Indigenous Peoples Solidarity Movement Ottawa – www.ipsmo.org

June 10, 2014

A Walk for Mother Earth: June 15-22, from Kanehsatà:ke to Ottawa


walkformotherearthIPSMO stands in solidarity with ‘A Walk for Mother Earth’

June 15-22 – 8 days, 140km: The walk for a pipeline-free future continues…

From June 15th to June 22th, 2014, ‘A Walk For Mother Earth’ will continue the journey of ‘Peoples for Mother Earth’. They will be walking 140km over 8 days, from Kanehsatà:ke (or Hudson QC) to Ottawa ON, to continue efforts to oppose pipelines here and elsewheres.

On Sunday June 22nd, at 2:00pm, we will stand together on Parliament Hill in a welcoming of the walkers and to show our solidarity with all peoples working towards a pipeline-free future across North America.
*Note: there will also be a meet up point, 1:00pm at Rivierain Park (SW corner of Montreal Rd and North River Rd, just before the bridge to Rideau St), to join in with the walkers for the final 3km of the walk.


Background

The walk originated as the “People for Mother Earth”, that began May 10th in Cacouna QC and is planned to finish on June 14th in Kanehsatà:ke. This walk, carried out by citizens of Quèbec, consisted of an average of 20 km a day for 34 days. It began at the site of a proposed TransCanada seaport export station, and followed the route of the proposed TransCanada Energy East pipeline to Montreal, and then the route of the already-approved Enbridge Line 9 pipeline to Kanehsatà:ke. The walkers stop each day to connect with communities in an important mobilization against pipelines and fossil fuel exploitation.

For more information on the original “Peoples For Mother Earth” walk, please consult:


The Walk Continues…

A new group of citizens decided to continue the walk to Ottawa and Parliament Hill. The new walk will start in Kanehsatà:ke with a conference, celebration, and a ‘passing of the torch’ ceremony on June 14th starting at 10am. (click here for the June 14th event details on Facebook)

Here is the itinerary of the stops along the route, along with a link to an interactive map:

  • June 15th – Kanehsatà:ke/Hudson QC to Rigaud, QC
    You can meet up with the walkers (around) noon at the ‘Traverse Oka’ HUDSON ferry terminal: 158 Main, Hudson, (Québec) J0P1H0
    Or, the walk will arrive at 6pm at: L’Édifice Paul-Brasseur: 10 Rue St. Jean-Baptiste Est, Rigaud, QC
  • June 16th – Rigaud, QC to St. Eugène, ON
    Will be staying at St. Eugène ON- Centre Communautaire: 1123 Rue Labrosse St. Eugène, ON
  • June 17th – St. Eugène, ON to Vankleek Hill, ON
    Will be staying at Vankleek Hill Anglican Church- 5845 Church St. Vankleek Hill, ON
  • June 18th – Vankleek Hill, ON to Alfred, ON
    Will be staying at Alfred Recreation Centre-555 St. Philippe St. Alfred ON
  • June 19th – Alfred, ON to Plantagenet, ON
    Will be staying at Plantagenet-Centre de l’amour: 225 Rd. 21 Plantagenet, ON
  • June 20th – Plantagenet, ON to Clarence-Rockland, ON
    Will be staying at Clarence-Rockland: Rockland Arena (Jean-Marc Lalonde Arena)-1450 Park Ave. Rockland, ON
  • June 21st – Clarence-Rockland to Orléans, ON
    Will be staying at Ressurection Lutheran Church: 1325 Gaultois Ave. Gloucester, ON
  • June 22nd – Orléans, ON to Parliament Hill Ottawa
    Meet at at 1pm at a 1:00pm at Rivierain Park (SW corner of Montreal Rd and North River Rd, just before the bridge to Rideau St), to join in with the walkers for the final 3km of the walk.
    Or, be there to welcome the arrival on Parliament Hill at 2:00pm!


How to get involved

There are several ways you can get involved to support the Walk for Mother Earth:

  1. Join in for all or part of the walk beginning from Kanehsatà:ke on June 14th, or from one of the locations along the way! Contact Ashley Thackaberry: peopleformotherearth@gmail.com or 647-204-1147 to work out details.
    **see the comment on this post for a list of what to bring if you are going to join in on the walk
  2. Support the walk financially – you can make donations:
    - via this PayPal link,
    - or by e-transfer to peopleformotherearth@gmail.com
  3. Help spread the word:
    - share the link to this web page you’re currently visiting,
    - or the walk’s Facebook page,
    - or the Facebook event page for the June 22 arrival on Parliament Hill,
    - or print flyers out that you can distribute.
  4. Join us on Parliament Hill at 2pm on June 22nd, 2014

 

For more information on “A Walk For Mother Earth”

The ‘Peoples For Mother Earth’ website will also be updated to include info on the continuing ‘A Walk For Mother Earth’ : www.peuplespourlaterremere.ca

& the Twitter hashtags will continue in use for both walks: #MarcheTerreMere, #MotherEarthMarch

Short documentary on the “Peoples for Mother Earth” walk (bilingual):


June 4, 2014

Thurs June 19 – Indigenous Resistance & Solidarity: Against Pipelines, For The Land – at the Mayfair Theatre

UPDATE:
here is the followup post from the event, with all the information and links of projects and upcoming events:

http://ipsmo.wordpress.com/2014/06/20/june19-followup/

 

In the lead-up to National Aboriginal Day (June 21), we’re happy to invite you to our exciting upcoming film night:

Indigenous Resistance and Solidarity
Against Pipelines, For The Land

Thursday June 19th, 6:30pm
at the Mayfair Theatre, 1074 Bank St
Ottawa (unceded Algonquin territory)

Additionally, from 8:45-10pm there will be an informal post-event social
Hosted by Southminster United Church (15 Aylmer Ave at Bank, one block from the theatre)

This event will feature four short films:

  • the new half-hour documentary being released this month about the Unist’ot’en resistance camp out in BC, that is blocking the construction of a number of pipelines and reasserting their Indigenous sovereignty.
  • a shorter film from 2013 that highlights cross-Canada Indigenous resistance to tar sands pipelines
  • video reporting of the police repression of anti-fracking protests in Elsipogtog last fall
  • an interview about anti-oppression, decolonization and responsible allyship from the 2012 PowerShift Canada climate justice conference(scroll down for full film titles / descriptions / preview links)

There will be an opening from Albert Dumont, “South Wind” (Algonquin, Kitigan Zibi)

We will also have speakers to profile local efforts and opportunities to get more involved.


We hope you’re excited too!

Here’s how you can to help support this event:

  • Mark your calendar and ask someone if they’d like to come with you!
  • If you’re on Facebook, invite 10 (or so) friends to the event
  • If you’ve got somewhere to put it, print out a poster (or 10)
  • Please share this link with your contacts

 

This event is hosted by us, IPSMO: Indigenous Peoples Solidarity Movement Ottawa, in partnership with Ecology Ottawa, the Peoples Social Forum, Council of Canadians, and CPAWS – Ottawa Valley (Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society).

There is a suggested donation of $5 – $15 at the door, as it is a fundraiser (but no one will be turned away for lack of funds). Monies raised will go to the Unist’ot’en camp as well as to the various filmmakers’ projects, and to Indigenous and solidarity participation in the Peoples Social Forum this August in Ottawa.

Hope to see you there!

 

Accessibility Notes:

  • The Mayfair Theatre has side entrances that are wheelchair accessible.
    The washrooms are not, but Shoppers Drug Mart (located next door) does have accessible washrooms.
  • Please refrain from wearing perfumes, colognes or other scented products
  • Please contact us if you require bus tickets

Contact: ipsmo@riseup.nethttp://www.ipsmo.org
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Films / descriptions / preview links:

RESIST: The Unist’ot’en’s Call to the Land (2014, 30min)
… is a documentary film that visits the fourth annual Environmental Action Camp, hosted on unceded Wet’suwet’en territory by the Unist’ot’en(C’ihlts’ehkhyu/Big Frog) clan. By re-instituting a Free, Prior, and Informed Consent Protocol on the bridge over Wedzin Kwah into their traditional territories, the Unist’ot’en are reasserting their indigenous sovereignty and standing up to industry and government who want to destroy their lands The focus of the film includes the exploration of the environmental, legal, and social issues surrounding hydraulic fracturing, tar sands, and the proposed Kinder-Morgan, Pacific Trails Pipeline, and Enbridge Northern Gateway Pipeline projects in British Columbia. The film’s themes also include indigenous sovereignty and decolonization, as well as documenting one of the most important resistance camps in North America and the movement it is a part of.
http://vimeo.com/74788986

Kahsatstenhsera: Indigenous Resistance to Tar Sands Pipelines (2013, 10min)
Kahsatstenhsera gah-sad-sdanh-se-ra is a Kanienkeha:ka (Mohawk) word that means Strength in Unity. This short documentary details contemporary Indigenous resistance to tar sands pipeline expansion, in particular the Line 9 and Energy East pipelines, which threaten the health of our territories in the northeast of Turtle Island. It includes the voices and perspectives of Dene, Wolastiqiyik, Mi’kmaq, Anishinaabe, Haudenosaunee and Wet’suwet’en land defenders.
http://reclaimturtleisland.com/videos/

Showdown at Highway 134 (2013, 5min)
With some of the only video from behind police lines, subMedia.tv witnessed the brutal raid by the Royal Colonial Mounted Police on the Mi’kmaq blockade of fracking equipment. But the fierce response of the community in defense of the warriors was also captured on camera. We bring you the real story about what really went down on Highway 134, the story that the corporate media doesn’t want you to see.
http://www.submedia.tv/showdown-at-highway-134/

Harsha Walia on Anti-Oppression, Decolonization and Responsible Allyship (2012, 10min)
“Given the devastating cultural, spiritual, economic, linguistic and political impacts of colonialism on Indigenous people in Canada, any serious attempt by non-natives at allying with Indigenous struggles must entail solidarity in the fight against colonization.” Recorded at the PowerShift Canada 2012 conference in Ottawa, unceded Algonquin territory.
http://ipsmo.wordpress.com/2012/11/01/harsha-walia-video-interview/

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Posters:
(please consider printing/displaying one or more posters
- be sure to check the box ‘fit/shrink to paper size’ when printing)

Facebook event page:
(if you’re on Facebook, please RSVP and invite your Ottawa friends)

May 14, 2014

Wed May 28 – Decolonize & Anti-Oppression Workshop, Ottawa

Decolonize & Anti Oppression Workshop – Ottawa (Algonquin Territory)

Taking place on Algonquin Territory.

 

DnAO may28 imgWednesday May 28th, 6:30pm – 9:30pm
at Bethel Fieldhouse (166 Frank St) in St.Luke’s Park

 

This workshop features a discussion about colonization from an indigenous context within Canada, as well as working on Anti-Oppression terminology, investigation & circle discussion and sharing knowledge about how to do community organizing, creating meaningful solidarity building, conflict resolutions processes & horizontal group/community structures.

Hosted by Indigenous Peoples’ Solidarity Movement Ottawa
In solidarity with the grassroots community actions of Idle No More.

Facilitated by: Tami Starlight is traveling from Vancouver / unceded Coast Salish territory to Montreal / Mohawk, Kanienkehaka, & Haudenosaunee territory.

 

Donation page for those who cannot make it. Please donate and pass it on. (every bit helps)
http://theantioppressionnetwork.wordpress.com/donate-now/

 

-When/Where-

Cost: $5 – $50 sliding scale; no one turned away due to lack of funds

Date: Wednesday, May 28th, 2014
Time: 6:30pm – 9:30pm

Location: Bethel Fieldhouse (166 Frank St) in St. Luke’s Park
(Near the corner of Elgin and Gladstone; the stand alone building in the middle of the park behind St. Louis Wings and Slice & Co.)

 

-What-

  • Discussion about colonization from an indigenous context within Canada
  • Anti-Oppression terminology investigation & circle discussion
  • Community organizing, meaningful solidarity building, conflict resolutions & horizontal group/community structures

 

-Accessibility-

 

-URLs-

 

 

-Contact Information-

for more info or accessibility requests please email:
decolonizeantioppression@gmail.com

 

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May 8, 2014

May 8 & 10 – Nonviolence Conference keynotes: Rajagopal P.V. / Clayton Thomas-Muller / Michel Thusky

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , , , , , , , , , — waawaaskesh @ 8:21 am

Conference: Nonviolence: A Weapon of the Strong

TWO OF THE TALKS WILL BE FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

May 8 – Thursday evening, 7:30 to 8:30 PM
with renowned nonviolent leader and activist, Rajagopal P.V.: Nonviolence, a Tool for Social Change.

May 10 – Saturday evening, 7:00 to 8:30 PM
with Clayton Thomas Muller of Idle No More, and Michel Thusky, an Algonquin Elder from Barriere Lake, both Indigenous leaders and activists.

LOCATION:
Both public talks will be in the Amphitheatre (room 1124),
Saint Paul University, 223 Main St, Ottawa.

The rest of the conference information can be found at: http://ustpaul.ca/en/conference-nonviolence-a-weapon-of-the-strong-mahatma-gandhi-advancing-nonviolence-spirituality-and-social-transformation_1601_17.htm

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About the speakers:

Rajagopal P.V. of Ekta Parishad is the foremost leader, teacher, and practitioner of nonviolence in India. From South India, Rajagopal began his work on nonviolence when he spent six years working in the Chambal region. He spent 15 years working with Indian rural youth through nonviolent and community building training programs. In 1993, Rajagopal became the Secretary of the Gandhi Peace Foundation. In 2007, he organized and led a large nonviolentmarch, Janadesh, where 25,000 people walked from Gwalior to Delhi. In 2012, after preparing for four years, Rajagopal organized a similar, although larger, nonviolent march where 100,000 people walked, again from Gwalior to Delhi, for land reform, and were successful in negotiating their requirements for sustainable land regulations. Rajagopal, along with the work of Ekta Parishad, is a world leader on nonviolent struggles, training and actions.

Clayton Thomas-Muller, of the Mathais Colomb Cree Nation (Pukatawagan) in Northern Manitoba, Canada, is an activist for indigenous self-determination and environmental justice. Based out of Ottawa, Clayton is the co-director of the Indigenous TarSands (ITS) Campaign of the Polaris Institute as well as a volunteer organizer with the Defenders of the Land-Idle No More national campaign known as Sovereignty Summer. Clayton is involved in many initiatives to support the building of an inclusive movement globally for energy and climate justice. He serves on the board of the Global Justice Ecology Project, Canadian based Raven Trust and Navajo Nation based, Black Mesa Water Coalition. Clayton has traveled extensively domestically and internationally leading Indigenous delegations to lobby United Nations bodies including the UN framework Convention on Climate Change, UN Earth Summits and the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues.

Michel Thusky is an Elder and spokesperson from the Algonquin community of Barriere Lake. He is involved with the Barriere Lake Solidarity activities, and is often a spokesperson for his community. Several documentaries, including the recent film Honour Your Word, have been made about the issues in Barriere Lake, and the lack of attention paid to the injustices suffered by the Algonquin community who live there. Mr. Thusky often addresses the various struggles, blockages and community identity in the context of his people’s struggle to defend their land, their way of life, and their traditional governance system against attacks by the colonial governments of Quebec and Canada.

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May 1, 2014

May 15 – Celebrate Land and Treaty Rights Defenders Grassy Narrows First Nation

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , , , , , , , , , , — waawaaskesh @ 3:37 pm

 

On May 15th Grassy Narrows First Nation will be going to the Supreme Court of Canada in order to protect their lands and treaty rights.

The Keewatin appeal is the next major Aboriginal Law Case to reach the Supreme Court of Canada and covers issues of jurisdiction, duty to consult and accommodate, and treaty interpretation.

For Treaty Nations across the country, it is hard to over-emphasize the importance of the Keewatin appeal.” (First Peoples Law, Dr. Bruce Mclvor)

Join us to celebrate their efforts at a community feast.

 

Thursday May 15th, 5:30pm – 8:00pm
St. Andrews Hall, 82 Kent St. (at Wellington), Ottawa

 

Pot luck supper with presentations from community members.

https://www.facebook.com/events/318301988316981/
 

Please Donate

Please bring a dish to share if you are able. Please let us know what you plan to bring.

We are also seeking donations from supportive organizations and individuals to cover the costs of additional food, beverages and rental of the hall, honorarium for elder and drummers etc. Donations of any amount are appreciated.

Donations can be made through MiningWatch Canada’s PayPal account (*please be sure to add a “special instruction” when making the donation*). We will happily pick up cash and cheque donations or they can be made on the night of the supper.

 

Lend a Hand

Ahead of the event we can use help with fundraising and food donations.

The day of the event we would appreciate help with food prep, set up and clean up.

 

Contact

Ramsey Hart: ramsey@miningwatch.ca 613-298-4745

Tasha -Dawn Doucette: solacetash@yahoo.ca 613-371-8274

 

Background to the Case

The Grassy Narrows or Keewatin case (named for Andrew Keewatin who is named in the court documents) argues that because forestry licenses issued to a large forestry corporation (now Resolute Forest Products) directly impact their treaty rights, Ontario does not have the authority to grant these licenses. Grassy Narrows sees Canada, not Ontario as their principal treaty partner. At the Ontario Superior Court, Grassy Narrows successfully argued that only the federal government has the authority to “take up” lands in the Keewatin. The decision was reversed upon appeal from Ontario and the company. During the appeal Wabauskang First Nation joined the case as they share the same treaty rights and challenges with Ontario authorizing resource extraction on their territory.

The court case is just one of the approaches Grassy Narrows has used to try and protect their land. They also have the longest standing active road blockade in Canada. The blockade controls access to part of their territory and actively monitor the territory for logging activity. In addition to facing industrial clear cut logging across their territory, Grassy is still recovering from the effects of their watershed being poisoned by mercury that was released by a pulp mill in the 1970s. Grassy is a community whose resilience, determination and resistance are an inspiration.

 

Links for more information:

 

 

April 29, 2014

“Honour Your Word”

 
honour your word posterThoughts from Albert “South Wind” Dumont, who attended our Earth Day screening of Honour Your Word, the new documentary about the Algonquins of Barriere Lake:

 

The documentary “Honour Your Word” to me, is a call for Canada’s citizens to go on the march in defence of the sacredness Canadians claim to place on the threads which connect the hearts and souls of all the good people who populate this great land. Watch the film and if, after doing so, you are not motivated to help make things right in La Verendrye Park where justice has been drawn, quartered and burned at the stake, then you are as spiritless as the perpetrators of the human rights violations taking place there today. The Algonquins of Barriere Lake are standing alone against tyranny and oppression. They are a brave resourceful people living in Third World poverty whose plight is documented in a film produced and directed by Martha Stiegman.

Where is the mirror that would show Canadians what really is looking back at them when they peer into it? It does exist, but most of us (Canadians) will have to wait until death carries them to a new world to see it. The ugliness of their ways will be revealed and an accounting of some kind will surely come to pass at that time.

We, the First Peoples, live in a world where only the human rights violations directly impacting settlers or injustices being perpetrated against people in far off countries like China or the Middle East are worthy of Canadians’ support and sympathy. When human rights violations are occurring against the Aboriginal People of this land, Canadians turn a blind eye and a deaf ear to it. Canadians need to ask themselves why this is so. To me, the answer begins and ends with ‘greed’.

“Honour”, the real definition of that word does not exist in our Parliaments only because Canadians do not demand it as a trait alive and strong, in the men and women we send to the Red Chamber to represent us before the world and before God. We must ask ourselves how our children and their children will be impacted by our negligence of duty to them when we do such a thing. Surely we doom them (our children) to a world where dog eats dog, where the weak are spat upon and where peaceful protest is laughed at and ignored.

The film is interesting throughout but several powerful scenes stand out to me as highlights. One scene is particularly moving, it shows a young Barriere Lake Algonquin man standing before the camera telling about what is being lost of his beloved land when clear-cutting occurs. His words are strong and heartfelt, he is overcome with emotion and though weeping almost uncontrollably, he finishes his statement. I wept with him while sitting in the darkness of the theatre and cannot banish the scene from my mind. It will be my inspiration and motivation to get involved and help with this cause in whatever way the Algonquins ask of me.

One thing the film makes clear to me at least, is that the peaceful protest of the Algonquins up to this point, is nothing more than an exercise in pointless frustration. They protest peacefully to protect the trees and their way of life. Their leaders are thrown in jail when they do so. “Next time you will not be jailed for short periods of time but for years,” they are warned by the courts. Knowledge of such injustices and oppression makes my heart sick.

What is happening in La Verendrye Park is proof positive of just how racist a country Canada is. Only a people who are capable of raw, unadulterated hatred against a segment of the community not their own would allow what is happening to the Algonquins of Barriere Lake to occur in a country like Canada. God help us.

Keep the Circle Strong,
South Wind.

 

Albert Dumont, “South Wind”, is a Poet, Storyteller, Speaker, and an Algonquin Traditional Teacher. He was born and raised in traditional Algonquin territory (Kitigan Zibi). He has been walking the “Red Road” since commencing his sobriety in 1988. He has published four books of poetry and short stories and one children’s book, written in three languages. His website is www.albertdumont.com

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More on the film and the struggle of the Algonquins of Barriere Lake:

 

Action items:

HYW-poster-jpg
 
Resources for Barriere Lake:

 

More about the film:


 

 

 

April 26, 2014

May 4 – Open Meeting for the Indigenous Peoples’ Solidarity Movement Ottawa

 

Are you interested in doing Indigenous solidarity organizing?

Do you want to learn more about how to effectively oppose colonialism and to support Indigenous people, communities and nations?

If so, come out to the IPSM Ottawa’s upcoming open meeting, and get involved!

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Open Meeting for the Indigenous Peoples’ Solidarity Movement – Ottawa (IPSMO)

Image by Tania Willard.

Image by Tania Willard.

Sunday, May 4th at 2:00pm

Jack Purcell Community Centre, Rm 101
320 Jack Purcell Lane, near Elgin and Gilmour (Bus # 5 & 14)

www.facebook.com/events/264685173702861

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Everyone Welcome!

Wheelchair Accessible

Contact us if you require ASL/LSF, bus tickets, child care:
ipsmo@riseup.nethttp://www.ipsmo.org

=============================

 

We are currently one of the anchor groups working on organizing an Indigenous Solidarity Assembly during the Peoples’ Social Forum (PSF) in August of 2014.

In addition to this we will be doing other organizing to support the Forum, including activities such as designing and doing workshops about Indigenous Solidarity similar to, for example, our Indigenous Solidarity for Settlers workshop.

 

Indigenous Peoples Solidarity Movement Ottawa (IPSMO)

Indigenous Peoples Solidarity Movement Ottawa (IPSMO)

About the IPSM Ottawa

The Indigenous Peoples’ Solidarity Movement of Ottawa started as a group of activists who did some solidarity organizing in support of the six nations land reclamation near Caledonia, in the summer of 2006.

Since then we have been doing Indigenous solidarity organizing in many varied ways and in support of many different people, issues, communities and nations. Some of this work includes supporting the Tyendinaga Mohawks during their occupation a quarry on their territory, supporting the Ardoch Algonquin and the Shabot Obaadjiwan First Nations in their opposition to a uranium nine on their territory, and supporting local anti-racist organizing at Carleton University.

Most of the work that we have done in the past 6 years, however, has been in support of the Algonquin community of Barriere Lake and supporting initiatives and groups struggling for justice for missing and murdered Indigenous women, girls and two-spirits.

 

Our Basis of Unity:

The Indigenous Peoples Solidarity Movement – Ottawa (IPSMO) is a grassroots organization that directly supports indigenous peoples in diverse struggles for justice. We also work within communities to challenge the lies and half-truths about indigenous peoples and colonization that dominate Canadian society. The organization is open to both indigenous and non-indigenous people, and focuses on local and regional campaigns.

As we act in solidarity with indigenous people, we build relationships where we can learn from indigenous cultures. By doing this, we can further decolonize ourselves, and so learn to better challenge the racist and colonial ideas that dominate Canadian society.

We provide support to actions and campaigns for Indigenous sovereignty, self-determination, defense of the land, environmental protection, cultural revitalization, and the honouring of treaties and agreements.

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March 28, 2014

April 22 – HONOUR YOUR WORD: Celebrating the Defense of Mother Earth!

 

Click image to print poster

Click image to print poster

Movie Screening and Fund Raiser for the Algonquins of Barriere Lake

With special guests: Barriere Lake community members including Norm Matchewan and Elder Michel Thusky, and (via Skype) filmmaker Martha Stiegman

Tuesday, April 22 at 6:30pm (doors 6pm)
at the Mayfair Theatre
1074 Bank St. (near Sunnyside)
Buses # 1 & 7 (Bank) or # 5 (Riverdale)

$5-15 suggested donation
(no one turned away for lack of funds)
Fundraiser for Barriere Lake: Click to donate

 

Honour Your Word is a new documentary film – an intimate portrait of life behind the barricades for the Algonquins of Barriere Lake, an inspiring First Nation whose dignity and courage contrast sharply with the political injustice they face.
 

Presented in Ottawa by the Indigenous Peoples Solidarity Movement Ottawa, with Diffusion Multi-Monde and co-sponsors MiningWatch Canada, OPIRG-Carleton, OPIRG/GRIPO-Ottawa and OSSTF District-25 Human Rights / Status of Women Committee.

 

Honour Your Word – trailer
 

 

9-minute interview with filmmaker Martha Stiegman, from CHUO 89.1FM radio show Click Here with host Mitchell Caplan:
 

 

Accessibility Notes:

  • The Mayfair Theatre has side entrances that are wheelchair accessible.
    The washrooms are not, but Shoppers Drug Mart (located next door) does have accessible washrooms.
  • Please refrain from wearing perfumes, colognes or other scented products
  • Please contact us if you require ASL/LSQ
  • Please contact us if you require bus tickets

Contact: ipsmo@riseup.net – www.ipsmo.org
 

Please help us promote this event!

 
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Celebrating the Defense of Mother Earth!

This movie screening of Honour Your Word is the IPSM Ottawa’s 3rd “Earth Day” event Celebrating the Defense of Mother Earth!

Last year we were honoured to work with Defenders of the Land and Land Defenders from Six Nations and we raised $1405 for the legal defense of activists from Six Nations, and in 2009 we organized our 1st event with Minwaashin Lodge, the Tungasuvvingat Inuit, and others.

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More about the movie – Honour Your Word (2013, 59min):

New Algonquin leaders are followed as their community fights to protect their land, their way of life and their language.

The title refers to the Algonquins of Barriere Lake’s campaign slogan demanding Canada and Quebec honour a precedent-setting conservation deal signed in 1991. Director Martha Stiegman spent four years shooting this poetic, heartfelt documentary that challenges stereotypes of “angry Indians.” Honour Your Word juxtaposes starkly contrasting landscapes—the majesty of the bush, a dramatic highway stand-off against a riot squad, daily life within the confines of the reserve—to reveal the spirit of a people for whom blockading has become a part of their way of life, a life rooted in the forest they are defending.

For more information:

 
 

March 25, 2014

Truth & Reconciliation Commission proceedings – Live screening in Ottawa March 27-30, 2014

The final public hearing of testimonials from survivors of Canada’s residential schools is being held from this coming Thursday (March 27) through Sunday (March 30).

Live streaming of the Edmonton Truth and Reconciliation Commission hearings will be offered at First United Church (347 Richmond Rd. in Ottawa) in the chapel. There will be a host to orient you to what is going on, and provide hot drinks.

Free for all who wish to come and be a caring witness. See schedule below for daily times (all in the afternoons and evenings).

We invite you to come and gather in community as long distance witnesses to the proceedings. Our witness is important. A full schedule of events can be viewed on the www.trc.ca website under events – livestreaming is available to everyone through that website.

  • Opening Ceremony: Thurs March 27th 12-2pm
  • Commissioners Sharing: Fri March 28th 3-5pm
  • Call to Gather: Fri March 28th 6-8pm
    (includes Honorary Witness Ceremony and Expressions of Reconciliation)
  • Commissioners Sharing: Sat, March 29th 11am-2pm & 3-5pm
  • Call to Gather: Sat March 29th 6-8pm
  • Expressions of reconciliation: Sun March 30th 11am-12noon
  • Commissioners Sharing: Sun March 30th 12-2pm, 3-5pm
  • Survivor Birthday Celebration: Sun March 30th 5-5:30pm
  • Closing Ceremony: Sun March 30th 6-8p.m

For more information, email: jhardman@rogers.com

February 28, 2014

Open Meeting for the Indigenous Peoples’ Solidarity Movement Ottawa – Thurs March 13, 2014

Filed under: Uncategorized — waawaaskesh @ 3:21 pm

383944_351185741565023_816275426_n[1]Are you interested in doing Indigenous solidarity organizing? Do you want to learn more about how to effectively oppose colonialism and to support Indigenous people, communities and nations?

If so, come out to the IPSM Ottawa’s upcoming open meeting, and get involved!

=============================

Thursday, March 13 at 7:00pm

Bronson Centre, Room 109

211 Bronson Ave.

Near Bronson and Lisgar

Near the Transitway

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Everyone Welcome!

Wheelchair Accessible

http://www.ipsmo.org/

Contact us if you require ASL/LSF,

bus tickets, child care:

ipsmo@riseup.net

Print out a poster:

http://ipsmo.files.wordpress.com/2014/03/ipsmoopenmeeting.pdf

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Are you interested in doing Indigenous Solidarity organizing? Do you want to learn more about how to effectively oppose colonialism and to support Indigenous communities and peoples?

If so, come out to the IPSM Ottawa upcoming open meeting, and get involved!

We are currently working on an event for Earth Day on April 22. The event will be a movie screening of “Honor Your Word” a documentary by Marth Stiegman: “Honour Your Word is an intimate portrait of life behind the barricades for the Algonquins of Barriere Lake, an inspiring First Nation whose dignity and courage contrast sharply with the political injustice they face.”

We will also be working with the community , and will have a spokesperson from Barrire Lake there to talk about the current situation, and to answer questions.

About the IPSM Ottawa

The Indigenous Peoples’ Solidarity Movement of Ottawa started as a group of activists who did some solidarity organizing in support of the six nations land reclamation near Caledonia, in the summer of 2006.

Since then we have been doing Indigenous solidarity organizing in many varied ways and in support of many different people, issues, communities and nations. Some of this work includes supporting the Tyendinaga Mohawks during their occupation a quarry on their territory, supporting the Ardoch Algonquin and the Shabot Obaadjiwan First Nations in their opposition to a uranium nine on their territory, and supporting local anti-racist organizing at Carleton University.

Most of the work that we have done in the past 6 years, however, has been in support of the Algonquin community of Barriere Lake and supporting initiatives and groups struggling for justice for missing and murdered Indigenous women, girls and two-spirits.

Our Basis of Unity:

The Indigenous Peoples Solidarity Movement – Ottawa (IPSMO) is a grassroots organization that directly supports indigenous peoples in diverse struggles for justice. We also work within communities to challenge the lies and half-truths about indigenous peoples and colonization that dominate Canadian society. The organization is open to both indigenous and non-indigenous people, and focuses on local and regional campaigns.

As we act in solidarity with indigenous people, we build relationships where we can learn from indigenous cultures. By doing this, we can further decolonize ourselves, and so learn to better challenge the racist and colonial ideas that dominate Canadian society.

We provide support to actions and campaigns for Indigenous sovereignty, self-determination, defense of the land, environmental protection, cultural revitalization, and the honouring of treaties and agreements.

 

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