Wed May 28 – Decolonize & Anti-Oppression Workshop, Ottawa

Decolonize & Anti Oppression Workshop – Ottawa (Algonquin Territory)

Taking place on Algonquin Territory.

 

DnAO may28 imgWednesday May 28th, 6:30pm – 9:30pm
at Bethel Fieldhouse (166 Frank St) in St.Luke’s Park

 

This workshop features a discussion about colonization from an indigenous context within Canada, as well as working on Anti-Oppression terminology, investigation & circle discussion and sharing knowledge about how to do community organizing, creating meaningful solidarity building, conflict resolutions processes & horizontal group/community structures.

Hosted by Indigenous Peoples’ Solidarity Movement Ottawa
In solidarity with the grassroots community actions of Idle No More.

Facilitated by: Tami Starlight is traveling from Vancouver / unceded Coast Salish territory to Montreal / Mohawk, Kanienkehaka, & Haudenosaunee territory.

 

Donation page for those who cannot make it. Please donate and pass it on. (every bit helps)
http://theantioppressionnetwork.wordpress.com/donate-now/

 

-When/Where-

Cost: $5 – $50 sliding scale; no one turned away due to lack of funds

Date: Wednesday, May 28th, 2014
Time: 6:30pm – 9:30pm

Location: Bethel Fieldhouse (166 Frank St) in St. Luke’s Park
(Near the corner of Elgin and Gladstone; the stand alone building in the middle of the park behind St. Louis Wings and Slice & Co.)

 

-What-

  • Discussion about colonization from an indigenous context within Canada
  • Anti-Oppression terminology investigation & circle discussion
  • Community organizing, meaningful solidarity building, conflict resolutions & horizontal group/community structures

 

-Accessibility-

 

-URLs-

 

 

-Contact Information-

for more info or accessibility requests please email:
decolonizeantioppression@gmail.com

 

——

 

Indigenous Solidarity for Settlers workshops March 19 & 21

Indigenous Solidarity for Settlers

 

Tuesday, March 19 at 6:00pm
University of Ottawa, Jock Turcott University Centre (UCU) room 207 (facebook event)

or

Thursday, March 21 at 6:00pm
McNabb Community Centre, 180 Percy St. (facebook event)

 

Free
Wheelchair Accessible
Contact us in advance regarding ASL
ipsmo@riseup.net – www.ipsmo.org

 

482692_10200650314321052_824841453_n[1]Matt (the facilitator for this workshop) is a white male, a survivor of childhood abuse and police violence, who has lived most of his adult life in poverty.

He has been engaged in indigenous solidarity activism for the past six years, primarily with the Indigenous Peoples` Solidarity Movement of Ottawa (IPSMO) and is also a part of Books to Prisoners Ottawa.

 

The goal of the workshop is to educate non-indigenous people about the importance of indigenous solidarity, to teach people and learn from them about what solidarity means and how to do it, and to work on our decolonial analyses.

1) Case study

Using a popular education exercise that is based in the experiences of the Lubicon Cree we explore what colonization is and, to some extent, how it feels.

2) What is solidarity?

We focus on what solidarity is and how to “do it”. The word solidarity is used a lot, especially in radical organizing, but it is not always easy to define or to do. Put simply we believe that it is essential in solidarity work to “listen, take direction and stick around”.

3) Looking at colonization from an anti-oppressive framework

This part of the workshop focuses on building a theoretical understanding of colonization and oppression. It is based on Andrea Smith’s analysis of the role that Heteropatriarchy and White Supremacy play in colonization, and also examines how colonization has been, and continues to be, imposed through individual, institutional and cultural oppression.Orientation for the IPSM Ottawa

Video interview: Harsha Walia on Anti-Oppression, Decolonization and Responsible Allyship

“Given the devastating cultural, spiritual, economic, linguistic and political impacts of colonialism on Indigenous people in Canada, any serious attempt by non-natives at allying with Indigenous struggles must entail solidarity in the fight against colonization.

Non-natives must be able to position ourselves as active and integral participants in a decolonization movement for political liberation, social transformation, renewed cultural kinships and the development of an economic system that serves rather than threatens our collective life on this planet.

A growing number of social movements are recognizing that Indigenous self-determination must become the foundation for all our broader social justice mobilizing.”

– Harsha Walia, from the article Decolonizing Together
 

 
This 10-min interview was conducted at the PowerShift Canada 2012 conference in Ottawa, unceded Algonquin Territory, on October 28 2012 by Greg Macdougall, EquitableEducation.ca, for IPSMO
 


 

May 1st: Indigenous Solidarity for Settlers workshop

Workshop: Indigenous Solidarity for Settlers

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Saturday, May 1st at 3pm
Jack Purcell Community Centre
320 Jack Purcell Lane (off Elgin, near Gilmour)
ipsmo@riseup.net
http://www.ipsmo.org
Part of the Organizing for Justice Mayday Weekend
http://www.OrganizingForJustice.ca
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The goal of the workshop is to …educate non-indigenous people about the importance of indigenous solidarity and to teach people and learn from them about what solidarity means and how to do it.

The IPSM Ottawa is a predominantly settler organization that works toward building a movement of non-indigenous people actively supporting indigenous people struggling for justice and decolonization.

Our workshop “Indigenous Solidarity for Settlers” consists of three parts:

1) Looking at colonization from an anti-oppressive framework.

We look at how colonization has historically and continues to be imposed through individual behaviour and institutional and cultural oppression.

2) What does solidarity mean?

We focus on what solidarity is and how to “do it”. The word solidarity is used a lot, especially in radical organizing, but it is not always easy to define or to do. Put simply we believe that it is essential in solidarity work to “listen, take direction and stick around”.

3) Case study

Using an example from the organizing that the IPSM has done, such as organizing in support of the Barriere Lake Algonquin, we will explore what solidarity work looks like in practice. Using concrete examples from our own experiences we analyze the strengths and weaknesses of this organizing in order to examine how to do solidarity work well.