The People’s Exhibition of Barrick at Museum of Nature!

You are invited to the People’s Exhibition of Barrick! 

4:30 pm, Tuesday, April 24 2012
In front of the main entrance of the Canadian Museum of Nature (facing Metcalfe St.)
240 McLeod St. Ottawa, unceded Algonquin Territory

To invite your friends via Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/196060743844592/

Barrick Out of The Canadian Museum of Nature!

On Tuesday, April 24, Ottawa’s Museum of Nature will celebrate a new partnership with Barrick Gold Corporation with the unveiling of the “Barrick Salon”. Barrick Gold is a Canadian mining company based in Toronto with horrendous records of environmental destruction, and human, labor and Indigenous rights violations around the world, including but not limiting to Chile, Argentina, Peru, Tanzania and Papua New Guinea.

This newly established public-private partnership between the Canadian Museum of Nature and Barrick Gold Corporation is fundamentally unacceptable! Because it contradicts the museum’s most important corporate value – “Respect for People and Nature”.

Please come and join us outside of the museum as we present the “People’s Exhibition of Barrick”, showcasing Barrick’s destructive mines around the world

We will be joined by Barrick-impacted community members and special guests to share knowledge about the impacts of this dangerous partnership:

  • The Diaguita Huascoaltinos Indigenous and Agricultural Community, impacted by Barrick Gold’s binational Pascua Lama project on the border of Chile and Argentina,
  • The Archuar Indigenous Community of the northern Peruvian Amazon,
  • Catherine Coumans of Mining Watch Canada, and
  • Sakura Saunders, the editor for Protestbarrick.net

For more information about Barrick Gold and the communities impacted by Barrick’s operation: Protestbarrick.net.

This public-private partnership is offensive, we want Barrick Out of The Canadian Museum of Nature!

WHO IS BARRICK GOLD?

Barrick Gold is the world’s largest gold mining company, founded and chaired by Peter Munk. With a former Prime Minister on their board and former executives sitting on the board of the Canadian Pension Plan, Barrick enjoys government funding and diplomatic support.

WHY PROTEST BARRICK?

In countries like Australia, Chile, Papua New Guinea and Tanzania, Barrick takes advantage of inadequate and poorly enforced regulatory controls to rob indigenous peoples of their lands, destroy sensitive ecosystems and agricultural land, support brutal police and security operations, and sue anyone who tries to report on it. In the context of this libel chill, Barrick has branded itself as the socially responsible mining giant and boasts its listing on the Dow Jones Sustainability Index.

Behind the scenes, Barrick has been singled out as the company most involved in the lobbying effort to stop private member’s bill C-300.

Source: Protestbarrick.net.

Protest: Barrick Gold AGM 2011

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Nov2: Undermining Indigenous Rights

Undermining Indigenous Rights:
Conflicts with Mining Companies in Canada and Guatemala

Tues Nov 2, 5:30pm
Carleton University – University Centre room 378
‘UC’ building: http://www2.carleton.ca/campus/

Throughout the colonial era and through to today, mining companies have enjoyed government sanctioned and un-fettered access to indigenous territories around the world. Canadian companies are currently at the fore of efforts to mine indigenous territories here in Canada and throughout the global south. This presentation will examine three examples of Canadian mining interests infringing on indigenous territories and how communities are reacting: the proposed mine in Tsilhqot’in Territory (Central BC) that would destroy Fish Lake; the Ring of Fire where despite their interest in potential mineral developments the rights of Cree communities are not being respected; and the Goldcorp mine in Guatemala where local communities have suffered water contamination and organized community referenda against mining in their communities.

Ramsey Hart is the Canada Program Coordinator for MiningWatch Canada. He works with mining-affected communities across Canada, participates in the environmental assessment of mining projects and works to reform outdated mining laws. http://www.miningwatch.ca/

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This event is part of Indigenous Sovereignty Week 2010 in Ottawa, Oct27-Nov4 – for full details please see www.bit.ly/iswottawa

Organized by: Defenders of the Land; Indigenous Environmental Network; Indigenous Peoples Solidarity Movement Ottawa (IPSMO); Bolivia Action Solidarity Network; MiningWatch; Project of Heart; Public Service Alliance of Canada

Sponsors: Canadian Union of Public Employees; Public Service Alliance of Canada; Canadian Union of Postal Workers; OPIRG/GRIPO-Ottawa; PSAC NCR Aboriginal Action Circle; PSAC National Women’s Department; CUPE Local 4600 (at Carleton University); Carleton University Graduate Students Association; PROMdemonium Fund; Canada Council for the Arts

Indigenous Sovereignty Week, Oct27-Nov4

Please join us as we celebrate the 2nd annual Indigenous Sovereignty Week in Ottawa, Oct27 – Nov4, 2010

The week is a part of a national grassroots initiative to build relationships and raise awareness about the issues and struggles of indigenous people that are often marginalized in Canadian society.

Full information is available on our ISW page, www.bit.ly/iswottawa
Or contact: ipsmo@riseup.net, 613-656-5498

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS:

Wednesday Oct 27, 7:00pm
Film – Schooling the World: The White Man’s Last Burden
… at PSAC building JK Wylie boardoom, 233 Gilmour

Friday Oct 29, 7:00pm
Seeking Justice: A National Call for an Public Enquiry for the
Murdered and Missing Women

featuring speakers:
* Sharon McIvor, successful challenger of sex discrimination in the Indian Act
* Laurie Odjig, mother of Maisy (missing since Sept 2008)
* Yasmin Jiwani, Concordia University
… at Lamoureux Hall room 122, University of Ottawa

Saturday Oct 30, 9:00am-5:30pm
Indigenous Sovereignty Symposium
featuring: Clement Chartier, Clayton Thomas-Muller, Marcelo Saavedra-Vargas, Ben Powless, representatives from the Algonquins of Barriere Lake, Native Youth Sexual Health Network, National Association of Friendship Centres, and more…
* opening and closing ceremonies
* plenaries: Climate Justice, Defending the Land
* concurrent sessions: Indigenous Peoples Space, Working as an Ally, Indigenous Sovereignty in an Urban Context, Reclaiming Indigenous Youth Self-Determination, Land Conservation and Indigenous Sovereignty
… at Lamoureux Hall (1st floor), University of Ottawa

Tuesday Nov 2, 5:30pm
Undermining Indigenous Rights: Conflicts with Mining Companies in Canada and Guatemala
with Ramsey Hart of MiningWatch
… University Centre room 378,  Carleton University

Wednesday Nov 3, 11:30am-2:00pm
The Oka Crisis – 20 Years Later: Is Reconciliation Possible?
featuring speakers: (note this is a bilingual event)
* Ellen Gabriel, Présidente, Femmes autochtones du Québec
* Francine Lemay, Traductrice agréée, “À l’orée des bois” | “At the Wood’s Edge”
* Pierre Trudel, Chercheur, Peuples autochtones et gouvernance, CRDP Université de Montréal\CEGEP Vieux-Montréal
* Jessica Yee, Chair, National Aboriginal Youth Council, Canadian Aboriginal AIDS Network
… at Desmarais Building room 3120, University of Ottawa
presented by Forum for Aboriginal Studies and Research at University of Ottawa

Wednesday Nov 3, 7:00pm
Film – Reel Injun: On the Trail of the Hollywood Indian
English with French subtitles
Followed by discussion with filmmaker Neil Diamond
… at Canadian Museum of Civilization, 100 Laurier Street, Gatineau
presented by the National Film Board in collaboration with Canadian Museum of Civilization

Thursday Nov 4, 7:00pm
Film – A Windigo Tale
Ottawa premiere, with director Armand Garnet Ruffo in attendance
… at National Library and Archives auditorium, 395 Wellington St

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Full information at www.bit.ly/iswottawa

Celebrate the Arrival of MARCHE AMUN / AMUN MARCH

Update: check the link here - http://picasaweb.google.com/peiju.wang/MarcheAMUNByNikGehl# to see photos from the feast and rally by Nik Gehl

On June 1, 2010, after nearly one month of walking, the AMUN March will arrive on Parliament Hill to draw attention to ongoing legislative sexism in the Indian Act, and to call people of conscience to join the struggle against it.

AMUN March kicked off its 500 km march from Wendake, QC to the Parliament Hill in Ottawa on May 4, 2010 to pursue the fight that was undertaken by Sharon McIvor (see Sharon McIvor’s fight for gender equality in the Indian Act), and to request that the Canadian Government resolve the injustices created by the Indian Act.  The Government of Canada introduced Bill C-3 to bolster gender equity in the registration provisions of the Act.  However, this Bill is just another continued failed remedial legislation, it partially corrects discriminatory aspects of the Indian Act registration rules (See Sexist Bill C-3 is racist and fatally flawed).

Furthermore, the government of Canada failed to consult with Indigenous Peoples and accommodate their concerns prior to introducing Bill C-3, which violates Section 35 of Canadian Constitution Act of 1982.  Not only Bill C-3 does not end discrimination against Indigenous women and their descendants, it also does not address the underlying issue of the Indian Act – categorization of Indian status.  If Canada is SINCERE in its promise of reconciliation with Indigenous peoples following the Apology of June 11 2008 and in the recent Throne speech, Canada must recognize and respect the INHERENT RIGHT of Indigenous peoples to govern themselves, to define who can be a citizen of their nation.

Indigenous Peoples Solidarity Movement Ottawa is one of many groups, including the Native Women’s Association of Canada, and Québec Native Women Inc., calling allies to come out and greet the march as it arrives on Parliament Hill.

Community Feast to Welcome AMUN March

L to R: Vivane Michele, Danielle Guay, Sharon McIvor, and Michèle Audette with her son Yocoisse Sioui. Photographer Gwen Brodsky

6 PM Monday, May 31, 2010
Odawa Friendship Centre, 12 Stirling Ave.  Ottawa, Algonquin Territory
Everyone is Welcome to the fest!

Opening ceremony by Elder Annie St. Georges

Speakers:
Michèle Audette and Viviane Michel, Marche Amun Organizers,
Sharon McIvor,
Jeanette Corbiere Lavell, and
Lynn Gehl, Giizhigaate-Mnidoo-Kwe, Makinag Ndoo-dem

Rally & Press Conference

Tuesday, June 1, 2010

11:45 AM   Victoria Island
(end of Middle Street, off Chaudière Bridge, follow signs for “Aboriginal Experiences”)
EVERYONE IS WELCOME

12 PM    Welcome
Jeanette Corbiere Lavell, President of the Native Women’s Association of Canada
Michèle Audette and Viviane Michel, Marche Amun Organizers
Sharon McIvor, McIvor v. Canada
Dawn Harvard, President of the Ontario Native Women’s Association
Kathleen McHugh, Women’s Council Chair of the Assembly of First Nations

12:45    Closing

1-1:30 PM    Press Conference (Charles Lynch Room, 130S, Centre Block) ALL MEDIA WELCOME

Further Information

What to do:

Write to you MP and the key politicians below about your opposition to Bill C-3:

Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development, Chuck Strahl;
Opposition party leaders: Duceppe, Ignatieff and Layton;
Members of the Standing Committee on Aboriginal Affairs: Bruce Stanton, Rick Clarke, LaVar Payne, John Duncan, Earl Dreeshen, Greg RickfordAnita Neville, Todd Russell, Larry Bagnell (Liberals); Jean Crowder, Carol Hughes (NDP); Marc LeMay and Yvon Levesque (BQ).

BACKGROUND

The Federal Government had until April 6th, 2010 to amend the Indian Act, but requested the Court of Appeal of British Columbia an extension till July 5th, 2010. It must act. The Indian Act discriminates and marginalizes the Native Peoples since 1876. Ms Sharon McIvor, a Native woman from British Columbia, questioned in Court one of the discriminatory outcomes of this Act, that is the impossibility for a Mother to hand down the Native status to her grand-children when the father of the children is not Native, when this right is recognized for Native fathers in the same situation. It is thanks to 25 years of legal procedures that things will change.

However, the women will go on being subjected to discrimination in such domains as:

  • The Right to Indian status for themselves and their children (abolish categories)
  • The Right of Membership to the Band for themselves and their children;
  • Registration of children whose paternity is questioned or not recognized;
  • The Right to live in the reserve for themselves, their spouse and their children;
  • The clause on distribution of lands and services on the reserve;
  • Property division following a breach/break-up in the relationship;
  • The Right of Ottawa to determine who is Native

Through history, discrimination founded on sex towards women of First Nations becomes official as soon as 1868, legislative measures then enacting that the Indian status could be handed down only by men. A man who married a non-Native kept his Indian status conferred by the Indian Act, his wife and their children became Indians according to the Law. A woman from a First Nation who married a non-Native or a non-registered Indian lost her aboriginal and treaty rights, as did her children. In the Indian Act jargon, she lost her status.

It is to continue the struggle undertaken by Ms McIvor and request the Canadian Government to settle these injustices of the Indian Act that the AMUN March is held.

Francais

Le gouvernement fédéral avait jusqu’au 6 avril 2010 pour modifier la Loi sur les Indiens, mais a demandé une extension jusqu’au 5 juillet 2010 à la Cour d’appel de Colombie- Britannique. Il doit agir. La Loi sur les Indiens discrimine et marginalise les peuples autochtones depuis 1876. C’est ce qu’a décidé la Cour dans la cause de Mme Sharon McIvor, femme autochtone de la Colombie-Britannique qui a contesté l’un des effets discriminatoires de cette loi, soit l’impossibilité pour une mère de transmettre le statut autochtone à ses petits-enfants lorsque le père des enfants n’est pas autochtone, alors que ce droit est reconnu pour les pères autochtones dans la même situation. C’est grâce à plus de 25 ans de démarches légales que les choses vont changer.

Toutefois, les femmes continuent de subir la discrimination de la Loi sur les Indiens dans les domaines tels que:

  • Le droit au statut indien pour elles-mêmes et leurs enfants (abolition des catégories);
  • Le droit à l’appartenance à la bande pour elles-mêmes et leurs enfants;
  • L’inscription d’enfants dont la paternité est contestée ou non reconnue;
  • Le droit à résider dans la réserve pour elles-mêmes, leur conjoint et leurs enfants;
  • La clause de distribution de terrains et de services dans la réserve;
  • Le partage des biens suite à la rupture de la relation,
  • Le refus d’ajouter des nouveaux argents pour les nouvelles inscriptions,
  • Le droit exclusif d’Ottawa de déterminer qui est indien.

Dans l’histoire, la discrimination fondée sur le sexe à l’égard des femmes des Premières Nations devient officielle dès 1868, des mesures législatives décrétant alors que le statut d’Indien ne pouvait être transmis que par les hommes. Un homme qui mariait une nonautochtone conservait son statut d’indien conféré par la Loi sur les Indiens, sa femme et leurs enfants devenaient indiens au sens de la Loi. Une femme des PN qui mariait un non-autochtone ou un Indien non-inscrit perdait ses droits ancestraux et issus de traités, tout comme ses enfants! Dans le jargon de la Loi sur les Indiens, elle perdait son statut.

C’est pour continuer la lutte entreprise par Mme McIvor et demander au gouvernement canadien de régler ces injustices dans la Loi sur les Indiens que la Marche Amun aura lieu.

Update re:Peru situation

NEW!

AND – NEW NOTICE – Protest at Peruvian Embassy, 130 Albert St, on THURSDAY JUNE 18 beginning at 11:30 – see you there!

PLUS – contact Canadian senators and urge them to block Bill C-24, the law to implement Canada-Peru Free Trade Agreement:  http://www.canadians.org/action/2009/11-June-09.html

Canadian actions:

OTTAWA: Demonstration and information picket
Thursday June 11 11:30-1:30
In front of Peruvian Embassy
130 Albert between O´Connor and Metcalfe
ipsmo@riseup.nethttps://ipsmo.wordpress.com
Note: Organizations endorsing the four demands on the Peruvian government include: Common Cause Ottawa; Common Frontiers; Council of Canadians; MiningWatch Canada; OPIRG/GRIPO-Ottawa; Ottawa-Outaouais Industrial Workers of the World (IWW); Rights Action; Students Against Israeli Apartheid -Carleton (SAIA); and Indigenous Peoples Solidarity Movement -Ottawa.

TORONTO Protest activity
Thursday, June 11, 1pm
Consulate of Peru, Toronto
10 St. Mary’s St. (just south of Bloor St. at Yonge)
More info: Carlos Torchia, Coordinator, Latin American Solidarity Network-Toronto, torontoboliviasolidarity@gmail.com

MONTREAL: Demonstration for Life in Bagua
Friday, June 12
12:00 Noon / à midi
Peruvian Consulate
550 Sherbrooke West,
Metro McGill
Organized by: Action Créative, Société Bolivarienne du Québec, Hands Off Venezuela et Mohawk Traditional Council of Kahnawake

PETITIONS:
http://www.avaaz.org/en/peru_stop_violence/?cl=250248179&v=3461
http://www.ipetitions.com/petition/Amazon/index.html

FACEBOOK GROUP: Solidarity With Peru
http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=89605273186

ARTICLES/WEBSITES:
* Reports by Ben Powless, IPSMO member currently in Peru
http://rabble.ca/taxonomy/term/2686
* In depth analysis of the situation, by Gerardo Rénique:
https://nacla.org/node/5879
* News from AmazonWatch.org – includes action items
http://www.amazonwatch.org/peru-protests.php
MESSAGE FROM BOB LOVELACE:

Another Day in the – Life of Peru and Canada
June 10th

While in the Amazon region of Ecuador a few weeks ago I wrote to a friend, “At least now I can say that I have seen the Garden of Eden”. My worst fear, the gnawing secret I would not have dared to breathe, was that the beautiful courageous people that we met and shared stories with would one day be murdered for their land and the hidden metals of which they had no need of themselves. Just over the hills was Peru. As I looked south I had wondered who lived there. Now I know.

In the last six days we have learned who lives there. Mostly they are indigenous people whose genes have flowed through the region as long as the rivers have. They are not poor, because they are at home, because they are among their families and clans, because they walk in the footsteps of their ancestors, because the land that has sustained hundreds of generations will continue to care for them. They are frightened now. Six days ago they were worried that their land would be destroyed; now they fear that everything will perish. They are courageous. They do not hide when the helicopters fly over. They watch them come and go. And they will watch them go, watch them go.

Tomorrow will be the seventh day. Tomorrow, Thursday June 11th, our job is to make the world aware of what has happened in Peru. In Ottawa, we will be at the Peruvian Embassy. In Toronto, we will be at the Peruvian Consulate. Where ever you are tomorrow you must make your voice heard. Call your local Canadian Bank and tell them to stop investing in extractive industries, mining, drilling, forestry and agri-business that are overlooking or participating in human rights abuses. Call your local MP and MPP and tell them that you are tired of them selling your soul for an economy that places so little value on human life. Call your neighbour and ask them to join you in denouncing the media for keeping you ignorant of the truth that Canada is complicit, as a free trade partner, in the murder of people this week in Peru.

You see, we can do something. We may not be on the frontline but we can make a difference. We can save lives by making our names, faces and attitudes known. If you have a camera, take pictures at a demonstration, of yourself and friends holding signs, of sidewalk chalk messages that you write on Bay Street, use your imagination and then post those pictures on the web where people in Peru can see them. Tell them with pictures that they are not alone. And then send those pictures to the politicians and to the mining companies and to the Banks, to the US Embassy, the Peruvian Embassy, so that they will know that our brothers and sisters in Peru are not alone. You are not alone.

We can also share our wealth or a portion of our poverty with indigenous people in Peru. They can use it right now.

I have spoken with Grahame Russell of Rights Action (Canada). Rights Action is an NGO that works primarily in Central America with communities opposing mining and resource extraction. Grahame has agreed that 100% of the donations that are made to Rights Action in the name of “current conflict in Peru” will go directly to indigenous peoples’ organizations in the affected area. I will work with my contacts in Ecuador and Peru to direct the money where it will do the most good. Please encourage people on your e-lists to give something to support healing for people in Peru. And please give something yourself.

TO MAKE TAX-DEDUCTIBLE DONATIONS for indigenous organizations in Peru resisting the harms of large-scale “development” projects (mining, tourism, hydro-electric dams) and promoting their own development, human rights and environment projects, make check payable to “Rights Action” and mail to:

* CANADA: 552 – 351 Queen St. E, Toronto ON, M5A-1T8
* UNITED STATES: Box 50887, Washington DC, 20091-0887

CREDIT-CARD DONATIONS: http://rightsaction.org/contributions.htm

NB – Write “Peru–Indigenous Rights” on the cheque’s memo line, or in the appropriate field of the on-line credit card donations. This will ensure that every dollar you donate will go directly to the people it is intended to help.

Questions? Contact Grahame Russell, director, info@rightsaction.org, 1-860-751-4285

The Ben Powless Interview on CBC, “The Current” has been switched to Friday morning. Get in and listen because Ben is now at Pagua, Peru conducting interviews and helping search for evidence.

Support those demonstrations tomorrow. I will see you there!

Please forward this email to all of your e-lists. Since mainstream media is playing this down or not even present we need to be the news.

Migwetch,
In peace and Friendship,

Robert Lovelace