Apr 22: Celebrating the Defence of Mother Earth – A Fundraiser for the Six Nations Land Defenders Legal Defence Fund

Movies, Speakers, Music and Free Food!

Image credit: Jesse Purcell with the Just Seeds collective
Image credit: Jesse Purcell with the Just Seeds collective

Monday, April 22, 6:00 to Midnight
Rideau Curling Club, 715 Cooper Street, Ottawa

Facebook event link

Free – suggested donation $10 – $20
Wheelchair Accessible
Contact us about ASL/LSQ: ipsmo@riseup.net

Food will be provided by Food Not Bombs Ottawa, and there is a bar in the Curling Club

 

The IPSM is organizing a fundraiser for front-line land defenders from Six Nations this Earth Day!

All of the money raised will be going directly to the Six Nations Land Defenders Legal Defence Fund.

 

The night will feature short movies, speakers and live music!

Short films:

  • Day Zero, about the Six Nations Land Reclamation
  • Rough Cut: Toad: Onkwehonwe Land Defender
  • the National Film Board film, Six Miles Deep (subtitled)

Speakers:

  • Francine “Flower” Doxtator
  • Tom Keefer

Live music:

  • True Rez, award winning hip-hop artists from Six Nations
  • Balam Santos

 
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In 2006, activists from Six Nations reclaimed a part of their territory, “Kanonhstaton” that was going to be developed by several construction companies who had, illegally, invested in Douglas Creek Estates. For most of the summer of 2006, the land reclamation was highly publicized. Since then, although it has not generated the same media attention, Haudenosaunee activists have continued to fight to protect their lands and waters. Due to this fight, the last six years have seen harsh criminalization of Haudenosaunee Land Defenders. Dozens of people have faced criminal charges and several have served substantial time in jail. In Brantford, an injunction was passed making it illegal for anyone from Six Nations to be involved in land claims protest within the city.

Several Six Nations activists have also been arrested and charged of serious criminal offences due to the actions of Gary McHale, a racist right-wing demagogue with ties to overt white supremacists. On February 18th several Six Nations land defenders were arrested for allegedly “obstructing” and “assaulting” OPP officers. That day anti-native rights activist, Gary McHale, marched onto Kanonstaton and succeeded yet again in instigating conflict by unexpectedly marching towards the house at Kanonhstaton and disturbing the Haudenosaunee people living there. Later, on April 28th, the police claimed that by being at Kanonhstaton on April 28th, Flower had breached conditions stemming from the charges on February 18th.

We must continue to build support for Six Nations land defenders and resist the actions of the colonial courts in criminalizing Six Nations land defenders. Flower is still not legally allowed to return to Kanonhstaton and in order to avoid jail she had to agree to live with her surety in Toronto – away from her home, her community and friends, her daughter, and her four grandchildren. All of us living on this land are treaty people, and we as treaty people must overcome such outrageous and heartbreaking violations of treaty and human rights by building support for our friends and allies at Six Nations.

In terms of a legal strategy, money is still urgently needed.

The April 28th Coalition is asking for your help to support Flower in a number of ways:

  • Pass a motion within your union or political organization denouncing this political repression of indigenous land rights activists.
  • Invite Flower and other members of the April 28th Coalition to come and speak to your group about her case and the larger issues of Six Nations land rights and activism in support of treaty rights.
  • Raise money to help cover the legal costs of appealing the court’s decision to ban Flower from Kanonhstaton.
  • Send money to help Flower cover the cost of replacing the glasses the police broke while arresting her and to aid with her living costs while she is in Toronto.
  • Come to Flower’s next court appearance at 2pm on June 26th in Cayuga, Ontario.
  • Get involved in the April 28th Coalition.

Email april28info@gmail.com to get in touch with us and tell us how you can help with any of these matters. Cheques can be made payable to “First Nations Solidarity Working Group” and mailed c/o Laura Lepper to 193 Tansley Rd., Thornhill, ON, L4J 2Y8. You can also donate money via credit card or paypal by clicking on the “donate” button at the http://www.april28.net/ website.

For more information about the legal defence fund: http://april28coalition.wordpress.com/2012/05/31/support-flower-stop-the-criminalization-of-six-nations-land-defenders/

For a preview of Six Miles Deep: http://www.nfb.ca/film/six_miles_deep/clip/six_miles_deep_clip_1

 

Journey of Nishiyuu – Youth walker/warriors arrive in Ottawa

Click photo for album of photos taken by Ben Powless.

 

Indigenous youth trekking to Ottawa from northern Quebec arrived by the hundreds on Monday, March 25. In mid January, six Cree youth from Whapmagoostui began a 1,600 kilometre “Quest of Wisjinichu-Nishiyuu”, a “Quest for Unity” as part of the burgeoning Idle No More movement. (read full article by Andy Crosby posted on ottawa.mediacoop.ca)

 

Check the official Journey of Nishiyuu website

 

Video of the final leg of the journey (7min)
(ends with speech by David Kawapit on Parliament Hill):

Indigenous Solidarity for Settlers workshops March 19 & 21

Indigenous Solidarity for Settlers

 

Tuesday, March 19 at 6:00pm
University of Ottawa, Jock Turcott University Centre (UCU) room 207 (facebook event)

or

Thursday, March 21 at 6:00pm
McNabb Community Centre, 180 Percy St. (facebook event)

 

Free
Wheelchair Accessible
Contact us in advance regarding ASL
ipsmo@riseup.net – www.ipsmo.org

 

482692_10200650314321052_824841453_n[1]Matt (the facilitator for this workshop) is a white male, a survivor of childhood abuse and police violence, who has lived most of his adult life in poverty.

He has been engaged in indigenous solidarity activism for the past six years, primarily with the Indigenous Peoples` Solidarity Movement of Ottawa (IPSMO) and is also a part of Books to Prisoners Ottawa.

 

The goal of the workshop is to educate non-indigenous people about the importance of indigenous solidarity, to teach people and learn from them about what solidarity means and how to do it, and to work on our decolonial analyses.

1) Case study

Using a popular education exercise that is based in the experiences of the Lubicon Cree we explore what colonization is and, to some extent, how it feels.

2) What is solidarity?

We focus on what solidarity is and how to “do it”. The word solidarity is used a lot, especially in radical organizing, but it is not always easy to define or to do. Put simply we believe that it is essential in solidarity work to “listen, take direction and stick around”.

3) Looking at colonization from an anti-oppressive framework

This part of the workshop focuses on building a theoretical understanding of colonization and oppression. It is based on Andrea Smith’s analysis of the role that Heteropatriarchy and White Supremacy play in colonization, and also examines how colonization has been, and continues to be, imposed through individual, institutional and cultural oppression.Orientation for the IPSM Ottawa

“We are part of a mass movement now”: Algonquins of Barriere Lake Traffic Slowdown on Highway 117 – Jan 16

As part of Idle No More movement, Algonquins of Barriere Lake slow down traffic on Highway 117

Kitganik / Rapid Lake – January 16, 2013

Barriere Lake youth with Banner in Ottawa January 11th, 2013.
Barriere Lake youth with banner in Ottawa January 11th, 2013.

The Algonquins of Barriere Lake will be slowing down traffic on Highway 117 today to draw attention to forestry operations that they oppose on their lands. Joining the chorus of First Nations across the country who are demanding the government honour their agreements with Indigenous peoples, and consult with them on development affecting their lands, Barriere Lake is demanding the implementation of a resource co-management agreement signed in 1991 with Canada and Quebec that continues to be neglected.

Barriere Lake is taking action today to protect the land and watershed for their future generations and for the future of Canadians. Resolute Forestry Products has already clear-cut several ecological sensitive areas of Barriere Lake’s traditional, unceded territory, such as bear dens and moose yards, that the community is trying to protect.

Barriere Lake has never been idle. But today marks the first day of coordinated Indigenous action and unrest until First Nations’ demands in this country are finally met.

Media Contacts:
Norman Matchewan, band councilor: 819-441-8006

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Idle No More pamphlet

idllenomore_pamphletFor printing and distribution to help spread the message of #IdleNoMore

This is a 1-pg double-sided pamphlet (or french version or spanish version), in PDF format, that summarizes key points from the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples (RCAP). The pamphlet is entitled ‘Resetting and Restoring the Relationship between Indigenous Peoples and Canada‘ and is written by Taiaiake Alfred and Tobold Rollo (the original unformated version is here).

The pamphlet also includes graphics and links for the Idle No More movement.

Printing instructions:

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To follow Idle No More online: