Nation and Wikwemikong Unceded Reserve. She is also a poet, writer and media artist. Her poetry has been printed in many anthologies including XXX NDN, Surviving in the Hour of Darkness, Breaking the Surface, Our Words, Our Revolutions, Reclaiming the Future, and Sweetgrass Grows All Around Her. Currently, Vera has completed a collection of poetry, Manomin – Wild Rice Dreams, and with her daughters Storm and Grace, will launch a new media website this summer called Ishkode/Fire. You can read her blog at: http://verawaabegeeshig.wordpress.com/.

This event is also supported by Public Service Alliance of Canada (PSAC), Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE), OPIRG-Carleton (the Ontario Public Interest Research Group at Carleton University), Quakers, Project of Heart, Amnesty International Canada and Canadian Centre for Policy Alternative and Arbeiter Ring Publishing!

     

   

ROLL WITH THE DECLARATION – “THE LAND, OUR LIFE”

~~ Please spread the word ! ~~

ROLL WITH THE DECLARATION – “THE LAND, OUR LIFE”
Participatory Indigenous Solidarity Workshop with KAIROS, IPSMO – Barriere Lake Solidarity Collective and FAMILIES OF SISTERS IN SPIRIT

We will be making BANNERS!

1 pm – 5 pm
Saturday, June 4 2011
PSAC boardroom, 233 Gilmour St. Ottawa
Unceded and Unsurrendered Algonquin Territory

This workshop is open to everyone!  Refreshment and snack will be provided.

Please R.S.V.P. through this facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=164532860277728.  Thanks!!

Special guests: Ed Bianchi, Kristen Gilchrist, Bridget Tolley, Tillis Wawatie Keye and Marcelo Saavedra-Vargas!

Come and learn about the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP), Mitchikanibikok Inik (the Algonquins of Barriere Lake) and Violence against Indigenous Women in Canada.  As a part of the discussions, we will do a powerful exercise that explores the experience and impacts of colonization – the BLANKET exercise.

In the 2nd part of the workshop, we will collectively make banners to express our solidarity with the Algonquins of Barriere Lake and Indigenous Women in this country.  These banners are a way to urge Canada to get to work on implementing this historic international agreement – UNDRIP – the minimum standard for the governments to fulfill their obligations for the right of Indigenous peoples to self-determination.  These banners will then join other banners from across the country in a demonstration and march on June 20 Day of Action organized by KARIOS.

** We will ask for donations to cover the costs of materials for this event.

For more info:

Mitchikanibikok Inik (the Algonquins of Barriere Lake): http://www.barrierelakesolidarity.org,
Violence against Indigenous Women in Canada: http://www.amnesty.ca/campaigns/sisters_overview.php,
Families of Sisters in Spirit: https://www.facebook.com/home.php?sk=group_126522944087041&ap=1,
Indigenous Peoples Solidarity Movement Ottawa: http://www.ipsmo.org,
KAIROS: http://www.kairoscanada.org, and

UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples: http://www.un.org/esa/socdev/unpfii/en/drip.html

Barriere Lake Algonquins and supporters rally for sovereignty

On December 13, 2010, over a hundred community members from Barriere Lake, along with supporters from Montreal and Toronto, drove through the snow to get to Parliament Hill to demand the government take back section 74 and restore their customary rights.

MEDIA REPORTS:

STATEMENTS:

PICTURES:

TAKE ACTION:
Please CALL or WRITE to John Duncan, Minister of Indian Affairs, demand:
* Canada and Quebec must honor the Trilateral Agreement they’ve signed with Barriere Lake in 1991
* Canada must respect Barriere Lake’s traditional government – REVERSE the forcible assimilation by rolling back Section 74 of the Indian Act

Barriere Lake Algonquins protest Conservative government’s assimilation of their traditional political governance system: Political parties, major unions, Indigenous groups call for respect for community’s Inherent rights

OTTAWA, traditional Algonquin territory, June 15 /CNW Telbec/ – A broad network of political parties, unions, human rights and Indigenous organizations are rallying today with the Barriere Lake Algonquins in Ottawa at 11:30 am, in front of Indian Affairs Minister Chuck Strahl’s office at Bank and Wellington, demanding that the Government of Canada stop attempting to assimilate the community’s traditional political governance system.

Barriere Lake is one of the few First Nations in the country that have never been under the Indian Act’s electoral system, continuing to operate under a traditional political governance system that is connected to their use of the land. Despite there being a broad community consensus opposing Indian Act elections, Indian Affairs has announced they will try to impose them on August 19, 2010.

“Community members refuse to accept this unilateral and draconian attempt to wipe out the way we govern ourselves. The government is attacking our governance system because it is intimately tied to our continuing use and protection of the land. We will defend our rights and customs for the sake of our generation and the generations to come,” says Tony Wawatie, a Barriere Lake community spokesperson.

“The federal government has consistently tried to violate agreements and interfere with the internal affairs of this First Nation, all in an effort to access the natural resources of their traditional territory. Obviously, they hope to weaken this community to the point where the logging companies can take over. It is shameful,” says Elizabeth May, Leader of the Green Party of Canada.

Canada and Quebec are refusing to implement binding agreements dating back to the 1991 Trilateral Agreement, a landmark sustainable development agreement praised by the United Nations and the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples. Canada has been in breach of the Agreement since 2001. Quebec is violating the agreement by refusing to implement the 2006 joint recommendations of two former Quebec Cabinet Ministers, Quebec special representative John Ciaccia and Barriere Lake special representative Clifford Lincoln. The 2006 recommendations include giving Barriere Lake a $1.5 million share of the $100 million in resource revenue that comes out of their territory annually, and forest plans to harmonize logging operations with the Algonquin’s land use. Quebec has just issued cutting permits to logging companies in Barriere Lake’s traditional territory, while refusing to respect the terms of the Trilateral Agreement.

“We’re joining the community in demanding that the Harper government respect the inherent right of First Nations to self-determination and customary self-government,” says Denis Lemelin, National President of the Canadian Union of Postal Workers.

Representatives from the New Democratic Party and the Indigenous Environmental Network will be attending, and the demonstration is endorsed by KAIROS, Polaris, and the Indigenous Peoples Solidarity Movement of Ottawa.

The Algonquin Nation Secretariat has also issued a press release supporting the community.

For further information: Media contacts: Norman Matchewan, community spokesperson: 514-893-8283; Tony Wawatie, community spokesperson: 819-860-4121