Indigenous Solidarity for Settlers workshops March 19 & 21

Indigenous Solidarity for Settlers

 

Tuesday, March 19 at 6:00pm
University of Ottawa, Jock Turcott University Centre (UCU) room 207 (facebook event)

or

Thursday, March 21 at 6:00pm
McNabb Community Centre, 180 Percy St. (facebook event)

 

Free
Wheelchair Accessible
Contact us in advance regarding ASL
ipsmo@riseup.net – www.ipsmo.org

 

482692_10200650314321052_824841453_n[1]Matt (the facilitator for this workshop) is a white male, a survivor of childhood abuse and police violence, who has lived most of his adult life in poverty.

He has been engaged in indigenous solidarity activism for the past six years, primarily with the Indigenous Peoples` Solidarity Movement of Ottawa (IPSMO) and is also a part of Books to Prisoners Ottawa.

 

The goal of the workshop is to educate non-indigenous people about the importance of indigenous solidarity, to teach people and learn from them about what solidarity means and how to do it, and to work on our decolonial analyses.

1) Case study

Using a popular education exercise that is based in the experiences of the Lubicon Cree we explore what colonization is and, to some extent, how it feels.

2) What is solidarity?

We focus on what solidarity is and how to “do it”. The word solidarity is used a lot, especially in radical organizing, but it is not always easy to define or to do. Put simply we believe that it is essential in solidarity work to “listen, take direction and stick around”.

3) Looking at colonization from an anti-oppressive framework

This part of the workshop focuses on building a theoretical understanding of colonization and oppression. It is based on Andrea Smith’s analysis of the role that Heteropatriarchy and White Supremacy play in colonization, and also examines how colonization has been, and continues to be, imposed through individual, institutional and cultural oppression.Orientation for the IPSM Ottawa

Covenant Chain Link III – Oct 19-20, 2012

A different Canada… begins with respect, relationships and openness to change.

Click for PDF of poster

Join us Friday evening, October 19th and all day Saturday, October 20th to learn more about Indigenous peoples’ perspectives on education and how to build respectful, positive and lasting partnerships.

Covenant Chain Link III will include movie screenings on Friday evening, guest speakers, panel discussions, workshops, spoken word performances, displays, resources, networking opportunities and more!

Guest speakers include:

  • Simona Arnatsiaq, Inuit rights activist and residential school survivor
  • Albert Dumont, Algonquin elder, poet and storyteller
  • Francine Lemay, translator, sister of Marcel Lemay, who was killed during the 1990 Oka crisis
  • Lois McCallum, Métis Senator and rights advocate
  • Susanna Singoorie, Inuit elder
  • Joel Westheimer, Faculty of Education, University of Ottawa

Where: Bronson Centre, Mac Hall, 211 Bronson Avenue, Ottawa

When: On October 19th (registration at 6:15 pm) & October 20th (registration at 8:30 am)

For more information: Contact Ed Bianchi ebianchi@kairoscanada.org / 613-235-9956 ext. 221 / http://www.kairoscanada.org

To register – only $45: http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/covenantchainlink

This event is co-sponsored by: KAIROS Canada, Legacy of Hope, Ottawa Catholic School Board, Presbyterian Church in Canada, Project of Heart, Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, United Church of Canada

DOWNLOADS: poster brochure

 
~~ SCHEDULE ~~

FRIDAY EVENING

  • 6:15 Registration & Gathering
  • 7:00 Presentation by Francine Lemay
  • 8:00 Film Screenings
    – Residential School Resistance Narrative Project, a collaboration with Indigenous youth
    – Why White People are Funny

SATURDAY

  • 8:30 Coffee & Gathering
  • 9:00 Ceremonial Opening with elders
    Albert Dumont
    Lois McCallum
    Susanna Singoorie
  • Panel Presentation
    The elders reflect on our theme:
    A different Canada…begins with respect, relationship and openness to change
    Moderator: Viola Thomas Truth & Reconciliation Commission
  • HEALTH BREAK
  • Focus Groups with each elder
    You are invited to join one conversation
  • 12:30 LUNCH
  • 1:30 Spoken Word Poetry
    Presentations by Indigenous and refugee youth
  • 2:00 Presentation by Professor Joel Westheimer
    Engaging citizenship in a deeper way
  • 3:00 HEALTH BREAK
  • 3:15 Open Space conversation
    One way each participant will engage in building a nation marked by relationships of reconciliation and hope for the future
  • 4:15 Closing

IPSMO member Sylvia Smith receives Governor General’s Award for educational project on residential schools

IPSMO member Sylvia Smith receives Governor General’s Award for educational project on residential schools

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 9, 2011

OTTAWA – Sylvia Smith, for her work as coordinator of Project of Heart, will be presented with a Governor General’s History Award for Excellence in Teaching on Monday.

Sylvia Smith presenting Project of Heart at Ontario Institute for Studies in Education

Project of Heart is a hands-on, collaborative, inter-generational, inter-institutional artistic endeavour that commemorates the lives of the thousands of Indigenous children who died as a result of the Indian Residential School experience.

Participants have used the learning module to connect with a specific residential school history and the Indigenous people whose traditional territory the school was located on, and have shared the experience with an Aboriginal elder and/or residential school survivor. Follow-up research and social justice action is part of the process for each participant.

Smith founded Project of Heart in 2007 in collaboration with her students at Elizabeth Wyn Wood Alternate High School Program in Ottawa, and over 50 schools, faith communities, and workplaces across Canada have since taken part.

Indigenous Peoples Solidarity Movement Ottawa (IPSMO) member Pei-Ju Wang states, “We are very pleased to see this award recognizing the work that Sylvia and others with Project of Heart have done to help non-Aboriginal Canadians acknowledge, and take ownership and action for, the devastating policy of residential schools that continues to have lasting effects on Indigenous peoples here. Her contributions to our group’s work have similarly been about moving people towards achieving justice, understanding and healing in the relationship between the Canadian state and the First Peoples of this land.”

Warren McBride, a fellow teacher at Elizabeth Wyn Wood, observes, “One of the main attributes of Project of Heart is that it provides an opportunity for students to apply their knowledge of the past to issues that are continuing today. Sylvia has been able to create an educational experience that has direct relevance to the news headlines of December 2011.”

Smith herself says, “Project of Heart is something that belongs to all who embrace it.  Indeed, it is the collective aspect of the Project that gives it its strength. I am honoured to be the name attached to it.”

Contact:
IPSMO: ipsmo@riseup.net

For more information:

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