Niigaan: In Conversation – Red Man Laughing Live Podcast (VIDEO)

niigaan-rml
 

Reflecting upon 1 year of Idle No More – Biiskaabiiyang: Returning to Ourselves, featuring (L-R): Wab Kinew, Celina Cada-Matasawagon, Geraldine King, Leanne Simpson, Serpent River FN Chief Isadore Day, Lee Maracle, Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs Grand Chief Derek Nepinak, and host Ryan McMahon.

Intros by Niigaan organizers Linda Nothing and Jocelyn Formsma, followed by stand-up segment by Ryan McMahon and then the panel discussion.

Hoop dance by Theland Kicknosway (separate video).

December 10, 2013 at the National Arts Centre, Ottawa.

*Note: At the event, there was a special announcement from Ryan McMahon: Red Man Laughing will be coming to CBC Radio this year!
 

Ryan’s notes on the discussion:

Winter Time is the time of year where the earth becomes covered in snow. It’s a time for rest and reflection. Last winter we rose. We did not rest, we did not reflect. We took to the malls, the streets, and the hills. The community rallied around, there was a desperate feeling, people gathered at teach-ins, the scent of medicines was everywhere. We need to get that energy back. Niigaan: In Conversation asked ourselves, what happened to the fire? The problems are still here, we still have work to do. Let’s get together as a community and talk about our future.

A few highlights from this talk that you should listen for are:

  • Lee Maracle talking about the prophecy that told us that we’d be teaching the world about the power of our drums & community.
  • Chief Isadore Day breaking down the importance of self care and taking care of the homefires.
  • Leanne Simpson sharing her thoughts on the Wampum Belt – letting us know what the belt DOES mean to her and what it DOES NOT mean to her.
  • A spirited and heart felt discussion on education for Native Youth (FNEA rejections) – we can/need to take better care of our young people as they head to institutions.

 

Websites: Niigaan.caRedManLaughing.com

Video (2hr20min) by Greg Macdougall, EquitableEducation.ca
Or listen to the podcast at Red Man Laughing
 

 

Theland Kicknosway – Hoop Dance:

 

Wed Dec 11 – Public consultation on future of Chaudiere Falls islands / Domtar property

Photo © The Ottawa Citizen
Photo © The Ottawa Citizen

The proposed sale and development of islands at Chaudiere Falls could impact the possibility of the creation of the Asinabka National Indigenous Centre envisioned by late Algonquin leader Grandfather William Commanda.

Windmill Development Group is holding a public consultation on Wed Dec 11 at the Canadian Museum of Civilization in Gatineau, with an open house from 5-9pm featuring bilingual presentations at 6pm and again at 7:30pm

You can attend to help put the Asinabka vision on the map!

The developers ask that you register in order to attend the consultation (which they are now also calling a ‘promo event’) at the bottom of this link: www.the-isles.ca

(Invite people on Facebook)

 

OFFICIAL NOTICE OF CONSULTATION FROM WINDMILL
http://www.windmilldevelopments.com/2013/12/windmill-hosts-community-consultation-for-domtar-lands/

 

INFO ON THE ASINABKA VISION
www.asinabka.com/
3min video: http://youtu.be/uFC6aSSmRs0
1-pg doublesided bilingual brochure for printing:
https://ipsmo.files.wordpress.com/2013/12/asinabka-bn-brochure-final-french-eng.pdf

Message from Romola, Grandfather Commanda’s assistant:
” I am also mindful of Grandfather’s words after he first met with Domtar in 2006/7 about freeing the dam, in face of their negative response: – ‘We are not going to fight with boxing gloves; we talk’ – and he ended by telling the dozen or so representatives, ‘I love you, my brothers.’
Thanks for your interest and support in this effort to protect the Sacred Chaudiere Falls for the public-at-large versus privatization interests. All the best.”

 

MEDIA ON WINDMILL DEVELOPMENT PLANS

[Kitigan Zibi Algonquin Chief Gilbert] Whiteduck told the Citizen on Monday that a long talked-about National Indigenous Centre on Victoria Island should be an integral part of redevelopment of the former Domtar lands.
“I don’t believe this project should go forward without the indigenous centre. It should be the jewel in the crown” of Ottawa riverfront redevelopment, he said.
http://www.ottawacitizen.com/Domtar+lands+proposal+must+miss+opportunity+Gatineau+mayor+says/9237977/story.html

An Ottawa development company is “days away” from a deal to buy and transform waterfront property that once housed the Domtar paper mill.
Windmill Developments said they’re very close to buying 37 acres of land on Chaudière Island, with a plan to build a sustainable community they’re calling Les Isles.
A letter of intent from July said Windmill’s plan is to “reinvent a historically rich industrial space into a vibrant, world-class, sustainable, pedestrian-oriented, mixed-use development” that’s sensitive to the island’s history.
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/chaudière-waterfront-redevelopment-deal-days-away-1.2447035

 

Algonquins of Barriere Lake: New film and thesis project now out

 
A new film, Honour Your Word, and a 305-pg thesis document, highlight the ongoing efforts of the Algonuins of Barriere Lake community.

—-

On Jurisdiction and Settler Colonialism:
The Algonquins of Barriere Lake Against the Federal Land Claims Policy

In September, Barriere Lake Solidarity activist and PhD candidate Shiri Pasternak successfully completed her thesis project at the University of Toronto.

The result is a 305-pg thesis, available online in PDF format:
http://shiripasternak.com/Pasternak_Shiri_S_201309_PhD_thesis.pdf

—-

Honour Your Word
Director: Martha Stiegman • Documentary Feature • 56m • Canada

Marylynn Poucachiche and Norman Matchewan faced tear gas and police batons when they joined their parents on the barricades to defend the Barriere Lake Algonquins’ traditional territory in the 1980s. Little did Marylynn and Norman  realize they would still be on the barricades over 20 years later, this time with their own young children at their sides.

Honour Your Word, is the dramatic story of a tiny First Nations community in Quebec with big strength of character and determination, and follows new Algonquin leaders, as their community fights to protect their land, way of life, and their language.

Here is a link to the trailer

The film was screened at the American Indian Film Festival on November 3, 2013. Canadian screening dates pending – stay tuned!

Here is the film’s official website: honouryourword-film.ca

UPDATE:
The film has been added to the roster for Cinema Politica which has autonomous local groups across the country and internationally that show films.

An Ottawa screening is planned for Tuesday April 22:
6:30pm at the Mayfair Theatre, $5-15 suggested donation.
Info: https://ipsmo.wordpress.com/2014/03/28/april-22-honour-your-word/
or https://www.facebook.com/events/266953060131769/

—-

 

Aug. 22 & 23: Ottawa Launch of Honouring Indigenous Women: Hearts of Nations – Vol. 2

Please spread the word widely and invite your friends and colleagues to join you!
Come Celebrate the Launch of this Amazing Collection of Writing and Visual Arts!
 
7:00 pm Thursday, August 22
2nd FLOOR, 251 BANK ST. OTTAWA
Double book launch with Louise Vien’s new children’s book “Welcome to the Roubabbou Collection”!
Hosted by the Sound of My Heart Collective 
Sponsored by Indigenous Peoples Solidarity Movement Ottawa & 25OneCommunity
 
6:00 pm Friday, August 23
1155 LOLA ST @ COVENTRY RD. OTTAWA
Hosted by Minwaashin Lodge Culture Program
Wheelchair Accessible
OC TRANSPO BUS #18 
Parking Available in the front & back

Everyone is Welcome!

 
Local Artists: Angela Ashawasegai, Roberta Donna Della-Picca, Louise Vien and Zainab Amadahy will be attending to talk about their work that is part of this amazing collection. Louise Vien will be present only on August 22. She will also launch her recent published book “Welcome to the Roubabbou Collection“, a children’s book, with us. 
 
Join us for some drumming & refreshments while showing community support. There will be a draw at both events!
 
Books will be available for purchase.
 
** This is part of our multi-city launch in late summer and early fall 2013 in cities including Vancouver, Edmonton, Regina, Toronto, Peterborough, Ottawa and Manistee (Michigan, US).
 
Honouring Indigenous Women: Hearts of Nations – Vol. 2 is a collection of creative writings and visual arts by Indigenous women alongside their allies from many nations across Turtle Island (North America). It is made possible by 62 writers and artists reflecting and sharing their lived experiences with regards to their relationships with the land, birth mothers, families, communities, and themselves. This anthology is available online and can be found at http://thesoundofmyheart.weebly.com/.
 
“Welcome to the Roubabbou Collection” series by Louise Vien contain 13 tiny books. It is a child’s first Métis French word book, ideal to stimulate his or her thirst for learning. Each page is entirely in colour with familiar cultural Métis objects to help promote our ancestors vocabulary for the next generation.This collection of books is a great educative resource for children between the ages 2  to 11. It introduces the child to an old variety of phonetic French spoken by the Métis of the 18th and 19th century of which is still spoken today. This particular French is also at the origin of the the Mitchif language seen mostly in western Canada (mix language of French and Cree). For more info: http://metistraditions.com/.
 

About the Sound of My Heart Collective:
 
The Sound of My Heart Collective is an initiative of a small group of women from diverse backgrounds based in Ottawa, Ontario on unceded Algonquin Territory. Our mandate is to carry out Honouring Indigenous Women project, which is to publish the productions of Indigenous women and their allies through the arts of storytelling, poetry, painting, drawing, photography, and sound. Its objective is to raise awareness about protecting and honouring Indigenous women and strives to put an end to all forms of violence. It offers a space to deepen our understanding of Indigenous women on Turtle Island (North America), to put Indigenous women’s voices, experiences and realities front and center, and to foster strong solidarity between native and non-native communities. It is a solidarity initiative to support the existing efforts of Indigenous women. Website: http://thesoundofmyheart.weebly.com/.
 
About Minwaashin Lodge – An Aboriginal Women’s Support Centre:
 
Minwaashin Lodge provides a range of programs and services to First Nations, Inuit and Métis women and children (regardless of status) who are survivors of domestic and other forms of violence, and who may also be suffering the effects of the residential school system. All programs and services are provided in the context of cultural beliefs and values to ensure a holistic approach is used as part of the healing journey. Website: http://www.minlodge.com/,
 
About 25OneCommunity:
25One is a collaborative, shared workspace for groups and individuals engaged in progressive social and cultural missions. We offer groups shared office spaces and facilities in a dynamic work environment, for non-profit organizations, social entrepreneurs, freelancers and consultants. Facebook Page: http://facebook.com/25onecommunity
 

** We are still seeking funds to print and carry out our multi-city launch. Please support our work and donate generously, if you can! Here is the link to make donations: http://thesoundofmyheart.weebly.com/donate.html.
 
Thank You, Chi Miigwetch.

Aug 24: Show Up, Shout Out and Shut Down the Tar Sands!

Show Up, Shout Out and Shut Down the Tar Sands!
Demonstration and Festivities

===========================================

Dundonald Park
(Somerset and Lyon)
Saturday, August 24, 2:00pm
Bring your banners, pots, pans, drums and whatever!

Organized by DecLine 9 Ottawa
This is not a permitted march

===========================================

Free Food and Drinks
There will be music and drumming

===========================================

Speakers:

Ben Powless (Mohawk), Ecology Ottawa
Vanessa Gray (Ojibway), Anti-Line 9 Organizer

Musicians:

Vela
Adam III

=======================================

On August 24th, land defenders, activists and allies are putting their bodies on the line by blockading Alberta’s Highway 63, which is the MAIN ARTERY that services the tar sands production sites north of Fort McMurray! They have made a call for an international day of action against the tar sands, and Decline 9 Ottawa is organizing a protest in solidarity with the blockaders.

It is essential to support the people who will be on Highway 63 this day, both to honour their actions and to let the authorities know that people across Turtle Island, and around the world will be watching
them.

We are everywhere! We want to build a world where everyone fits!

We want to celebrate all of the creative, beautiful and loving ways Indigenous and non-Indigenous people have been protecting Mother Earth, waters, animals and future generations. We will be coming together as a community, to show our solidarity with the protestors, and our commitment to building a better world together. We want a movement that is stronger in numbers, less apathetic, and more empathetic with each other and with the natural world.

——————————————

YouTube, “Shut Down the Tar Sands Highway”:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QGTQ2gI3pMk (Preview) (Preview)
Vancouver Media Co-operative, “Shut Down the Tar Sands Highway:
http://vancouver.mediacoop.ca/fr/video/shut-down-tar-sands-highway/18211

=======================================

Highway 63 is the main artery that services the Tar Sands production sites north of Fort McMurray. The Tar Sands are one of the most, if not THE most, environmentally destructive projects that exists today.

The Tar Sands exist due to the historic and ongoing colonization of Turtle Island (North America) and the Treaties made between the Canadian Government and Indigenous Nations. The Canadian government has never honoured the spirit in which the treaties were made, and in practice has unilaterally violated virtually all the agreements which it made.

We are all downstream from the tar sands, whether that’s literally or through exposures to the many pipelines that are being built to service tar sands industry. We are all effected: worker’s are forced
to work in dangerous and toxic environments; migrants workers are denied citizenship rights, super-exploited, segregated from and paid less than Canadian citizens, and often experience racism; women and women workers have said that they frequently experience physical and sexual violence; women who live close to the industries and refineries are subjected to dangerous toxins that damage their reproductive systems, and have more risks of miscarriage; children are born with birth defects, and have much higher instances of serious physical health issues; both children and adults in affected communities experience grave physical and mental health issues, including cancers, post traumatic stress, developmental disabilities; animals are disappearing, as more and more are being killed or chased away from their natural habitats.

It is important to remember that the ecological degradation wrought by the tar sands happens everyday, and that the scale of the destruction is so great, and with such dire impacts for everyone, especially the environment and directly effected communities, but also in terms of climate change and global warming, that the Tar Sands need to be a political priority for every person, and movement in Canada.

The movement against tar sands is at a critical juncture. Currently the expansion of the tar sands is being significantly impeded by the fierce resistance that pipelines have attracted continentwide. The industry’s difficulties in moving their product West and South has led to Enbridge’s Line 9 Reversal project and TransCanada’s Energy East Pipeline Project, both of which cut through Ontario & Quebec on their way to the East coast. The time has come for people in our region to come together, declaring that we will not be complicit in the exploitation of Mother Earth and that we do not want these pipelines carrying Tar Sands oil running through our communities.

Join us!

=======================================

This event has been endorsed by:

The Indigenous Peoples’ Solidarity Movement – Ottawa (IPSMO)
350 Ottawa

=======================================

For more information on:

Indigenous People: http://canadiandimension.com/articles/1760

Environment:
http://www.canadiangeographic.ca/magazine/jun08/feature_tar_sands.asp

Migrant workers:
http://oilsandstruth.org/increase-migrant-workers-canada-opens-door-abuses

Women: http://www.dominionpaper.ca/articles/1468

Racism:
http://oilsandstruth.org/racism-tar-sands-exploiting-foreign-workers-and-poisoning-indigenous-people

Children: http://thetyee.ca/News/2013/03/22/Alberta-Family-Flees-Oil-Sands/

Health: http://oilsandsrealitycheck.org/facts/human-rights-3/

Animals:
http://oilsandstruth.org/twomouthed-fish-discovered-near-alberta-tar-sands-two-stories

General: http://desmog.ca/2013/05/15/10-reasons-canada-rethink-tar-sands

================

Aug 14 – Film Screening of Inuit Knowledge and Climate Change

What: Film Screening of Inuit Knowledge and Climate Change

Where: Wednesday, August 14, 7PM

Where: 251 Bank Street, 2nd Floor (Octopus Books in Centretown)

—- Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/162833223900286/

Nunavut-based director Zacharias Kunuk (Atanarjuat The Fast Runner) and researcher and filmmaker Dr. Ian Mauro (Seeds of Change) have teamed up with Inuit communities to document their knowledge and experience regarding climate change. This new documentary, the world’s first Inuktitut language film on the topic, takes the viewer “on the land” with elders and hunters to explore the social and ecological impacts of a warming Arctic.

Join the Indigenous Peoples Solidarity Movement Ottawa (IPSMO), Cinema Politica, and Octopus Books for a screening and discussion of “Inuit Knowledge and Climate Change). A member of IPSMO will facilitate a discussion after the film.

This event is “Pay What You Can (Nobody is turned away)”

More about the movie:
The impact of climate change in Canada is discussed by those at its front lines. In this historic documentary by the legendary Isuma Productions, Inuit people speak first-hand about how their landscape is changing, how the sky has turned colour and if the polar bear really is endangered. Their insight – borne from centuries of shared knowledge – reveals a deep intimacy with their environment and convincingly challenges mainstream media accounts of climate change. Unsettling accounts of new flora, thawing permafrost and dwindling ice point directly to the truth that climate change has become a human rights issue for many Indigenous people.

More about IPSMO:
IPSMO is a grassroots organization that directly supports indigenous peoples in diverse struggles for justice. We also work within communities to challenge the lies and half-truths about indigenous peoples and colonization that dominate Canadian society. The organization is open to both indigenous and non-indigenous people, and focuses on local and regional campaigns.

IPSMO website: http://www.ipsmo.org
Octopus Books website: http://octopusbooks.ca/
Cinema Politica website: http://www.cinemapolitica.org/film/inuit-knowledge-and-climate-change

 

July 24-28: Asinabka Film & Media Arts Festival comes to Ottawa for the second year!


 

The Asinabka Film & Media Arts Festival – http://asinabkafestival.org – is bringing powerful and thought-provoking art and film to Ottawa for another summer. The Festival, to be held July 24-28 2013, provides an opportunity for Indigenous peoples to tell their own stories and showcase their rich and vibrant culture in the National Capital Region.

This year, the Festival will feature a wide array of programming, including a series of films that examine deep spiritual connections to the land and the important role that women play in Aboriginal communities. The Festival will also focus on human rights and sovereignty issues raised by the Idle No More movement.

The Festival will revolve around strong programming with over 10 film screenings, including a delicious pre-festival “Dinner And A Movie” night at Mitla Café, an outdoor opening and film screening on Victoria Island, film programs at the National Gallery of Canada and Club SAW, and a “Gallery Crawl” with curated art exhibitions at Gallery 101 and Fall Down Gallery.

 

Highlights of the Festival include:

• A screening of the documentary “The People of the Kattawapiskak River” that exposes the housing crisis faced by 1,700 Cree in Northern Ontario. Director Alanis Obomsawin will be in attendance and participate in a Q & A session led by Journalist Waubgeshig Rice.

• An opening night outdoor screening on Victoria Island, showing the critically acclaimed film “The Lesser Blessed” by Director Anita Doron and award winning Writer/Producer Richard Van Camp.

• A “Gallery Crawl” event including the opening of two person art exhibition “In-Digital” at Gallery 101 with the artists Jason Baerg and Christian Chapman in attendance, followed by a “Misko (Red) Party” at Fall Down Gallery with artwork by local and emerging artists, and an evening of multi-disciplinary performance with spoken word, live painting, experimental video-art, and live music.

• A “Dinner & A Movie” Night at Mitla Café (July 18 & 19), serving authentic Oaxacan Cuisine prepared by Chef Ana, and screening Director Roberto Olivares Ruiz’s film “Silvestre Pantaleón”.

• A weeklong video production program called “Video Works”, facilitated by Indigenous Culture & Media Innovations (ICMI), and held at the SAW Video Media Art Centre. Work produced during the program will be screened on the final night of the Festival.

• A “Late Night” film program at Club SAW titled “Fabulous Fantasies”, screening 8 short films that are quirky, humorous, dystopian, futuristic, queer, and fabulous.

 

“This event promises to be an excellent venue for advancing works from emerging and established Indigenous artists, both nationally and internationally,” stated Asinabka Co-Directors Howard Adler and Chris Wong. “Such a festival also has the potential to help Canadians better understand the realities of Indigenous peoples lives and experiences.”

This year’s Asinabka Film & Media Art Festival will feature more free programming then ever before. A large proportion of the Festival’s programming will be offered free of charge, including three film programs in partnership with the National Gallery of Canada and its “Sakahàn: International Indigenous Art exhibition”. As a result, the Festival will highlight Indigenous films not only from Canada, but also from Brazil, Russia, Australia, and the United States.

 

For more information about the Festival, please go to: http://asinabkafestival.org

For more information about the Festival, please contact Howard Adler at asinabkafestival at gmail.com or 613.889.9559

 

The Asinabka Film & Media Art Festival would like to acknowledge funding support from the Ontario Arts Council, an agency of the Government of Ontario, as well as funding support from the City of Ottawa. We also thank our Festival Partners, the National Gallery of Canada, Saw Video, Gallery 101, Saw Gallery, ICMI, Wapikoni Mobile, Fall Down Gallery and Aboriginal Experiences.
 

July 2 Book Launch – Aboriginal Rights Are Not Human Rights: In Defence of Indigenous Struggles, with author Peter Kulchyski

Tuesday July 2nd, 7pm
at 251 Bank Street, 2nd Floor (Octopus Books in Centretown)

Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/389732467799306

Join us for the Ottawa launch of Aboriginal Rights Are Not Human Rights: In Defence of Indigenous Struggles, by Peter Kulchyski.

Aboriginal rights do not belong to the broader category of universal human rights because they are grounded in the particular practices of aboriginal people. So argues Peter Kulchyski in a provocative book from the front lines of indigenous people’s struggles to defend their culture from the ongoing conquest of their traditional lands. Kulchyski shows that some differences are more different than others, and he draws a border between bush culture and mall culture, between indigenous people’s mode of production and the totalizing push of state-led capitalism.

Peter Kulchyski is a leading Canadian Native Studies scholar at the University of Manitoba. He has published numerous books on Aboriginal issues, including The Red Indians and Like the Sound of a Drum: Aboriginal Cultural Politics in Denendeh and Nunavut, which won the 2005 Alexander Kennedy Isbister Award for Non-Fiction. Dr. Kulchyski is a founding member of the Friends of Grassy Narrows/Winnipeg Indigenous Solidarity Network and the Defenders of the Land, both Aboriginal rights community activist groups.

For more:
Interview with author Peter Kulchyski (at LPG.ca)

Co-sponsors:
Arbeiter Ring Publishing, Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA), Indigenous Peoples Solidarity Movement (IPSMO) Ottawa, KAIROS Canada, MiningWatch Canada, Niigaan, Public Service Alliance of Canada (PSAC) National Capital Region

June 3 – Fundraiser for Tears 4 Justice cross-Canada walk – feat. screening of Highway of Tears

Monday June 3, 7:00-9:30pm
Mac Hall, Bronson Centre, 211 Bronson Ave. Algonquin Territory/Ottawa, ON K1R 6H4

Tears 4 Justice presents a screening of the documentary Highway of Tears to raise awareness of the missing and murdered women and children in Canada and to fundraise for the upcoming Tears 4 Justice walk across Canada from Membertou, Sydney, Nova Scotia to Prince Rupert, British Columbia. Come out and support an important initiative!

This event has been made possible with the help and support of:

  • Craig Benjamin of Amnesty International
  • Katie Quinn of Kairos
  • Sharmeen O’Baid Film maker of Highway of Tears
  • AFN
  • Aaron Benson
  • Elaine & Theland Kiclnosway

Performers will be:

  • Aaron Benson and his song for Stolen Sistas
  • Theland Kicknosway Blanket & Hoop dance

AFN to have a 50/50
and a raffle for donated items

—-

Link to this event’s Facebook page

 

June 14-16: Noongam Traditional Powwow

Welcome to the 16th Annual Noongam Traditional Powwow

June 14, 15, 16, 2013
Queen Juliana Park, nearby Dow’s Lake

Carling Ave & Preston (Prince of Wales Drive)
Ottawa, ON

Come and enjoy the weekend with us!

Drummers, Dancers, Spectators, Adults, Children, Seniors
Free Admission – Donations welcome at the gate – Free Parking

 

Friday June 14
3:00 p.m. – Gates Open
6:00 p.m. Warm Up
11:00 p.m. Powwow conclude for the night

Saturday June 15
Sunrise Ceremony
9:00 a.m. Gates Open
12:00 p.m. Grand Entry
5:00 p.m. Community Feast
6:00 p.m.Grand Entry
11:00 p.m. Powwow concludes for the night

Sunday June 16
Sunrise Ceremony
9:00 a.m. Gates Open
12:00 p.m. Grand Entry
5:00 p.m. Community Giveaway
5:30 p.m. Closing
6:00 p.m. Lunch
Have a safe and happy journey on the powwow trail

 

Bring your own lawn chairs, blankets, picnic dishes (Saturday) and come early. Come journey with us. All visitors and participants welcome.

We look forward to meeting you!

Native Arts/Crafts and Food Concessions

Volunteers Needed – Food Donations Needed – Giveaway items Needed

OC Transpo Bus Service: 85, 3
This is a family-oriented event, NO alcohol, NO Drugs, NO Pets

For more information:
E-mail: noongampowwow@yahoo.com
Web address: www.noongam.50megs.com/photo4.html