July 23 – Decolonizing Together: Indigenous Walking Tour, Solidarity Assembly & Asinabka Festival Film Screening

UPDATE:

Media from the event:

Facebook pages:

 
—-
 
decolonizingtogetherDecolonizing Together:
Indigenous Walking Tour, Solidarity Assembly &
Asinabka Festival Film Screening

– Walking Tour with Jaime Koebel
– Opening by a local Elder
– Robert Lovelace will be speaking
– Movie Screening of Rhymes For Young Ghouls with Asinabka Film Festival
* Note Director Jeff Barnaby will be in attendance for a Q & A

============================================================================

Wednesday, July 23

Walking Tour Starts at 5:30pm
– meet at the Human Rights Monument, Elgin and Lisgar

Assembly begins at 7:15pm on Victoria Island

Movie starts at 8:45pm on Victoria Island

Free Food
Suggested Donation: $5 – $15
No one turned away for lack of money
Accessibility notes below

Contact Us:
asinabkafestival@gmail.com
www.asinabkafestival.org/
ipsmo@riseup.net
http://ipsmo.org

—————————————————————————-

Decolonizing Together is about listening to indigenous people, taking direction from them, sticking around in decolonizing movement, and discussing together what it means to be responsible allies to indigenous people and communities struggling for justice and decolonization.

We will start by learning from Jaime Koebel, a Metis artist and educator, about the often hidden indigenous history, art and culture in the city of Ottawa.

After we arrive at Victoria Island there will be an opening by a local Elder.

To open the solidarity assembly we will hear about the Algonquin history of the Ottawa River valley from Ardoch Algonquin elder and Queen’s University Professor, Robert Lovelace.  This will lead us into a collective discussion about what meaningful Indigenous Solidarity and Decolonization movement is, and how we can do it.

—————————————————————————-

Indigenous Walking Tour w/ Jaime Koebel: http://indigenouswalks.com/

“Indigenous Walks is an active, educational and fun way to learn about Indigenous Peoples’ experiences in Ottawa. This guided walk and talk provides a layer of knowledge of the Nation’s Capital through art, culture and history.”

Indigenous Solidarity Assembly w/ Robert Lovelace, Ardoch Algonquin Elder

We are honoured that Robert Lovelace will be with us to speak about the Algonquin history of the Ottawa valley.  The entire Ottawa river watershed is the traditional territory of the Algonquin people.  His words will begin a large group discussion on the nature of Indigenous Solidarity and Decolonization.

This small assembly is part of the lead up to the Peoples’ Social Forum happening from Aug. 21 – 24, and our plans to have an Indigenous Solidarity Movement Assembly during the forum.  It will involve a collective discussion about questions that are important to indigenous solidarity movement: What is Indigenous Solidarity and how do we do it effectively?  As settlers, what are our differing roles and responsibilities in decolonization movement?

Film Screening by Asinabka Film & Media Arts Festival
www.asinabkafestival.org

Rhymes for Young Ghouls (2013)
Director: Jeff Barnaby
Runtime: 88 min
Rating: 14A
Guided by the spirits of her departed mother and brother, an Aboriginal teenager plots revenge against a sadistic Indian Agent in this fiercely irreverent debut feature from Canadian director Jeff Barnaby.
Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=feWS9simNFI&feature=kp

*Note Director Jeff Barnaby will be in attendance for a Q & A

—————————————————————————-

Accessibility Notes:

– These events are wheelchair accessible: Victoria Island is listed as BASIC ACCESSIBILITY. The main area is grass covered, and the site has an accessibility ramp. There is an accessible toilet.  If you require assistance, our volunteers can help you.
– Childcare will be available
– Contact us if you require bus tickets
– The movie has closed captioning/subtitles in English
– We are trying to secure ASL interpretation, updates about ASL to come
– Do not wear colognes, perfumes or other scented products as some people have severe allergies

—————————————————————————-

This event was co-organized by the Asinabka Film Festival and the Indigenous Peoples’ Solidarity Movement – Ottawa (IPSMO) and our partners: KAIROS, MiningWatch, Justice For Deepan, Independent Jewish Voices, No One Is Illegal – Ottawa, and the Peoples’ Social Forum.

Our partners:

KAIROS: http://www.kairoscanada.org/
MiningWatch: http://www.miningwatch.ca/
Independent Jewish Voices: http://ijvcanada.org/
Justice For Deepan: http://www.justicefordeepan.org/
Peoples’ Social Forum: http://www.peoplessocialforum.org/
No One Is Illegal – Ottawa: http://noii-ottawa.blogspot.ca/
============================================================================

Asinabka Festival, July 23 – 29

The full schedule for this week long film festival will be available soon.

Currently in our 3rd year of programming, the mandate of the Asinabka Festival is to present an annual Indigenous film and media arts festival in the Nations Capital that allows independent artists – national, international, Indigenous, non-Indigenous – to share, present, and disseminate their work.

http://asinabkafestival.org

==============================================================================

The Solidarity Assembly and Asinabka Movie screening are happening on Victoria Island, in sight of the Chaudière falls.  The Chaudière falls are a deeply important cultural site for the Algonquin people.  They were negatively impacted by the Hydro Ring Dam that was built in 1908.  The current plans of Windmill Development Group to “develop” and gentrify the Domtar building currently on the Island is a step in the wrong direction. The Chaudière falls, like the whole Ottawa river watershed, are stolen Algonquin territory.  Both the natural beauty and the cultural significance are already marred by the Ring Dam and this will only be worsened by increased “development” on the Island.

Free The Chaudière Falls:

Before they were harnessed for industry, the Chaudière Falls were second only to Niagara, and many people considered them more interesting in their variety and setting. The main feature was the Big Kettle, where the waterfall came into almost a full circle. It’s a greater arc than Niagara’s Horseshoe Falls. Over millennia, the flow had worn the stone at the base into a great bowl. The water would swirl around and bubble up, and there would always be a mist. On a bright summer day, there would be at least one rainbow in it. Further towards the Quebec side was the Lost Chaudière, where the area was completely surrounded by stone. Much to the amazement of visitors, the water would flow in but wouldn’t come out again: It was travelling through an underground channel, reappearing further down the river.

Regarding William Commanda’s Legacy Vision for the Sacred Chaudiere Site:
https://ipsmo.wordpress.com/2014/06/22/william-commandas-vision-chaudiere/

Let the Chaudière fall – freely:
http://www.ottawacitizen.com/Chaudi%C3%A8re+fall+freely/9778425/story.html

Free The Falls by Albert Dumont:
http://albertdumont.com/free-the-falls/

—-

Advertisements

“Honour Your Word”

 
honour your word posterThoughts from Albert “South Wind” Dumont, who attended our Earth Day screening of Honour Your Word, the new documentary about the Algonquins of Barriere Lake:

 

The documentary “Honour Your Word” to me, is a call for Canada’s citizens to go on the march in defence of the sacredness Canadians claim to place on the threads which connect the hearts and souls of all the good people who populate this great land. Watch the film and if, after doing so, you are not motivated to help make things right in La Verendrye Park where justice has been drawn, quartered and burned at the stake, then you are as spiritless as the perpetrators of the human rights violations taking place there today. The Algonquins of Barriere Lake are standing alone against tyranny and oppression. They are a brave resourceful people living in Third World poverty whose plight is documented in a film produced and directed by Martha Stiegman.

Where is the mirror that would show Canadians what really is looking back at them when they peer into it? It does exist, but most of us (Canadians) will have to wait until death carries them to a new world to see it. The ugliness of their ways will be revealed and an accounting of some kind will surely come to pass at that time.

We, the First Peoples, live in a world where only the human rights violations directly impacting settlers or injustices being perpetrated against people in far off countries like China or the Middle East are worthy of Canadians’ support and sympathy. When human rights violations are occurring against the Aboriginal People of this land, Canadians turn a blind eye and a deaf ear to it. Canadians need to ask themselves why this is so. To me, the answer begins and ends with ‘greed’.

“Honour”, the real definition of that word does not exist in our Parliaments only because Canadians do not demand it as a trait alive and strong, in the men and women we send to the Red Chamber to represent us before the world and before God. We must ask ourselves how our children and their children will be impacted by our negligence of duty to them when we do such a thing. Surely we doom them (our children) to a world where dog eats dog, where the weak are spat upon and where peaceful protest is laughed at and ignored.

The film is interesting throughout but several powerful scenes stand out to me as highlights. One scene is particularly moving, it shows a young Barriere Lake Algonquin man standing before the camera telling about what is being lost of his beloved land when clear-cutting occurs. His words are strong and heartfelt, he is overcome with emotion and though weeping almost uncontrollably, he finishes his statement. I wept with him while sitting in the darkness of the theatre and cannot banish the scene from my mind. It will be my inspiration and motivation to get involved and help with this cause in whatever way the Algonquins ask of me.

One thing the film makes clear to me at least, is that the peaceful protest of the Algonquins up to this point, is nothing more than an exercise in pointless frustration. They protest peacefully to protect the trees and their way of life. Their leaders are thrown in jail when they do so. “Next time you will not be jailed for short periods of time but for years,” they are warned by the courts. Knowledge of such injustices and oppression makes my heart sick.

What is happening in La Verendrye Park is proof positive of just how racist a country Canada is. Only a people who are capable of raw, unadulterated hatred against a segment of the community not their own would allow what is happening to the Algonquins of Barriere Lake to occur in a country like Canada. God help us.

Keep the Circle Strong,
South Wind.

 

Albert Dumont, “South Wind”, is a Poet, Storyteller, Speaker, and an Algonquin Traditional Teacher. He was born and raised in traditional Algonquin territory (Kitigan Zibi). He has been walking the “Red Road” since commencing his sobriety in 1988. He has published four books of poetry and short stories and one children’s book, written in three languages. His website is www.albertdumont.com

—-
 

More on the film and the struggle of the Algonquins of Barriere Lake:

 

Action items:

HYW-poster-jpg
 
Resources for Barriere Lake:

 

More about the film:


 

 

 

April 22 – HONOUR YOUR WORD: Celebrating the Defense of Mother Earth!

 

Click image to print poster
Click image to print poster
Movie Screening and Fund Raiser for the Algonquins of Barriere Lake

With special guests: Barriere Lake community members including Norm Matchewan and Elder Michel Thusky, and (via Skype) filmmaker Martha Stiegman

Tuesday, April 22 at 6:30pm (doors 6pm)
at the Mayfair Theatre
1074 Bank St. (near Sunnyside)
Buses # 1 & 7 (Bank) or # 5 (Riverdale)

$5-15 suggested donation
(no one turned away for lack of funds)
Fundraiser for Barriere Lake: Click to donate

 

Honour Your Word is a new documentary film – an intimate portrait of life behind the barricades for the Algonquins of Barriere Lake, an inspiring First Nation whose dignity and courage contrast sharply with the political injustice they face.
 

Presented in Ottawa by the Indigenous Peoples Solidarity Movement Ottawa, with Diffusion Multi-Monde and co-sponsors MiningWatch Canada, OPIRG-Carleton, OPIRG/GRIPO-Ottawa and OSSTF District-25 Human Rights / Status of Women Committee.

 

Honour Your Word – trailer
 

 

9-minute interview with filmmaker Martha Stiegman, from CHUO 89.1FM radio show Click Here with host Mitchell Caplan:
 

 

Accessibility Notes:

  • The Mayfair Theatre has side entrances that are wheelchair accessible.
    The washrooms are not, but Shoppers Drug Mart (located next door) does have accessible washrooms.
  • Please refrain from wearing perfumes, colognes or other scented products
  • Please contact us if you require ASL/LSQ
  • Please contact us if you require bus tickets

Contact: ipsmo@riseup.net – www.ipsmo.org
 

Please help us promote this event!

 
——-

Celebrating the Defense of Mother Earth!

This movie screening of Honour Your Word is the IPSM Ottawa’s 3rd “Earth Day” event Celebrating the Defense of Mother Earth!

Last year we were honoured to work with Defenders of the Land and Land Defenders from Six Nations and we raised $1405 for the legal defense of activists from Six Nations, and in 2009 we organized our 1st event with Minwaashin Lodge, the Tungasuvvingat Inuit, and others.

——-
 

More about the movie – Honour Your Word (2013, 59min):

New Algonquin leaders are followed as their community fights to protect their land, their way of life and their language.

The title refers to the Algonquins of Barriere Lake’s campaign slogan demanding Canada and Quebec honour a precedent-setting conservation deal signed in 1991. Director Martha Stiegman spent four years shooting this poetic, heartfelt documentary that challenges stereotypes of “angry Indians.” Honour Your Word juxtaposes starkly contrasting landscapes—the majesty of the bush, a dramatic highway stand-off against a riot squad, daily life within the confines of the reserve—to reveal the spirit of a people for whom blockading has become a part of their way of life, a life rooted in the forest they are defending.

For more information:

 
 

Algonquins of Barriere Lake: New film and thesis project now out

 
A new film, Honour Your Word, and a 305-pg thesis document, highlight the ongoing efforts of the Algonuins of Barriere Lake community.

—-

On Jurisdiction and Settler Colonialism:
The Algonquins of Barriere Lake Against the Federal Land Claims Policy

In September, Barriere Lake Solidarity activist and PhD candidate Shiri Pasternak successfully completed her thesis project at the University of Toronto.

The result is a 305-pg thesis, available online in PDF format:
http://shiripasternak.com/Pasternak_Shiri_S_201309_PhD_thesis.pdf

—-

Honour Your Word
Director: Martha Stiegman • Documentary Feature • 56m • Canada

Marylynn Poucachiche and Norman Matchewan faced tear gas and police batons when they joined their parents on the barricades to defend the Barriere Lake Algonquins’ traditional territory in the 1980s. Little did Marylynn and Norman  realize they would still be on the barricades over 20 years later, this time with their own young children at their sides.

Honour Your Word, is the dramatic story of a tiny First Nations community in Quebec with big strength of character and determination, and follows new Algonquin leaders, as their community fights to protect their land, way of life, and their language.

Here is a link to the trailer

The film was screened at the American Indian Film Festival on November 3, 2013. Canadian screening dates pending – stay tuned!

Here is the film’s official website: honouryourword-film.ca

UPDATE:
The film has been added to the roster for Cinema Politica which has autonomous local groups across the country and internationally that show films.

An Ottawa screening is planned for Tuesday April 22:
6:30pm at the Mayfair Theatre, $5-15 suggested donation.
Info: https://ipsmo.wordpress.com/2014/03/28/april-22-honour-your-word/
or https://www.facebook.com/events/266953060131769/

—-

 

Aug 14 – Film Screening of Inuit Knowledge and Climate Change

What: Film Screening of Inuit Knowledge and Climate Change

Where: Wednesday, August 14, 7PM

Where: 251 Bank Street, 2nd Floor (Octopus Books in Centretown)

—- Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/162833223900286/

Nunavut-based director Zacharias Kunuk (Atanarjuat The Fast Runner) and researcher and filmmaker Dr. Ian Mauro (Seeds of Change) have teamed up with Inuit communities to document their knowledge and experience regarding climate change. This new documentary, the world’s first Inuktitut language film on the topic, takes the viewer “on the land” with elders and hunters to explore the social and ecological impacts of a warming Arctic.

Join the Indigenous Peoples Solidarity Movement Ottawa (IPSMO), Cinema Politica, and Octopus Books for a screening and discussion of “Inuit Knowledge and Climate Change). A member of IPSMO will facilitate a discussion after the film.

This event is “Pay What You Can (Nobody is turned away)”

More about the movie:
The impact of climate change in Canada is discussed by those at its front lines. In this historic documentary by the legendary Isuma Productions, Inuit people speak first-hand about how their landscape is changing, how the sky has turned colour and if the polar bear really is endangered. Their insight – borne from centuries of shared knowledge – reveals a deep intimacy with their environment and convincingly challenges mainstream media accounts of climate change. Unsettling accounts of new flora, thawing permafrost and dwindling ice point directly to the truth that climate change has become a human rights issue for many Indigenous people.

More about IPSMO:
IPSMO is a grassroots organization that directly supports indigenous peoples in diverse struggles for justice. We also work within communities to challenge the lies and half-truths about indigenous peoples and colonization that dominate Canadian society. The organization is open to both indigenous and non-indigenous people, and focuses on local and regional campaigns.

IPSMO website: http://www.ipsmo.org
Octopus Books website: http://octopusbooks.ca/
Cinema Politica website: http://www.cinemapolitica.org/film/inuit-knowledge-and-climate-change

 

July 24-28: Asinabka Film & Media Arts Festival comes to Ottawa for the second year!


 

The Asinabka Film & Media Arts Festival – http://asinabkafestival.org – is bringing powerful and thought-provoking art and film to Ottawa for another summer. The Festival, to be held July 24-28 2013, provides an opportunity for Indigenous peoples to tell their own stories and showcase their rich and vibrant culture in the National Capital Region.

This year, the Festival will feature a wide array of programming, including a series of films that examine deep spiritual connections to the land and the important role that women play in Aboriginal communities. The Festival will also focus on human rights and sovereignty issues raised by the Idle No More movement.

The Festival will revolve around strong programming with over 10 film screenings, including a delicious pre-festival “Dinner And A Movie” night at Mitla Café, an outdoor opening and film screening on Victoria Island, film programs at the National Gallery of Canada and Club SAW, and a “Gallery Crawl” with curated art exhibitions at Gallery 101 and Fall Down Gallery.

 

Highlights of the Festival include:

• A screening of the documentary “The People of the Kattawapiskak River” that exposes the housing crisis faced by 1,700 Cree in Northern Ontario. Director Alanis Obomsawin will be in attendance and participate in a Q & A session led by Journalist Waubgeshig Rice.

• An opening night outdoor screening on Victoria Island, showing the critically acclaimed film “The Lesser Blessed” by Director Anita Doron and award winning Writer/Producer Richard Van Camp.

• A “Gallery Crawl” event including the opening of two person art exhibition “In-Digital” at Gallery 101 with the artists Jason Baerg and Christian Chapman in attendance, followed by a “Misko (Red) Party” at Fall Down Gallery with artwork by local and emerging artists, and an evening of multi-disciplinary performance with spoken word, live painting, experimental video-art, and live music.

• A “Dinner & A Movie” Night at Mitla Café (July 18 & 19), serving authentic Oaxacan Cuisine prepared by Chef Ana, and screening Director Roberto Olivares Ruiz’s film “Silvestre Pantaleón”.

• A weeklong video production program called “Video Works”, facilitated by Indigenous Culture & Media Innovations (ICMI), and held at the SAW Video Media Art Centre. Work produced during the program will be screened on the final night of the Festival.

• A “Late Night” film program at Club SAW titled “Fabulous Fantasies”, screening 8 short films that are quirky, humorous, dystopian, futuristic, queer, and fabulous.

 

“This event promises to be an excellent venue for advancing works from emerging and established Indigenous artists, both nationally and internationally,” stated Asinabka Co-Directors Howard Adler and Chris Wong. “Such a festival also has the potential to help Canadians better understand the realities of Indigenous peoples lives and experiences.”

This year’s Asinabka Film & Media Art Festival will feature more free programming then ever before. A large proportion of the Festival’s programming will be offered free of charge, including three film programs in partnership with the National Gallery of Canada and its “Sakahàn: International Indigenous Art exhibition”. As a result, the Festival will highlight Indigenous films not only from Canada, but also from Brazil, Russia, Australia, and the United States.

 

For more information about the Festival, please go to: http://asinabkafestival.org

For more information about the Festival, please contact Howard Adler at asinabkafestival at gmail.com or 613.889.9559

 

The Asinabka Film & Media Art Festival would like to acknowledge funding support from the Ontario Arts Council, an agency of the Government of Ontario, as well as funding support from the City of Ottawa. We also thank our Festival Partners, the National Gallery of Canada, Saw Video, Gallery 101, Saw Gallery, ICMI, Wapikoni Mobile, Fall Down Gallery and Aboriginal Experiences.
 

June 3 – Fundraiser for Tears 4 Justice cross-Canada walk – feat. screening of Highway of Tears

Monday June 3, 7:00-9:30pm
Mac Hall, Bronson Centre, 211 Bronson Ave. Algonquin Territory/Ottawa, ON K1R 6H4

Tears 4 Justice presents a screening of the documentary Highway of Tears to raise awareness of the missing and murdered women and children in Canada and to fundraise for the upcoming Tears 4 Justice walk across Canada from Membertou, Sydney, Nova Scotia to Prince Rupert, British Columbia. Come out and support an important initiative!

This event has been made possible with the help and support of:

  • Craig Benjamin of Amnesty International
  • Katie Quinn of Kairos
  • Sharmeen O’Baid Film maker of Highway of Tears
  • AFN
  • Aaron Benson
  • Elaine & Theland Kiclnosway

Performers will be:

  • Aaron Benson and his song for Stolen Sistas
  • Theland Kicknosway Blanket & Hoop dance

AFN to have a 50/50
and a raffle for donated items

—-

Link to this event’s Facebook page