The People’s Exhibition of Barrick at Museum of Nature!

You are invited to the People’s Exhibition of Barrick! 

4:30 pm, Tuesday, April 24 2012
In front of the main entrance of the Canadian Museum of Nature (facing Metcalfe St.)
240 McLeod St. Ottawa, unceded Algonquin Territory

To invite your friends via Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/196060743844592/

Barrick Out of The Canadian Museum of Nature!

On Tuesday, April 24, Ottawa’s Museum of Nature will celebrate a new partnership with Barrick Gold Corporation with the unveiling of the “Barrick Salon”. Barrick Gold is a Canadian mining company based in Toronto with horrendous records of environmental destruction, and human, labor and Indigenous rights violations around the world, including but not limiting to Chile, Argentina, Peru, Tanzania and Papua New Guinea.

This newly established public-private partnership between the Canadian Museum of Nature and Barrick Gold Corporation is fundamentally unacceptable! Because it contradicts the museum’s most important corporate value – “Respect for People and Nature”.

Please come and join us outside of the museum as we present the “People’s Exhibition of Barrick”, showcasing Barrick’s destructive mines around the world

We will be joined by Barrick-impacted community members and special guests to share knowledge about the impacts of this dangerous partnership:

  • The Diaguita Huascoaltinos Indigenous and Agricultural Community, impacted by Barrick Gold’s binational Pascua Lama project on the border of Chile and Argentina,
  • The Archuar Indigenous Community of the northern Peruvian Amazon,
  • Catherine Coumans of Mining Watch Canada, and
  • Sakura Saunders, the editor for Protestbarrick.net

For more information about Barrick Gold and the communities impacted by Barrick’s operation: Protestbarrick.net.

This public-private partnership is offensive, we want Barrick Out of The Canadian Museum of Nature!

WHO IS BARRICK GOLD?

Barrick Gold is the world’s largest gold mining company, founded and chaired by Peter Munk. With a former Prime Minister on their board and former executives sitting on the board of the Canadian Pension Plan, Barrick enjoys government funding and diplomatic support.

WHY PROTEST BARRICK?

In countries like Australia, Chile, Papua New Guinea and Tanzania, Barrick takes advantage of inadequate and poorly enforced regulatory controls to rob indigenous peoples of their lands, destroy sensitive ecosystems and agricultural land, support brutal police and security operations, and sue anyone who tries to report on it. In the context of this libel chill, Barrick has branded itself as the socially responsible mining giant and boasts its listing on the Dow Jones Sustainability Index.

Behind the scenes, Barrick has been singled out as the company most involved in the lobbying effort to stop private member’s bill C-300.

Source: Protestbarrick.net.

Protest: Barrick Gold AGM 2011

The Business of Gold in Guatemala

Please join us for a public event with Grahame Russell, co-director of Rights Action – a grassroots organization working together with indigenous grassroots communities in Central America in resistance to human rights violations and in support of struggles for democracy, justice and Mother Earth:

CRACKS IN THE WALLS OF IMPUNITY & CORRUPTION
IN GUATEMALA & HONDURAS, &
WITH GLOBAL RESOURCE EXTRACTION COMPANIES

6:30 pm
Tuesday, Sept. 28, 2010
Agora, Ground Floor of Jock Turcot University Centre, University of Ottawa (map)

In this event, we will present the documentary THE BUSINESS OF GOLD in Guatemala: Tale of a Conflict Foretold” followed by a Q&A session by Grahame Russell.

“The Business of Gold in Guatemala”, a 50-minute film, documents one struggle – the resistance of the Mayan-Mam people of San Miguel Ixtahuacan (in Guatemala) against the Canadian company Goldcorp Inc.

In May 2007, former chairman of the Vancouver-based mining company Goldcorp Inc – Ian Telfer – donated $25 million to the School of Management of the University of Ottawa.  In honour of his donation, the School of Management was renamed the Telfer School of Management, ignoring environmental and health harms, and other human rights violations, caused by the mines operated by Goldcorp in Guatemala, Honduras and else-where in the world.

During the presentation, Grahame will focus particular attention on:

How “northern actors” – the USA and Canadian governments, businesses, investors, the World Bank, etc. – contribute to and benefit from the unjust economic model and resultant exploitation and poverty, environmental harms, and repression; and, from there, how North Americans, from all walks of life, can get more involved in these and other struggles to help achieve “another world is possible and necessary”.

Related article:

GUATEMALA – GOLDCORP Inc. ALERT:
Threat of more mining related tension & violence in Mayan Mam community of Sacmuj, near Goldcorp’s “Marlin” mine

http://www.rightsaction.org/Alerts/Goldcorp_alert_092210.html

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RIGHTS ACTION (www.rightsaction.org)

With tax charitable status in Canada and the USA, Rights Action funds and works to eliminate poverty and the underlying causes of poverty.  RA supports community-based development, environmental, disaster relief and human rights projects and organizations in Guatemala and Honduras, as well as in Chiapas [Mexico], El Salvador and Haiti.  RA educates about and is involved in other work aimed at critically understanding unjust north-south relations and global development, environmental and human rights issues and the challenges of poverty eradication.

GRAHAME RUSSELL

Grahame – a Canadian – lives in Connecticut with his two children.  He is a graduate of the University of Guelph (Latin American studies) and the Faculty of Law, Ottawa University.  From 1984-1995, Grahame worked with a range of development, environmental and human rights solidarity and NGO groups in Mexico and Central America, living for 8 years in the region.  With Rights Action since 1995, Grahame has led Rights Action’s work in the USA and Canada.  Grahame’s work has taken him throughout Guatemala, Honduras, Chiapas and Oaxaca, as well as to El Salvador and Haiti.  Grahame speaks and publishes regularly about the wide range of issues referred to above.  He is the author of: “The Never Ending” (1992) and “Code Z59.5: There is Only One People Here” (2010).

THE BUSINESS OF GOLD in Guatemala: Tale of a Conflict Foretold

Even as the government of Guatemala was signing the 1996 “Peace Accords”, it was – unbeknownst to the Guatemala population – giving out hundreds of mining concessions to international (mainly Canadian) mining companies.  Since the early 2000s, serious conflicts have broken out in Guatemala – as well as else-where in Central America – due to the environmental and health harms and other violations of human and indigenous rights being caused by mainly Canadian mining companies.

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* This event is brought to you by Indigenous Peoples’ Solidarity Movement – Ottawa, Mining Watch Canada, Public Service Alliance of Canada – Social Justice Fund, and Territorio Libre

* Admission is free, donations are welcome.  All donations will go to support the community groups Rights Action works with in Guatemala & Honduras.

July 9: Grassy Narrows Youth Leader Speaks Out

Chrissy Swain will speak and will be presenting a new documentary
Thursday, July 9
Umi Café at 6pm
610 Somerset St. W
ipsmo@riseup.net
https://ipsmo.wordpress.com

Chrissy Swain, a Grassy Narrows youth leader and mother will be speaking about the ongoing struggles for healing and land protection at Grassy Narrows. Chrissy will also present a new documentary about the history of the conflict there.

She is speaking out in order to draw attention to links between environmental destruction and the destruction of communities, to open dialogue about protecting and healing the earth, as well as healing communities and the relationships between them.

Since arriving in Southern Ontario last week, Chrissy Swain has already visited the Anishnabe protest camp at Dump Site 41 in Tiny Township, had a presence at the rally in solidarity with Six Nations against the formation of the Caledonia Militia in Cayuga, participated in the Peace Caravan to Akwesasne, and spoke on stage in front of over 1000 music fans at the Propaghandi concert on June 26 in Toronto.

Last year, Chrissy led a group of 22 youth from Grassy Narrows (and a few other First Nations communities), on the Protecting Our Mother Walk—over 1800 kilometres from Grassy Narrows to Toronto—which became a catalyst for the Gathering of Mother Earth Protectors and Sovereignty Sleepover last May at Queens Park, where the message was:

*Respect the right of First Nations to say no to economic exploitation and environmental destruction, no criminalisation of land protectors.*

* *

This year, Chrissy is planning another walk which is scheduled to leave from Grassy Narrows for Ottawa on August 24th.  This year’s walk will bring together representatives from communities across the province to deliver a united message to Ottawa that the rights of First Nations must be honoured and land protectors must not be criminalised.

Chrissy has been an integral leader in the Grassy Narrows resistance to logging on their territory, in the empowerment of youth, and the traditional resurgence of Anishnabe culture that is taking place in their community.

On December 2nd, 2002, the youth of the Grassy Narrows First Nation established a blockade on a logging road in their territory, and sparked what is now the longest standing and highest profile indigenous logging blockade in Canadian history. Grassy Narrows (Asubpeeschoseewagong) is a small Anishnabe community about 80 kilometres north of Kenora in Northwest Ontario. *The Grassy Narrows community has been through many traumas including relocation, residential schools, mercury contamination, flooding of sacred grounds and burial sites, and clearcut logging of their traditional territory. However, resistance is strong at Grassy Narrows where people are actively resisting the continued destruction of their territories, re-occupying their lands, reviving their culture and fighting for the right to manage their land as they see fit. ***

This tour, for Chrissy is a spiritual journey inspired by dreams and recent incidents. Chrissy and Grassy Narrows organizer Judy Dasilva visited the site of the Macintosh Residential School near Kenora. There, behind the old school site, instead of a memorial, they found several large hydro towers right at the site of the graves of those children who died at the school, disrespecting their memory.  Following the visit, Chrissy had dreams telling her that this was to be a symbol of the connection between the destruction of Indigenous lands, and the destruction of their communities. She began planning a second Protecting Our Mother Earth Walk that had been tentatively scheduled to leave Grassy Narrows on June 15.

The recent and ongoing standoff at Akwesasne is a spiritual sign to her that the time for the journey is imminent. The events of Friday June 12 (when the OPP brutally raided a solidarity blockade in Tyendinaga, and also escalated the police crackdown on protests by women from the Beausoleil First Nation who are camped at Dump Site 41) were a signal to Chrissy to forgo the walk across Northern Ontario so that she could be here now, talking to people in both settler and Indigenous communities, trying to build solidarity and support for communities engaged in land protection struggles, and to work towards healing.

“The government does not understand that words are not good enough. Talking ‘green’ and making empty apologies that don’t actually deal with real issues is not good enough. We have to *protect* the land—protect our Mother Earth. I want to tell Harper that apologies are not good enough. Canada needs to give proper respect to the victims, families and survivors of the residential schools. We need Canada to recognize the damage those schools have done to our communities and cultures, and we need an end to the destruction of our lands, and an end to native people being criminalised when they stand up for their rights to protect their lands, their cultures, and their communities.”
-Chrissy Swain, June 2009

Upcoming Events:

  • London, July 4*.  Empowerment Infoshop, 636 Queens Ave, 6-9pm. pbd.
  • Hamilton, July 7*.  Sky Dragon Centre, 27 King William St, 6-9pm. pbd.
  • Ottawa, July 9*.  Umi Cafe, 610 Somerset St W, 6-9pm.
  • Brockville, July 10*. St. Paul’s Anglican Church, 37 Victoria Ave, 7-9pm.