VIDEO: Andrea Smith at Women’s Worlds 2011

Speaking on the ‘Breaking Cycles’ plenary at the international conference in Ottawa, unceded Algonquin territory, in July 2011.

From the Women’s Worlds 2011 program: “PROVOKER: A feminist thinker and anti-violence activist from the Cherokee nation, Andrea has garnered international respect for her advocacy on violence against women of colour specifically Native American women. Co-founder of “INCITE! Women of Color Against Violence”, Andrea currently teaches in the Department of Media and Cultural Studies at the University of California, Riverside. Prior to that, she was assistant professor of American Culture and Women’s Studies at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.”

 

 

Women’s Worlds 2011 was a five-day international women’s congress, consisting of 4 plenaries and approximately 300 sessions and other events. Over 2,000 women from around the world were in attendance, and 2011 marked the 30th anniversary of the first Women’s Worlds gathering.

The Breaking Cycles plenary consisted of Andrea Smith, Devaki Jain, Tanya Tagaq and moderator Joanne St. Lewis. See the full video of the plenary: http://vimeo.com/25984077

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Event: Indigenous People and Resistance to Police Violence and Prisons

Indigenous Women, Two-Spirited People and Resistance to Police Violence and Prison

Monday, Sept. 26 at 7pm
Somerset West Community Health Centre

55 Eccles St.

Facebook event page: https://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=217053778350444

Speakers:

Tania Dopler, Ontario Aboriginal HIV/AIDS Strategy
Kim Pate, Executive Director of the Canadian Association of Elizabeth Fry Societies
Other Speakers TBC.

This event will focus on the violence experienced by indigenous women and two-spirited people by the police and prisons, their resistance to this violence and alternatives to both the police and prisons.

“Aboriginal women are over‐represented in the federal correctional system, representing only 2% of women in Canada and 29% of women in federal prisons in July, 2003. In July, 2003, 60% of Aboriginal women serving federal sentences were in prison.”

“Native peoples’ experiences are often completely erased from mainstream discussions of law enforcement violence. Yet, since the arrival of the first colonists on this continent, Native women and Native Two Spirit, transgender and gender nonconforming people have been subjected to untold violence at the hands of U.S. military forces, as well as local, state and federal law enforcement. Movement of Native peoples across borders with Canada and Mexico has been severely restricted, often by force, separating families and communities. Integral to the imposition of colonial society and enforced assimilation, the notion of “policing” was forced on sovereign nations and cultures that had previously resolved disputes within communities.”

“Developing community-based responses to violence is one critical option. Community accountability is a community-based strategy, rather than a police/prison-based strategy, to address violence within our communities. Community accountability is a process in which a community – a group of friends, a family, a church, a workplace, an apartment complex, a neighborhood, etc – work together to do the following things:

  • Create and affirm VALUES & PRACTICES that resist abuse and oppression and encourage safety, support, and accountability
  • Develop sustainable strategies to ADDRESS COMMUNITY MEMBERS’ ABUSIVE BEHAVIOR, creating a process for them to account for their actions and transform their behavior
  • Commit to ongoing development of all members of the community, and the community itself, to TRANSFORM THE POLITICAL CONDITIONS that reinforce oppression and violence
  • Provide SAFETY & SUPPORT to community members who are violently targeted that RESPECTS THEIR SELF-DETERMINATION”

Sources:

http://www.elizabethfry.ca/eweek06/pdf/aborig.pdf
http://www.incite-national.org/media/docs/5676_toolkitrev-native.pdf
http://www.incite-national.org/index.php?s=114

March 3 – Decolonizing Social Justice: The Anti-Violence Movement and the Non-Profit Industrial Complex

Decolonizing Social Justice:
The Anti-Violence Movement and the Non-Profit Industrial Complex

The Institute of Women’s Studies of the University of Ottawa is pleased invite you to the Shirley Greenberg Annual Lecture in Women’s Studies entitled “Decolonizing Social Justice: The Anti-Violence Movement and the Non-Profit Industrial Complex” given by Andrea Smith, Assistant Professor, Department of Media and Cultural Studies, University of California, Riverside Co-founder of INCITE! Women of Color against Violence and The Boarding School Healing Project.

Wednesday, March 3, 2010 at 5:30 p.m.
Alumni Auditorium, 85 University Private, University of Ottawa
FREE ADMISSION
Info: womenst@uOttawa.ca or Kathryn.Trevenen@uOttawa.ca

BIO

Andrea Smith is a co-founder of INCITE! Women of Color against Violence and the Boarding School Healing Project. She is the author of Conquest: Sexual Violence and American Indian Genocide and Native Americans and the Christian Right: The Gendered Politics of Unlikely Alliances. She is also editor of The Revolution will not be funded: Beyond the Non-profit Industrial Complex and The Color of Violence. She currently teaches at the University of California, Riverside.

********** Articles related to violence against women **********

Montreal’s 1st Annual Memorial March for Missing and Murdered Women
http://www.missingjustice.ca/2010/02/montreals-1st-annumal-memorial-march-for-missing-and-murdered-women/

Eagles soar above Vancouver march for murdered and missing women
By Carlito Pablo
Publish Date: February 14, 2010
Source: http://www.straight.com/article-289757/vancouver/eagles-soar-above-vancouver-march-murdered-and-missing-women

In Our Own Words
Women living in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside weigh in on the Olympics
By by Stella August and Phillipa Ryan
February 14, 2010
Source: http://www.dominionpaper.ca/articles/2917

An Olympics Failure:
At lease 137 Native Women Missing and Murdered in BC since 1980
by Maya Rolbin-Ghanie
February 12, 2010
Source: http://www.dominionpaper.ca/articles/2982

Missing women’s initiative in limbo as memorial marches approach
By Mia Rabson, Winnipeg Free PressFebruary 13, 2010
Source: http://www.vancouversun.com/news/Missing+women+initiative+limbo+memorial+marches+approach+words+with+optional+trim+words+OTTA/2559398/story.html

All Eyes on Us: Revealing Over 500 Missing/Murdered Indigenous Women in Canada

All Eyes on Us!
Capitalizing on the 2010 Olympics to Call International Attention to
the 500+ Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women
By Carmen Teeple Hopkins
January 18, 2010
Source: http://no2010.com/node/1269

********** Action Alert **********

Please take FIVE MINUTES to ask that our elected officials take action to end the violence against missing and murdered Indigenous women in Canada.

Indigenous women living in Canada are five times more at risk of dying a violent death than other women, according to a Canadian government statistic. A study by the Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC) concluded that 521 indigenous girls and women have gone missing or been murdered since 1980, and calls for an emergency strategy. Some activists believe the number of missing to be much higher, as many cases go unreported, often due to distrust between First Nations communities and police.

Amnesty International issued a comprehensive report in 2004 entitled “Stolen Sisters: A Human Rights Response to discrimination and violence against Indigenous women in Canada,” and the UN recently called on the Canadian government to investigate why hundreds of deaths and disappearances of Indigenous women remain unsolved.

Please ask that our elected representatives do something about this important issue:

SENT AN QUICK MESSAGE FROM THE WEBSITE OF THE JUSTICE FOR MISSING AND MURDERED INDIGENOUS WOMEN CAMPAIGN: http://www.missingjustice.ca/voiceyourconcern