Thurs June 19 – Indigenous Resistance & Solidarity: Against Pipelines, For The Land – at the Mayfair Theatre

UPDATE:
here is the followup post from the event, with all the information and links of projects and upcoming events:
https://ipsmo.wordpress.com/2014/06/20/june19-followup/

 

In the lead-up to National Aboriginal Day (June 21), we’re happy to invite you to our exciting upcoming film night:

Indigenous Resistance and Solidarity
Against Pipelines, For The Land

Thursday June 19th, 6:30pm
at the Mayfair Theatre, 1074 Bank St
Ottawa (unceded Algonquin territory)

Additionally, from 8:45-10pm there will be an informal post-event social
Hosted by Southminster United Church (15 Aylmer Ave at Bank, one block from the theatre)

This event will feature four short films:

  • the new half-hour documentary being released this month about the Unist’ot’en resistance camp out in BC, that is blocking the construction of a number of pipelines and reasserting their Indigenous sovereignty.
  • a shorter film from 2013 that highlights cross-Canada Indigenous resistance to tar sands pipelines
  • video reporting of the police repression of anti-fracking protests in Elsipogtog last fall
  • an interview about anti-oppression, decolonization and responsible allyship from the 2012 PowerShift Canada climate justice conference(scroll down for full film titles / descriptions / preview links)

There will be an opening from Albert Dumont, “South Wind” (Algonquin, Kitigan Zibi)

We will also have speakers to profile local efforts and opportunities to get more involved.


We hope you’re excited too!

Here’s how you can to help support this event:

  • Mark your calendar and ask someone if they’d like to come with you!
  • If you’re on Facebook, invite 10 (or so) friends to the event
  • If you’ve got somewhere to put it, print out a poster (or 10)
  • Please share this link with your contacts

 

This event is hosted by us, IPSMO: Indigenous Peoples Solidarity Movement Ottawa, in partnership with Ecology Ottawa, the Peoples Social Forum, Council of Canadians, and CPAWS – Ottawa Valley (Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society).

There is a suggested donation of $5 – $15 at the door, as it is a fundraiser (but no one will be turned away for lack of funds). Monies raised will go to the Unist’ot’en camp as well as to the various filmmakers’ projects, and to Indigenous and solidarity participation in the Peoples Social Forum this August in Ottawa.

Hope to see you there!

 

Accessibility Notes:

  • The Mayfair Theatre has side entrances that are wheelchair accessible.
    The washrooms are not, but Shoppers Drug Mart (located next door) does have accessible washrooms.
  • Please refrain from wearing perfumes, colognes or other scented products
  • Please contact us if you require bus tickets

Contact: ipsmo@riseup.nethttp://www.ipsmo.org
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Films / descriptions / preview links:

RESIST: The Unist’ot’en’s Call to the Land (2014, 30min)
… is a documentary film that visits the fourth annual Environmental Action Camp, hosted on unceded Wet’suwet’en territory by the Unist’ot’en(C’ihlts’ehkhyu/Big Frog) clan. By re-instituting a Free, Prior, and Informed Consent Protocol on the bridge over Wedzin Kwah into their traditional territories, the Unist’ot’en are reasserting their indigenous sovereignty and standing up to industry and government who want to destroy their lands The focus of the film includes the exploration of the environmental, legal, and social issues surrounding hydraulic fracturing, tar sands, and the proposed Kinder-Morgan, Pacific Trails Pipeline, and Enbridge Northern Gateway Pipeline projects in British Columbia. The film’s themes also include indigenous sovereignty and decolonization, as well as documenting one of the most important resistance camps in North America and the movement it is a part of.
http://vimeo.com/74788986

Kahsatstenhsera: Indigenous Resistance to Tar Sands Pipelines (2013, 10min)
Kahsatstenhsera gah-sad-sdanh-se-ra is a Kanienkeha:ka (Mohawk) word that means Strength in Unity. This short documentary details contemporary Indigenous resistance to tar sands pipeline expansion, in particular the Line 9 and Energy East pipelines, which threaten the health of our territories in the northeast of Turtle Island. It includes the voices and perspectives of Dene, Wolastiqiyik, Mi’kmaq, Anishinaabe, Haudenosaunee and Wet’suwet’en land defenders.
http://reclaimturtleisland.com/videos/

Showdown at Highway 134 (2013, 5min)
With some of the only video from behind police lines, subMedia.tv witnessed the brutal raid by the Royal Colonial Mounted Police on the Mi’kmaq blockade of fracking equipment. But the fierce response of the community in defense of the warriors was also captured on camera. We bring you the real story about what really went down on Highway 134, the story that the corporate media doesn’t want you to see.
http://www.submedia.tv/showdown-at-highway-134/

Harsha Walia on Anti-Oppression, Decolonization and Responsible Allyship (2012, 10min)
“Given the devastating cultural, spiritual, economic, linguistic and political impacts of colonialism on Indigenous people in Canada, any serious attempt by non-natives at allying with Indigenous struggles must entail solidarity in the fight against colonization.” Recorded at the PowerShift Canada 2012 conference in Ottawa, unceded Algonquin territory.
https://ipsmo.wordpress.com/2012/11/01/harsha-walia-video-interview/

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Posters:
(please consider printing/displaying one or more posters
– be sure to check the box ‘fit/shrink to paper size’ when printing)

Facebook event page:
(if you’re on Facebook, please RSVP and invite your Ottawa friends)

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May 8 & 10 – Nonviolence Conference keynotes: Rajagopal P.V. / Clayton Thomas-Muller / Michel Thusky

Conference: Nonviolence: A Weapon of the Strong

TWO OF THE TALKS WILL BE FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

May 8 – Thursday evening, 7:30 to 8:30 PM
with renowned nonviolent leader and activist, Rajagopal P.V.: Nonviolence, a Tool for Social Change.

May 10 – Saturday evening, 7:00 to 8:30 PM
with Clayton Thomas Muller of Idle No More, and Michel Thusky, an Algonquin Elder from Barriere Lake, both Indigenous leaders and activists.

LOCATION:
Both public talks will be in the Amphitheatre (room 1124),
Saint Paul University, 223 Main St, Ottawa.

The rest of the conference information can be found at: http://ustpaul.ca/en/conference-nonviolence-a-weapon-of-the-strong-mahatma-gandhi-advancing-nonviolence-spirituality-and-social-transformation_1601_17.htm

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About the speakers:

Rajagopal P.V. of Ekta Parishad is the foremost leader, teacher, and practitioner of nonviolence in India. From South India, Rajagopal began his work on nonviolence when he spent six years working in the Chambal region. He spent 15 years working with Indian rural youth through nonviolent and community building training programs. In 1993, Rajagopal became the Secretary of the Gandhi Peace Foundation. In 2007, he organized and led a large nonviolentmarch, Janadesh, where 25,000 people walked from Gwalior to Delhi. In 2012, after preparing for four years, Rajagopal organized a similar, although larger, nonviolent march where 100,000 people walked, again from Gwalior to Delhi, for land reform, and were successful in negotiating their requirements for sustainable land regulations. Rajagopal, along with the work of Ekta Parishad, is a world leader on nonviolent struggles, training and actions.

Clayton Thomas-Muller, of the Mathais Colomb Cree Nation (Pukatawagan) in Northern Manitoba, Canada, is an activist for indigenous self-determination and environmental justice. Based out of Ottawa, Clayton is the co-director of the Indigenous TarSands (ITS) Campaign of the Polaris Institute as well as a volunteer organizer with the Defenders of the Land-Idle No More national campaign known as Sovereignty Summer. Clayton is involved in many initiatives to support the building of an inclusive movement globally for energy and climate justice. He serves on the board of the Global Justice Ecology Project, Canadian based Raven Trust and Navajo Nation based, Black Mesa Water Coalition. Clayton has traveled extensively domestically and internationally leading Indigenous delegations to lobby United Nations bodies including the UN framework Convention on Climate Change, UN Earth Summits and the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues.

Michel Thusky is an Elder and spokesperson from the Algonquin community of Barriere Lake. He is involved with the Barriere Lake Solidarity activities, and is often a spokesperson for his community. Several documentaries, including the recent film Honour Your Word, have been made about the issues in Barriere Lake, and the lack of attention paid to the injustices suffered by the Algonquin community who live there. Mr. Thusky often addresses the various struggles, blockages and community identity in the context of his people’s struggle to defend their land, their way of life, and their traditional governance system against attacks by the colonial governments of Quebec and Canada.

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May 4 – Open Meeting for the Indigenous Peoples’ Solidarity Movement Ottawa

 

Are you interested in doing Indigenous solidarity organizing?

Do you want to learn more about how to effectively oppose colonialism and to support Indigenous people, communities and nations?

If so, come out to the IPSM Ottawa’s upcoming open meeting, and get involved!

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Open Meeting for the Indigenous Peoples’ Solidarity Movement – Ottawa (IPSMO)

Image by Tania Willard.
Image by Tania Willard.

Sunday, May 4th at 2:00pm

Jack Purcell Community Centre, Rm 101
320 Jack Purcell Lane, near Elgin and Gilmour (Bus # 5 & 14)

www.facebook.com/events/264685173702861

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Everyone Welcome!

Wheelchair Accessible

Contact us if you require ASL/LSF, bus tickets, child care:
ipsmo@riseup.nethttp://www.ipsmo.org

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We are currently one of the anchor groups working on organizing an Indigenous Solidarity Assembly during the Peoples’ Social Forum (PSF) in August of 2014.

In addition to this we will be doing other organizing to support the Forum, including activities such as designing and doing workshops about Indigenous Solidarity similar to, for example, our Indigenous Solidarity for Settlers workshop.

 

Indigenous Peoples Solidarity Movement Ottawa (IPSMO)
Indigenous Peoples Solidarity Movement Ottawa (IPSMO)

About the IPSM Ottawa

The Indigenous Peoples’ Solidarity Movement of Ottawa started as a group of activists who did some solidarity organizing in support of the six nations land reclamation near Caledonia, in the summer of 2006.

Since then we have been doing Indigenous solidarity organizing in many varied ways and in support of many different people, issues, communities and nations. Some of this work includes supporting the Tyendinaga Mohawks during their occupation a quarry on their territory, supporting the Ardoch Algonquin and the Shabot Obaadjiwan First Nations in their opposition to a uranium nine on their territory, and supporting local anti-racist organizing at Carleton University.

Most of the work that we have done in the past 6 years, however, has been in support of the Algonquin community of Barriere Lake and supporting initiatives and groups struggling for justice for missing and murdered Indigenous women, girls and two-spirits.

 

Our Basis of Unity:

The Indigenous Peoples Solidarity Movement – Ottawa (IPSMO) is a grassroots organization that directly supports indigenous peoples in diverse struggles for justice. We also work within communities to challenge the lies and half-truths about indigenous peoples and colonization that dominate Canadian society. The organization is open to both indigenous and non-indigenous people, and focuses on local and regional campaigns.

As we act in solidarity with indigenous people, we build relationships where we can learn from indigenous cultures. By doing this, we can further decolonize ourselves, and so learn to better challenge the racist and colonial ideas that dominate Canadian society.

We provide support to actions and campaigns for Indigenous sovereignty, self-determination, defense of the land, environmental protection, cultural revitalization, and the honouring of treaties and agreements.

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Mon Feb 24: Indigenous journeyers complete 1700 km trek

NEWS RELEASE
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Monday February 24, 2014

Indigenous journeyers complete 1700 km trek

Forty-nine days ago, a group of First Nations adults and youth began an epic spiritual journey from Attawapiskat First Nation by James Bay to Ottawa. The twenty-five Indigenous walkers arrive in Ottawa this morning. Some of them have walked 1700 kms!

Concerned about broken treaties, land and water protection, and human rights issues the Omushkegowuk Walkers vowed to take their steps back by walking all the way to Ottawa. They have a message to share when their journey ends at Parliament Hill today at 12:30 PM.

They’ll start at Carling and Bronson this morning at 10:30 AM, be greeted by Glebe high school students as they pass and head up First Avenue to First Avenue primary school for 11:00 AM. From there they take O’Connor to Isabella and then Elgin Street up to the Human Rights Monument at Lisgar Street for 12 NOON.

If you are not coming to the Hill for the welcome – please show these Indigenous Journeyers some support by slowing down along the route and giving them a cheer, a wave or a honk for support.

After a brief ceremony at the Human Rights Monument, and likely joined by hundreds of well-wishers, the Omushkegowuk Walkers are to march up Elgin to Parliament at 12:10 PM.

On the way, Ottawa First Nations drum group the O-Town Boyz, the Walkers and other supporters will stop for a Healing Song at 12:20 PM in front of the Prime Minister’s office on Wellington.

At 12:30 PM Reclaiming our steps, past present and future Walkers arrive at Parliament Hill. Please join us in welcoming these heroes from the north. The speaking, drumming and dancing event will go until 2:30 PM.

A farewell Pipe Ceremony and Community Potluck Feast for the Walkers is planned for Wednesday, February 26th.

To learn about the journey, please visit their facebook page Reclaiming Our Steps Past, Present & Future

For more detailed information about the events today and on February 26th please visit https://www.facebook.com/events/636151979779260

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Niigaan: In Conversation – Red Man Laughing Live Podcast (VIDEO)

niigaan-rml
 

Reflecting upon 1 year of Idle No More – Biiskaabiiyang: Returning to Ourselves, featuring (L-R): Wab Kinew, Celina Cada-Matasawagon, Geraldine King, Leanne Simpson, Serpent River FN Chief Isadore Day, Lee Maracle, Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs Grand Chief Derek Nepinak, and host Ryan McMahon.

Intros by Niigaan organizers Linda Nothing and Jocelyn Formsma, followed by stand-up segment by Ryan McMahon and then the panel discussion.

Hoop dance by Theland Kicknosway (separate video).

December 10, 2013 at the National Arts Centre, Ottawa.

*Note: At the event, there was a special announcement from Ryan McMahon: Red Man Laughing will be coming to CBC Radio this year!
 

Ryan’s notes on the discussion:

Winter Time is the time of year where the earth becomes covered in snow. It’s a time for rest and reflection. Last winter we rose. We did not rest, we did not reflect. We took to the malls, the streets, and the hills. The community rallied around, there was a desperate feeling, people gathered at teach-ins, the scent of medicines was everywhere. We need to get that energy back. Niigaan: In Conversation asked ourselves, what happened to the fire? The problems are still here, we still have work to do. Let’s get together as a community and talk about our future.

A few highlights from this talk that you should listen for are:

  • Lee Maracle talking about the prophecy that told us that we’d be teaching the world about the power of our drums & community.
  • Chief Isadore Day breaking down the importance of self care and taking care of the homefires.
  • Leanne Simpson sharing her thoughts on the Wampum Belt – letting us know what the belt DOES mean to her and what it DOES NOT mean to her.
  • A spirited and heart felt discussion on education for Native Youth (FNEA rejections) – we can/need to take better care of our young people as they head to institutions.

 

Websites: Niigaan.caRedManLaughing.com

Video (2hr20min) by Greg Macdougall, EquitableEducation.ca
Or listen to the podcast at Red Man Laughing
 

 

Theland Kicknosway – Hoop Dance:

 

July 24-28: Asinabka Film & Media Arts Festival comes to Ottawa for the second year!


 

The Asinabka Film & Media Arts Festival – http://asinabkafestival.org – is bringing powerful and thought-provoking art and film to Ottawa for another summer. The Festival, to be held July 24-28 2013, provides an opportunity for Indigenous peoples to tell their own stories and showcase their rich and vibrant culture in the National Capital Region.

This year, the Festival will feature a wide array of programming, including a series of films that examine deep spiritual connections to the land and the important role that women play in Aboriginal communities. The Festival will also focus on human rights and sovereignty issues raised by the Idle No More movement.

The Festival will revolve around strong programming with over 10 film screenings, including a delicious pre-festival “Dinner And A Movie” night at Mitla Café, an outdoor opening and film screening on Victoria Island, film programs at the National Gallery of Canada and Club SAW, and a “Gallery Crawl” with curated art exhibitions at Gallery 101 and Fall Down Gallery.

 

Highlights of the Festival include:

• A screening of the documentary “The People of the Kattawapiskak River” that exposes the housing crisis faced by 1,700 Cree in Northern Ontario. Director Alanis Obomsawin will be in attendance and participate in a Q & A session led by Journalist Waubgeshig Rice.

• An opening night outdoor screening on Victoria Island, showing the critically acclaimed film “The Lesser Blessed” by Director Anita Doron and award winning Writer/Producer Richard Van Camp.

• A “Gallery Crawl” event including the opening of two person art exhibition “In-Digital” at Gallery 101 with the artists Jason Baerg and Christian Chapman in attendance, followed by a “Misko (Red) Party” at Fall Down Gallery with artwork by local and emerging artists, and an evening of multi-disciplinary performance with spoken word, live painting, experimental video-art, and live music.

• A “Dinner & A Movie” Night at Mitla Café (July 18 & 19), serving authentic Oaxacan Cuisine prepared by Chef Ana, and screening Director Roberto Olivares Ruiz’s film “Silvestre Pantaleón”.

• A weeklong video production program called “Video Works”, facilitated by Indigenous Culture & Media Innovations (ICMI), and held at the SAW Video Media Art Centre. Work produced during the program will be screened on the final night of the Festival.

• A “Late Night” film program at Club SAW titled “Fabulous Fantasies”, screening 8 short films that are quirky, humorous, dystopian, futuristic, queer, and fabulous.

 

“This event promises to be an excellent venue for advancing works from emerging and established Indigenous artists, both nationally and internationally,” stated Asinabka Co-Directors Howard Adler and Chris Wong. “Such a festival also has the potential to help Canadians better understand the realities of Indigenous peoples lives and experiences.”

This year’s Asinabka Film & Media Art Festival will feature more free programming then ever before. A large proportion of the Festival’s programming will be offered free of charge, including three film programs in partnership with the National Gallery of Canada and its “Sakahàn: International Indigenous Art exhibition”. As a result, the Festival will highlight Indigenous films not only from Canada, but also from Brazil, Russia, Australia, and the United States.

 

For more information about the Festival, please go to: http://asinabkafestival.org

For more information about the Festival, please contact Howard Adler at asinabkafestival at gmail.com or 613.889.9559

 

The Asinabka Film & Media Art Festival would like to acknowledge funding support from the Ontario Arts Council, an agency of the Government of Ontario, as well as funding support from the City of Ottawa. We also thank our Festival Partners, the National Gallery of Canada, Saw Video, Gallery 101, Saw Gallery, ICMI, Wapikoni Mobile, Fall Down Gallery and Aboriginal Experiences.
 

Fundraising campaigns: Book, Film, Website Magazine

Greetings / ahneen / kwey kwey,

Today we are sending out information about three fundraising campaigns.

We hope you will take a look at them, and consider seeing if you can
support, and also if you can spread the word, to help these worthwhile
projects.

Miigwetch!

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QUICK LINKS:

Book: Honouring Indigenous Women: Hearts of Nations v2
http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/the-launch-of-honouring-indigenous-women-hearts-of-nations-vol-2

Film: The Sixties Scoop: A Hidden Generation documentary
http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/the-sixties-scoop-a-hidden-generation-documentary–2

Website magazine: Intercontinental Cry – People Land Truth 2013
http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/people-land-truth

… more info on each follows:

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Honouring Indigenous Women: Hearts of Nations vol2 book

We are seeking funds to print 800 copies of this book in preparation for a
multi-city launch of this anthology for an Autumn 2013 release which
includes Vancouver, Edmonton, Regina, Toronto, Peterborough, Ottawa and
Manistee. These launches will reach more people to whom we also would like
to share the wealth of knowledge and inspiration this book offers to
empower all peoples to tell and share their stories.

When the Honouring Indigenous Women campaign was launched in 2011, many
Indigenous women praised this initiative as it was creating a place for
Indigenous women’s voices while offering a complimentary space to allies
and alliances. Indigenous women recognized the importance of this space as
their voices were not marginalized or on the peripheral. As we have
learned, the mainstream media often reinforces stereotypes and patriarchal
thinking towards Indigenous women in their stories, and often does not
portray the whole picture.

This anthology is a re-presentation of Indigenous women by Indigenous
women by  sharing lived experiences, realities and offering unique
perspectives of each contributors’ worldview.

It is a celebration and a practice of freedom for both its creators and
readers.

Fund it: http://igg.me/at/HIW-vol-2
Website: http://thesoundofmyheart.weebly.com/

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The Sixties Scoop: A Hidden Generation documentary film

Q&A with Filmmaker, Colleen Cardinal

Q. Why did you embark on this project?

A. There needs to be an awakening in Canada to the realities of Indigenous
peoples—especially us telling our own stories to raise awareness, educate
and support our own healing journeys. My lived experiences include being
caught up in a deliberate attempt at cultural genocide—death by social
policy. When I first learned there were thousands of adoptees that went
through similar experiences of cultural loss, loneliness and abuse as I
did, I wanted to support them and make sure their stories were validated
and shared.

We will share what it was like to grow up in non-Indigenous families,
without their culture, language, lands, identity and relations. This
deliberate attempt at assimilation of Indigenous people in Canada and
enforced federal policy through Children’s Services or Children’s Aid
Societies left the survivors feeling disconnected from themselves and
their people. Robert Commanda will also lend his voice and insights about
a class action lawsuit against the Ontario provincial government that he
has been fighting in the courts for the past four years. The documentary
will also include my son Sage Hele, who will speak about how
inter-generational trauma, abuse and discrimination shaped his own life. I
am grateful to those involved with this project for their resilience,
passion and openness to sharing their stories and healing journeys.

Q: Why is this documentary so important NOW?

A: I feel this is important because of the growing need for understanding,
awareness and education for mainstream Canadian audiences. The Idle No
More movement and the resurgence of Indigenous culture and awareness has
Indigenous people asking questions and awakening their need to reclaim
their identity. I also feel this documentary needs to be shared so that
other 60′s Scoop survivors know they are not alone.

Fund it: http://igg.me/p/456883
Film website: http://ahiddengeneration.wordpress.com
Videos of speakers from trailer launch / community gathering:
http://equitableeducation.ca/2013/the-sixties-scoop

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People Land Truth 2013 – Intercontinental Cry magazine

Intercontinental Cry (IC) Magazine needs your help. As an independent,
volunteer-run magazine, we are proudly funded by our readers; however, we
are currently facing some financial difficulties that threatens the
continuation of our work, including the publication of our 9th anniversary
magazine, PEOPLE LAND TRUTH 2013

Now in its 9th year online, Intercontinental Cry (IC) is one of the only
grassroots online publications dedicated to the world’s Indigenous
Peoples. So far we’ve written stories for 497 Indigenous Nations in 190
countries; authored 74 monthly reports and highlighted more than 400
outstanding videos and films. What’s more, we’ve done it all for free.

In an effort to highlight some of our work, we decided last June to bring
the best of IC to paper with an anniversary magazine called PEOPLE LAND
TRUTH (PLT).  In the spirit of sharing, we made an eBook version that was
free to the public; the print version, meanwhile, was available for a
modest donation. We did the same thing six months later with INDIGENOUS
STRUGGLES 2012: DISPATCHES FROM THE FOURTH WORLD, our first annual
briefing on the global indigenous movement.

Fund it: http://igg.me/at/people-land-truth
Alt fund it: http://intercontinentalcry.org/donate/
Website: http://intercontinentalcry.org/
Publications: http://intercontinentalcry.org/publications/

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