Nov25: Call for Solidarity in Ottawa (John Moore)

A CALL FOR SOLIDARITY IN OTTAWA: Come show support for unjustly convicted Ojibway man John Moore as his struggle against the racist criminal justice system reaches the floor of Parliament!

WHEN: Thursday, November 25, at 10am (note new time – 10am! … and get there early to leave time to go through security)

WHERE: Parliamentary gallery

WHAT: On November 25, 2010, Sudbury MP Glenn Thibeault will be presenting a petition in Parliament calling for the Department of Justice to order a judicial review of John Moore’s unjust conviction for second degree murder in 1978. Moore’s trials were tainted with systemic racism, and the law under which he was convicted was ruled unconstitutional in the late 1980s in another case. Yet Moore continues to bear the burden of the stigma of this conviction.

This is a pivotal moment in Moore’s long fight for justice. He and supporters will be traveling from Sudbury to Ottawa for this event, to be visible and present in the gallery in Parliament while Thibeault presents the petition. We are also tentatively planning a media conference for after the presentation of the petitions. Come join us!

If possible, please also let us know that you will be coming. We’re trying to determine how much space we need to reserve in the Parliamentary visitors’ gallery. You can email scottneigh@sympatico.ca or call 705-688-8694.

BACKGROUND: John Moore, an Ojibway man from Serpent River First Nation, was convicted of second degree murder in 1978. This happened despite the fact that he was not present when the crime was committed and had no role whatsoever in perpetrating it, and was based solely on him having spent time earlier that day with the individuals who committed the crime. His trials were tainted with systemic racism. The law under which he was convicted was ruled unconstitutional in the late 1980s in another case, and no one would be convicted under similar circumstances today. Yet Moore continues to bear the burden of the stigma of this conviction. He must regularly report to a parole officer and must ask permission if he wishes to leave the city of Sudbury, Ontario, which is impeding his freedom of movement and his capacity to find meaningful work.

Moore has been actively involved in struggles for social justice in Sudbury for many years. Over the last several months, Moore and supporters in Sudbury, Ottawa, Toronto, and Vancouver have collected over 3000 signatures on a petition asking the Department of Justice to order a judicial review of his conviction. On November 25, 2010, all of this organizing work will reach the national stage. It is crucial that Moore have as many supporters present as  possible.

For more background information on Moore’s struggle for justice, see  http://justiceandfreedomforjohnmoore.blogspot.com

To contact the Justice and Freedom for John Moore committee, please email  sudburyawo@gmail.com or scottneigh@sympatico.ca or call 705-688-8694.

To join the Justice for John Moore Facebook group, go to http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=179780527688

To RSVP on Facebbok for the Nov 25 presentation of the petition in Parliament, go to: http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=163470690352109

Advertisements

Organizing For Justice workshops

The Organizing For Justice conference happens from Oct15-18 in Ottawa/Gatineau. It is focused on social, economic and environmental justice and healthy communities. This year’s theme is ‘Grassroots Responses to the Economic and Environmental Crisis’.

IPSMO will be tabling as part of the Book/Info-Fair on Saturday Oct 17 at 440 Albert St, as well as helping to put on two of the workshop panels that day:

12:30pm – ‘Queer Struggles in an Economic Crisis‘, with:

  • Nadijah Robinson from Agitate! Ottawa
  • Jeremy Dias from Jer’s Vision
  • Percy Lezard from 2 Spirited People of the 1st Nations
  • Gary Kinsman, Author and Activist

2:30pm – ‘Indigenous Peoples and the Law‘, with:

  • John Moore, a First Nations person from Serpent River First Nation currently living in Sudbury who has been fighting for justice for nearly 23 years against racism in the Canadian Court System
  • Romola Trebilcock from Circle of All Nations, who will be speaking on the legacy of Donald Marshall Jr both in terms of the criminal system and land rights issues
  • Beverly J. Pyke from the Akwesasne Peoples Fire, who will be speaking about the current community resistance to the border situation, as well as some history

Details about the conference can be found at www.OrganizingForJustice.ca or by contacting org4justice@gmail.com or 613-656-5498

The conference consists of five different events:

  • Thurs Oct 15, 6:30 pm – Keynote Panel Discussion, at the Ottawa Public Library main branch auditorium (120 Metcalfe St)
  • Fri Oct 16, 7:00pm-midnight – Music, Theatre, Spoken Word and Social Event, at the Atomic Rooster (303 Bank St)
  • Sat Oct 17, 10:00am-8:00pm – Full day of Workshops, Book/Info-fair, followed by Community Dinner at 6pm, at 440 Albert St (the Old Ottawa Technical High School)
  • Sat Oct 17, 7:00pm – Table Ronde (panel discussion in French), at le Dépanneur Sylvestre, 9 Fortier, Gatineau
  • Sun Oct 18, 10:30am-4:30pm – Ateliers [workshops in French], at UQO, Pavillon Lucien-Brault, 101 rue Saint Jean Bosco, Gatineau

June 10: Support John Moore

For Immediate Release.
June 05th, 2009

Contact: johnpower1955@hotmail.com
or call to leave a message at toll free 1-877-248-4133

JOHN MOORE: AN INNOCENT ABORIGINAL MAN STILL FIGHTING FOR JUSTICE AND FREEDOM IN CANADA

Justice and Freedom for John C. Moore invites you to a press conference and support rally June 10th, 2009, from 2 pm – 3 pm at the Human Rights Monument, corner of Elgin and Lisgar Streets, Ottawa (In case of rain it will be held in the Canadian Union of Postal Workers boardroom, 377 Bank Street.)

JOHN MOORE: AN INNOCENT ABORIGINAL MAN WRONGFULLY CONVICTED

John Moore is an Ojibway man from Serpent River First Nation (near Sault Ste. Marie) who spent 10 years (from 1978 to 1988) in Millhaven Penitentiary for a murder he did not commit. John Moore was convicted of 2nd degree murder in 1978 under a law which was repealed in 1987. The evidence against John was entirely circumstantial and hearsay. The same evidence for which he spent time in jail would no longer stand up in a court of law.

Institutionalized racism was a key factor leading to his false conviction by an all-white jury. His wrongful conviction continues to follow him today as he reports to a parole officer on a monthly basis and must be granted permission to leave the city of Sudbury, Ontario. This is impeding his freedom of movement and capacity to find meaningful work. John has repeatedly asked for a judicial review of his case, and for exoneration, but these requests have been ignored. He is now taking his struggle for justice to Ottawa on June 10th.

At the media conference speakers will demonstrate once again how our justice  system has convicted an innocent man. As stated in similar cases by the Supreme Court of Canada, there is a very realistic potential of racial prejudice in our criminal justice system. Because of institutionalized racism in the criminal justice system John Moore never received a fair trial.

At the time of his conviction, Canadian law (this provision was repealed in 1987) held that even though there was clear evidence to show John was not at the murder scene but in fact with other people, he could be found guilty of the crime because, on an “objective standard,” he ought to have known the crime could have happened.

John argues that his conviction was a case of guilt by association. Not only an association with the men who actually took a man’s life, but judicial prejudice that came with being an indigenous man in a non-indigenous justice system. “There is no doubt in my mind that I was convicted because of racism,” said John.

CHARTER OF RIGHTS AND FREEDOMS: JURY OF ONE’S PEERS

According to the Charter of Rights and Freedoms a person is to be tried by a jury of their peers. However, in both of Moore’s trials he was convicted by an all White member jury. Both trials took place in Sault Ste. Marie, in the Algoma District. There are over 30 First Nations communities in the Algoma District and three First Nations communities within in the city limits, yet there was not a single First Nations person on the two juries that convicted Moore. As a First Nations man John Moore was not tried by a jury of my peers.

DNA EXTRACTION CONFIRMS INNOCENCE

On November 14, 2006 Mr. Moore was served a summons to extract DNA samples from his body. One thing is crystal clear now, without a doubt, that Moore’s DNA sample confirms that he was not at the scene of the crime and it will totally exonerate him from the 1978 murder of Mr. Donald Lanthier

PROTEST IN OTTAWA

On June 10, 2009, from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Human Rights Monument, corner of Elgin and Lisgar Streets

(In case of rain it will be in the CUPW boardroom, 377 Bank Street.)

Mr. John C. Moore will be coming to Ottawa, to address this injustice to the media in this country’s capital.

Presentations at the media conference by:

A local Anishinaabe Elder, William Morin – Chief Administrator of the First Peoples National Party, Denis Michel – John Moore’s Lawyer, a support statement from NDP MP Glenn Thibeault (Sudbury), Canadian Union of Postal Workers (CUPW). Sudbury Against War and Occupation, and others to be announced.

This event is also endorsed by the Indigenous People’s Solidarity Movement – Ottawa.

INJUSTICE SYSTEM
Join us to help shed light on injustice in our legal system. Let us not repeat the mistakes of the past, or how our justice system failed Donald  Marshall, David Milgaard, Wilson Napoose, Guy Paul Morin and many others.

For more information on John Moore’s case you can visit
http://homepages.cambrianc.on.ca/gbcooper/johnmoore

Or visit John Moore’s FACEBOOK page.

To contact John Moore do so by email: johnpower1955@hotmail.com
or call to leave a message at toll free 1-877-248-4133